Dash, thinking about weight and my entry level fork.

Shea N Encinitas

Active Member
First off here is a video about revamping your entry level fork, something to consider. Mine is doggin at 2K.

Second, below is a graphic where I tried to log the component weights, many missing and estimated values, submit corrections if you like, or just look at the forks (both rigid and parallel based suspension) that I'm day dreaming about. I suspect a 38C tire would get me a little distance, and that rolling weight is a killer. BTW - That Ritchy rigid would take 3.25 lbs off the bike, a good start. -Shea

Shea_Izip_E3_Dash_Weights_02.jpg

EDIT: Updated graphic with Marathon Racer (tnx 4 tip), 35C is also an acceptable option, just be sure to get a quality tire with strong sidewalls. Just to be clear the Lauf Trail Racer is not compatible as it has a tapered steerer and 15 mm through axle, I just like the design and weight, maybe they will expand the product line.
 
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Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
I suspect that biggest weight difference can be found near the tires (aka, shea's waist line), can save you a whopping 10 lbs ;)
 

Shea N Encinitas

Active Member
5'10", 185 lbs wet, so yes a small tire there. I'd really like to know the true weight of the stock tires, was hoping a drop to 38 or even 35C would buy me some helium, and for something I'll need to replace soon anyway.

BTW - I know little about MTB forks, but like the BodyFloat I'm attracted to new designs, springy stuff, and light. Cheers, -S
 

gadgetguy

Member
5'10", 185 lbs wet, so yes a small tire there. I'd really like to know the true weight of the stock tires, was hoping a drop to 38 or even 35C would buy me some helium, and for something I'll need to replace soon anyway.

BTW - I know little about MTB forks, but like the BodyFloat I'm attracted to new designs, springy stuff, and light. Cheers, -S
If you are riding mainly on the pavement, my first suggestion would be to search for less aggressive tires that will allow you to inflate much higher than your current tires. Do you have your current tires inflated to the maximum? Improving the rolling resistance may benefit you more than trying to shed a few pounds from a fairly heavy bike. I would worry about upsetting the balance of the bike in changing to a carbon fork.
 

Pace

Member
tires would be an easy win for weight, i hadn't looked it up but was guessing those 700x45 CSTs were going to be pretty heavy. Take a look at Schwalbe's Marathon Racers, those are another pound lighter than the Plus' if you don't need the heavy duty flat resistance, but still a tough tire. I've had good luck w/ these on tandems.

Tires and wheels are one thing, but I don't know how sensitive this bike is going to be to a few pounds in the fork or crank, it's really a different beast because of the speed. Cruising around at 25+, I'm thinking aero mods might be a bigger help w/ range and battery consumption. If the handle bar wasn't so crowded I would have flipped the stem and tossed on my clip-on profile aero bars just to try it out. I bet it would look ridiculous AND be really effective.
 

Shea N Encinitas

Active Member
Thanks for the tip on the racers, reckon that puncture resistance comes at a cost.

I'm thinking aero mods might be a bigger help w/ range and battery consumption.

Oh I can tuck on the beast, I just rest my forearms on the bars and even bring the head down and knees in a bit, 30 miles almost every day, maybe 30% TT position.

Do you have your current tires inflated to the maximum?

I run 60 PSI, can feel by hand when it drops more than 5 PSI, every 150 miles or so.

I would worry about upsetting the balance of the bike in changing to a carbon fork.

Oh, like a pedego ;) - in this weight class and long wheel base there is room to play IMO, I'd even consider a lighter front wheel. Currently I can ride it in dirt and bumps with no hands while putting on a jacket. I just don't like the idea of 4.6 lbs of basically dead fork up front.

I'm just window shopping for now, sharing my thoughts, and thanks for yours. Cranks and many parts will remain stock (this is a controlled daydream), but a 52 tooth ring W/O the extra guides or bash guards (no tree hopping here) might be worth trying as I'm living in the last 3 small gears, not to overdrive but for some granularity on that end of the drive train (jumps too quickly to low gears, cadence bump).

Maybe I can lose enough weight to haul a racked extra battery and land back sub 50 lbs, 17.4 Amp Hours (via swap), 60 - 70 mile range, this is where I'm heading.

-Shea

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DashRiprock

Active Member
From someone who has intentionally weighed down the Dash beyond even an 'abnormal' rider weight (whatever that is, I guess one would have to ask Michelle) with 'abnormal' gear and who runs the Marathon Plus tires somewhat for that reason..I would go with the extra battery to reach a 60 mile range. I personally haven't noticed the battery dropping off fast in the manner that at least I drain it (yet I will never put my head down, lean on the bars and pedal like there's no tomorrow, either). ;)
Thanks a bunch for the video.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the tip on the racers, reckon that puncture resistance comes at a cost.

I'm thinking aero mods might be a bigger help w/ range and battery consumption.

Oh I can tuck on the beast, I just rest my forearms on the bars and even bring the head down and knees in a bit, 30 miles almost every day, maybe 30% TT position.

Do you have your current tires inflated to the maximum?

I run 60 PSI, can feel by hand when it drops more than 5 PSI, every 150 miles or so.

I would worry about upsetting the balance of the bike in changing to a carbon fork.

Oh, like a pedego ;) - in this weight class and long wheel base there is room to play IMO, I'd even consider a lighter front wheel. Currently I can ride it in dirt and bumps with no hands while putting on a jacket. I just don't like the idea of 4.6 lbs of basically dead fork up front.

I'm just window shopping for now, sharing my thoughts, and thanks for yours. Cranks and many parts will remain stock (this is a controlled daydream), but a 52 tooth ring W/O the extra guides or bash guards (no tree hopping here) might be worth trying as I'm living in the last 3 small gears, not to overdrive but for some granularity on that end of the drive train (jumps too quickly to low gears, cadence bump).

Maybe I can lose enough weight to haul a racked extra battery and land back sub 50 lbs, 17.4 Amp Hours (via swap), 60 - 70 mile range, this is where I'm heading.

-Shea

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Agree with this.
My strong hunch is that "Aero" mod is going to be effective rather than tires or forks. Over 25mph, the aerodynamics are far more different compared to 18-19mph.
Also, I feel that outfitting a $2.5K bike with $1k worth of extra is unnecessary. You could as well buy a better bike.

You know, I have 2100 miles on odometer and I run knobbier Schwalbe Smart Sam Plus tires on my Jumper, it is heavy and it does slow me down by couple of mph but the thought of not having to deal with a flat is far more enticing to me. On an ebike, rolling resistance, weight etc can be easily trumped by having an extra battery.
 

Shea N Encinitas

Active Member
Agree with this. My strong hunch is that "Aero" mod is going to be [more] effective rather than tires or forks. Over 25mph, the aerodynamics are far more different compared to 18-19mph.

Yes, the inverse square - 4 times the effort to double the speed, no argument here. It is also cheaper to lose weight but I think we covered that.

Also, I feel that outfitting a $2.5K bike with $1k worth of extra is unnecessary. You could as well buy a better bike.

Depends on what your description of better is (sounding like Bill Clinton here), I could easily sell a few toys and raise 5 grand, but for what?.. a speed limited mid drive, something that interfaces with the smartphone I don't own or want, something heavier? For the most part I'm happy with my mid level purchase, if I choose to upgrade maybe I end up spending 4 or 5 G's on my bike, but for the components I want and possibly in a weight range that is better for my annual mileage.

With the relative short life of ebikes, it is a first glance rather frivolous to buy anything but chains, brake pads, tire and tubes. But when you ride as much as I do, AND many of the parts can migrate to my next rig, it is money well spent. Of course a 2nd battery takes precedence, and I tend to modify everything I ride or drive anyway, it is my nature.

-Shea
 

Shea N Encinitas

Active Member
From someone who has intentionally weighed down the Dash beyond even an 'abnormal' rider weight (whatever that is, I guess one would have to ask Michelle) with 'abnormal' gear and who runs the Marathon Plus tires somewhat for that reason..I would go with the extra battery to reach a 60 mile range. I personally haven't noticed the battery dropping off fast in the manner that at least I drain it (yet I will never put my head down, lean on the bars and pedal like there's no tomorrow, either). ;)
Thanks a bunch for the video.
Hey DashRiprock, what width Marathon Plus did you choose, did it change the feel of the bike much? With roadies a 23 to 25cm is a big change. I'm thinking 38 or even 35C. Pics of you bikes up here?, or you on the DL :cool:

-S
 

Shea N Encinitas

Active Member
Just to follow up I installed the 38c Schwalbe Marathon Racers yesterday, let me tell you I sure like rolling on 75 psi! (85 max). Reduced weight is self evident making her more nimble, a sporty ride VS over-weighting and over-steering the heavy 45's. I even held some gears that I would normally drop, and indexed up one on some flat areas.

I hope you riders will wear out your wheels because it means you are enjoying life, and when you do I strongly recommend you consider a slightly narrower tire, unless of course you are bushwhacking up in Canada or somthing. Even if you have lots of tread on those stock 45's, perhaps you are lookin to get bookin sooner than latter - go for it! Thanks for those that guided this particular brainstorm. -S

Schwalbe-38c_X_45c_Tires_6644.jpg
 

Pace

Member
glad those marathon racers are working out. I'm not sure why all the ebikes have these oversized tires (even the strictly road oriented ebikes I tried had big tires).