Dash: realistic throttle only range?

Paul E.

Active Member
Sorry if this has been asked and answered already, but now that many have been riding the Dash, has anyone tried how many miles it goes without pedaling at all? I'm looking for a commuter bike that could get me to work in the morning without a drop of sweat and I'd get the exercise then on the trip home. Can the Dash carry a 200 lb dude with electrons alone for 10 mostly level miles?
 

Court

Administrator
Staff member
Hi Paul! There are a number of factors to consider here but thanks for sharing your weight and terrain. On a level surface, without wind, for a 200 pound rider given the stock 500 watt gearless motor and 48 volt 8.7 amp hour Lithium battery pack you should be able to go ~10 miles. One of the biggest factors here is acceleration from stop. If you give the bike more time and are gentle with the throttle you will save a lot of energy. Also, if you ride at <= 15 miles per hour the drag from air resistance will be lessened.

I believe the E3 Dash provides 40 Newton Meters of force but I'm not sure how many amps it draws. The capacity of the battery is 418 watts (48*8.7) so maybe we can use these stats to transform the energy potential into an estimated output?

A basic estimate would be to divide the watt hours by 20 (a rough estimate for what's required to go one mile according to electricbike.com and supported by this post using real data from a rider on the forums here). So 418 Wh / 20 (Watts estimated to go 1 mile) = 20.9 (miles) given a top speed of 20mph that means you could ride for >= 1 hour. Unfortunately, this equation doesn't take rider weight, motor size or amps drawn into consideration. I was trying to use this tool to convert watts to Newton meters but was unable to build an equation that made sense.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
Hi Paul! There are a number of factors to consider here but thanks for sharing your weight and terrain. On a level surface, without wind, for a 200 pound rider given the stock 500 watt gearless motor and 48 volt 8.7 amp hour Lithium battery pack you should be able to go ~10 miles. One of the biggest factors here is acceleration from stop. If you give the bike more time and are gentle with the throttle you will save a lot of energy. Also, if you ride at <= 15 miles per hour the drag from air resistance will be lessened.

I believe the E3 Dash provides 40 Newton Meters of force but I'm not sure how many amps it draws. The capacity of the battery is 418 watts (48*8.7) so maybe we can use these stats to transform the energy potential into an estimated output?

A basic estimate would be to divide the watt hours by 20 (a rough estimate for what's required to go one mile according to electricbike.com and supported by this post using real data from a rider on the forums here). So 418 Wh / 20 (Watts estimated to go 1 mile) = 20.9 (miles) given a top speed of 20mph that means you could ride for >= 1 hour. Unfortunately, this equation doesn't take rider weight, motor size or amps drawn into consideration. I was trying to use this tool to convert watts to Newton meters but was unable to build an equation that made sense.

Although instant torque and peak torque values are often different, 40Nm value seems within the range of torque offered by electric drives. I have seen Currie claiming that their E3 peak/ JD tranzx drive train offers 70Nm of torque (peak torque)!! Bosch performance line offers 60Nm.

The simplified version of Wh to distance equation gives a fair estimate. I have seen number of posts on Endless Sphere about this and people who pedal hard use 13 Wh instead of 20Wh. 10 miles should be easily doable on the 417 Wh Dash battery. With a little bit of coasting, 10 miles + return trip/pedaling should be alright.

On my bike, with 70% Eco + 30% Standard assist, I get 50 miles and I pedal 100% of the time.
 

Kyle hamor

Member
I did a Couple test for anyone who is interested in this thread. To my surprise this bike is able to go almost 20 miles with just throttle, about 18.5 to be exact. The only thing that I would do is accelerate slowly and peddling to help the battery get up to 20. I suppose that is because this motor in particular is a high speed, and is very efficient around 20 mph. (I averaged 19mph) Could be due to the fact that I only have about a 100 miles on my bike so the battery is still very new. I assume that also it helps that I live in Florida, which is 100% flat everywhere. Even with these things considered I'd say that that is awesome range for no peddling except when taking off, where I'd keep the bike in a lower gear so it was really easy to peddle 5 to 10 rotations then I'd go right back to coasting at about 19.5mph (acceleration pulls a lot from the battery). I can say after extensive experience and use on the dash I'm getting better range results than the izip Currie website states. I should also mention I'm 190 pounds and am 6"1.
 

Kyle hamor

Member
I forgot to mention, I don't Wear shirt at all when I ride, I do believe this makes aerodynamics much better than a shirt that flaps around in the wind.. I guess that this worth noting.
 

Kyle hamor

Member
Lol. Did another test today, rode at around 15 average speed and peddling just to help it start moving. And I was blown away, I went 19.01 miles and only used 2 bars out of 5!!! I was very careful not to accelerate fast but still! I think if you ride like I did at 15mph you should be able to go about 40 miles with just throttle! I am very impressed, and surprised by these numbers!
 

Paul E.

Active Member
Ok, soon hypermiling e-bikes just like cars is going to be a thing. Anyway sounds like 10 miles will be easy if you don't accelerate hard.
 

Court

Administrator
Staff member
Lol. Did another test today, rode at around 15 average speed and peddling just to help it start moving. And I was blown away, I went 19.01 miles and only used 2 bars out of 5!!! I was very careful not to accelerate fast but still! I think if you ride like I did at 15mph you should be able to go about 40 miles with just throttle! I am very impressed, and surprised by these numbers!
Awesome! Thanks for the real world feedback Kyle. I keep hearing that acceleration is where most of the energy is spent with ebikes and probably electric cars (if you start hard and fast). Two bars of energy for 19 miles is fantastic...