Declaration increases the likelihood of doing it.

K PierreR

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I have been surfing longer distance bicycle touring journals and diaries of different trips that might be of interest to me on Crazyguyonabike.com and ebikes.topicwise.com I find them cheap entertainment and have hoped something good would rub off.
I am most interested in long distance dirt touring such as the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route
Most of the people whom take on a long distance self contained bicycle trip, are people whom are in one of life's big changes or are retired. Fitness varies all over the place and many start pretty unfit for the task.
Long distance self contained dirt touring (gravel/off road) is virtually non existent in the E bike world and has a high misery/high reward index in the regular biking world.
Most people ride bikes on tires that are inadequate for the job and are dealing with significant reoccurring issues.
Most of them do not eat very well or sleep very well. They spend a lot of time being miserable and complaining about it.
There is a large contrast between E bike tourers and regular bike tourers.
E bike tourers tend to camp here and there but seek out mostly credit card lodging and restaurants E bikers tend to take pictures of food, people and buildings of interest with a few shots of scenery.
Regular bike tourers tend to complain a lot more, eat poor, cook little, stress more and take pictures of misery, scenery, road surfaces, weather and summits once the reach the top of their climbs.
Misery is engaging in victimhood. It is going to be cold, hot, wet and dusty, dress for it. Regular hydration and eating good foods go a long way to reducing the misery index. You can decide these thing and what mood you want. Its not written in stone that you need to be miserable for the experience.
I am 66 years old and retired. I intend to do the Great Divide Mountain Bike route next summer with my dog. The longest stretch without a power plug is 130 miles (208km) from Atlantic City Wyoming to Rawlins Wyoming. I can do that. There is very little information out there on how to do this with an E bike so, I guess I will breaking the ice. I should get a lot of stares on a big fat E bike, with a tiny little poodle. She brings me companionship and a great deal of joy.
Writing about it brings it closer to reality. This year I was close to doing something big but had no experience. I still have limited experience but, I have some and will get more between now and then.
 

Hasaf

Member
When I rode my "Never Plug-In" trip from Kansas to Utah I crossed the Contentinal divide at two posted places. It was a long trip.
IMG-20170605-113807072.jpg


Yes, I am aware that the "slow-moving vehicle" triangle was not legal according to the letter of the law. However, it was applicable and I was never hassled about it. One mistake I made was I carried a lot more than I needed to. That said, it was a great trip.

IMG-20170606-183428838.jpg

I tended to take pictures of places I camped.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
I have been surfing longer distance bicycle touring journals and diaries of different trips that might be of interest to me on Crazyguyonabike.com and ebikes.topicwise.com I find them cheap entertainment and have hoped something good would rub off.
I am most interested in long distance dirt touring such as the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route
Most of the people whom take on a long distance self contained bicycle trip, are people whom are in one of life's big changes or are retired. Fitness varies all over the place and many start pretty unfit for the task.
Long distance self contained dirt touring (gravel/off road) is virtually non existent in the E bike world and has a high misery/high reward index in the regular biking world.
Most people ride bikes on tires that are inadequate for the job and are dealing with significant reoccurring issues.
Most of them do not eat very well or sleep very well. They spend a lot of time being miserable and complaining about it.
There is a large contrast between E bike tourers and regular bike tourers.
E bike tourers tend to camp here and there but seek out mostly credit card lodging and restaurants E bikers tend to take pictures of food, people and buildings of interest with a few shots of scenery.
Regular bike tourers tend to complain a lot more, eat poor, cook little, stress more and take pictures of misery, scenery, road surfaces, weather and summits once the reach the top of their climbs.
Misery is engaging in victimhood. It is going to be cold, hot, wet and dusty, dress for it. Regular hydration and eating good foods go a long way to reducing the misery index. You can decide these thing and what mood you want. Its not written in stone that you need to be miserable for the experience.
I am 66 years old and retired. I intend to do the Great Divide Mountain Bike route next summer with my dog. The longest stretch without a power plug is 130 miles (208km) from Atlantic City Wyoming to Rawlins Wyoming. I can do that. There is very little information out there on how to do this with an E bike so, I guess I will breaking the ice. I should get a lot of stares on a big fat E bike, with a tiny little poodle. She brings me companionship and a great deal of joy.
Writing about it brings it closer to reality. This year I was close to doing something big but had no experience. I still have limited experience but, I have some and will get more between now and then.
Following. I don't understand the need to feel pain for recreation that some people seem to have.
 

K PierreR

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
When I rode my "Never Plug-In" trip from Kansas to Utah I crossed the Contentinal divide at two posted places. It was a long trip.
That had to be one slow trip. I like about 80 miles a day in 5 hours of saddle time.
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I have been surfing longer distance bicycle touring journals and diaries of different trips that might be of interest to me on Crazyguyonabike.com and ebikes.topicwise.com I find them cheap entertainment and have hoped something good would rub off.
I am most interested in long distance dirt touring such as the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route
Most of the people whom take on a long distance self contained bicycle trip, are people whom are in one of life's big changes or are retired. Fitness varies all over the place and many start pretty unfit for the task.
Long distance self contained dirt touring (gravel/off road) is virtually non existent in the E bike world and has a high misery/high reward index in the regular biking world.
Most people ride bikes on tires that are inadequate for the job and are dealing with significant reoccurring issues.
Most of them do not eat very well or sleep very well. They spend a lot of time being miserable and complaining about it.
There is a large contrast between E bike tourers and regular bike tourers.
E bike tourers tend to camp here and there but seek out mostly credit card lodging and restaurants E bikers tend to take pictures of food, people and buildings of interest with a few shots of scenery.
Regular bike tourers tend to complain a lot more, eat poor, cook little, stress more and take pictures of misery, scenery, road surfaces, weather and summits once the reach the top of their climbs.
Misery is engaging in victimhood. It is going to be cold, hot, wet and dusty, dress for it. Regular hydration and eating good foods go a long way to reducing the misery index. You can decide these thing and what mood you want. Its not written in stone that you need to be miserable for the experience.
I am 66 years old and retired. I intend to do the Great Divide Mountain Bike route next summer with my dog. The longest stretch without a power plug is 130 miles (208km) from Atlantic City Wyoming to Rawlins Wyoming. I can do that. There is very little information out there on how to do this with an E bike so, I guess I will breaking the ice. I should get a lot of stares on a big fat E bike, with a tiny little poodle. She brings me companionship and a great deal of joy.
Writing about it brings it closer to reality. This year I was close to doing something big but had no experience. I still have limited experience but, I have some and will get more between now and then.
Sounds incredible. I live near the Pacific Ocean in CA and see a fair amount of people doing long rides. (Analog bikes.)
I'm always impressed with the passion involved.

Maybe do one of your shakedown trips "acting as if" to fine tune what to take and what not to.
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
A Demented Corner of the North Cascades
My own personal opinion is that most people are wimps. They consider it an "epic" if they lose cell service and run out of granola bars.

You can get through a lot with a little bit of physical and mental toughness, a positive mental attitude, and a sense of humor. And having the maturity to realize that even on a great adventure there are going to be some not-so-great moments. Maybe I am a bit eccentric, but it doesn't really seem like an adventure if there aren't moments when you are completely lost, in the teeth of serious weather, or dealing with a screwed up situation that necessitates a massive change of plans.
 

Hasaf

Member
My own personal opinion is that most people are wimps. They consider it an "epic" if they lose cell service and run out of granola bars.

You can get through a lot with a little bit of physical and mental toughness, a positive mental attitude, and a sense of humor. And having the maturity to realize that even on a great adventure there are going to be some not-so-great moments. Maybe I am a bit eccentric, but it doesn't really seem like an adventure if there aren't moments when you are completely lost, in the teeth of serious weather, or dealing with a screwed up situation that necessitates a massive change of plans.

I came across a great definition of adventure. Adventure is hardship recalled at leisure.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
"completely lost, in the teeth of serious weather, or dealing with a screwed up situation " sounds a lot like my average Tuesday, but I would prefer otherwise ... I think.
 

K PierreR

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
My average was also about 80-90 miles a day.
I did not get an E bike to work that hard. I can come close to estimating how much of a charge you could do per day. You put in plenty of your own power. Plugs are pretty easy to find. For 80 miles I use about 1,360 watt hours on a dirt tour. If I slow way down I can extend my battery out to 130 miles plus. My average speed is about 16 mph.
 

Hasaf

Member
I did not get an E bike to work that hard. I can come close to estimating how much of a charge you could do per day. You put in plenty of your own power. Plugs are pretty easy to find. For 80 miles I use about 1,360 watt hours on a dirt tour. If I slow way down I can extend my battery out to 130 miles plus. My average speed is about 16 mph.

On the way to the summit in my top picture, I had to stop once and go for a hike while the solar panels replenished the batteries. It was only about thirty miles of climbing, but it was all uphill. I have no idea how far I would be able to go on batteries alone. I had a spot of trouble in another, very tree-covered, stretch as the sun was setting. However, I found my planned stop and was fine.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
I came across a great definition of adventure. Adventure is hardship recalled at leisure.
"We hobbits are plain, quiet creatures. Adventures make one late for dinner." Bilbo Baggins.