Defective Bike (Bulls E-Stream EVO AM 4) (< 1 Month Old)

lightrider

New Member
Region
USA
I bought the E-Stream EVO AM 4 from ELV motors less than a month ago and have had nothing but problems. Right out the gate the front brake rotor wasn't true and gears weren't shifting well. Long story short, issues to date:

1. Front brake rotor was warped in 3 spots and had to be trued (still sounds horrible when applying moderate pressure)
2. Derailleur needs replacement
3. Clutch broken
4. Rear wheel ball bearings bad and needs to be replaced (possibly requiring a new wheel)
5. Clicking noise with the motor developed recently (this hasn't been formally acknowledged by dealer service shop because it may be issue #4 that I'm hearing)

I sent a lengthy email to the dealer which was then forwarded to Bulls. A new bike (especially that expensive) shouldn't have this many issues and all signs point to a lemon. I wouldn't feel comfortable with anything less than a replacement / refund which I made clear in the email.

What are my options here to get this resolved quickly so I can get out riding and not waste any more time?
 

ElevenAD

Well-Known Member
Thats really pricey,i would be livid! I don't even know if i would go with the same bike again with so many issues so soon,i think i would get my cash back and move on,plenty of nice options at that price point. Someone here recently mentioned how having a spare bike never hurt and its so true,even if its not the best,makes dealing with headaches like this so much easier when you can still get out ride.
 

Mike TowpathTraveler

Well-Known Member
It's up to the dealer who sold you the bike, to stand by their product and make the repairs under warranty.

But I have to tell you this: a warped rotor and busted rear derailleur can also be caused by operator error by bending the rotor by whatever reason and in the case of the derailleur; improper shifting procedures. Clicking noise? Again, this could be just an improperly adjusted or defective derailleur, for starters.

Park Tools has a great archive of bike repairs online over at YouTube. The folks there have a terrific way of explaining how these bike systems like brakes or gears, work and procedures on how to repair and adjust. This way, you are on the same wavelength as your bike shop. Good luck and let us know how it worked out.

From what I've seen here on line, bike manufacturers, especially the German ones, do not want to have anything to do at all with communicating with the consumer bike rider. They ONLY talk to the authorized bike dealer. This goes for Riese and Muller, Haibike and I would think too, Bulls.
 

Cramer Long

Active Member
Region
USA
It's up to the dealer who sold you the bike, to stand by their product and make the repairs under warranty.

But I have to tell you this: a warped rotor and busted rear derailleur can also be caused by operator error by bending the rotor by whatever reason and in the case of the derailleur; improper shifting procedures. Clicking noise? Again, this could be just an improperly adjusted or defective derailleur, for starters.

Park Tools has a great archive of bike repairs online over at YouTube. The folks there have a terrific way of explaining how these bike systems like brakes or gears, work and procedures on how to repair and adjust. This way, you are on the same wavelength as your bike shop. Good luck and let us know how it worked out.

From what I've seen here on line, bike manufacturers, especially the German ones, do not want to have anything to do at all with communicating with the consumer bike rider. They ONLY talk to the authorized bike dealer. This goes for Riese and Muller, Haibike and I would think too, Bulls.
I agree with you : Most of what he is describing is normal non ebike issues of adjustments . Or so it seems
 

ElevenAD

Well-Known Member
warped and bent break disc,shot rear wheel bearings,clicking motor noises and a broken derailleur are "normal non E-Bike issues of adjustment"? This bike cost $6300 and the guys motor is clicking,it doesnt get any more E-Bike than that! i feel like if someone posted these same issues with a new $3000 Online purchased Made in China bike the reaction would be different but maybe im wrong.
 

Cramer Long

Active Member
Region
USA
warped and bent break disc,shot rear wheel bearings,clicking motor noises and a broken derailleur are "normal non E-Bike issues of adjustment"? This bike cost $6300 and the guys motor is clicking,it doesnt get any more E-Bike than that! i feel like if someone posted these same issues with a new $3000 Online purchased Made in China bike the reaction would be different but maybe im wrong.
Yeah ok . But bad bearings don't click they grind . How did the brake disc get bent as well as the derailleur arm get bent . Plus the clutch ? Hard to believe they took delivery that way . Problem with reading a post like that is you and I knowing what the Bike's condition was when it left the shop at purchase. DIsc brakes don't just suddenly bend . Neither do D-Arms or Clutches . These are all bike problems . Plus most of what he's describing don't just happen . Loud clicking noises that sound like the Motor could very well be the derailleur out of adjust hardly at all . Also the average rider doesn't shift correctly . I hear in many of Courts Videos he puts a lot of time into pointing out how to shift an E-bike . Warning the stress improper shifting puts on a motorized system . Like the guy complaining about his Ebike Breaking Spokes . Turns out he's riding kids on the Trunk Bag rack and handlebars or a Creo ( I think that's the Bike)

Is it possible the OP dumped his bike when New . Bending the Der_Arm . Which led to the other issues as he continued using the Bike ? Just asking
 

lightrider

New Member
Region
USA
I didn’t dump the bike… it was a demo with 290 miles when I bought it and got a slight discount. The brake / gear indexing issues were there from the beginning and was told all new bikes make a slight brake rubbing sound and that it should go away on its own, or worst case to buy organic brake pads. Dealer tried to index the gears and I figured I could use the barrel adjuster to fine tune if needed but to no avail. I make sure to shift gently… I was told the cassette at least looks fine. I’ve put less miles on it than the bike had when I bought it. And yes the clicking noise just started to happen… I was riding flat streets on the way to the trail and it just got progressively worse. Outside of taking the bike home (which dealer helped me load) I’ve never put the bike in a car (part of the reason I bought an ebike is because I’m close enough to trails I can get to trail head and home with motor assistance quickly). Keep in mind I’m also a chill rider… I just cruise trails (33% of distance) in addition to getting to the trail and back (66% of distance), never did any jumps, manuals, etc on this bike
 
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AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
1. It sounds like this is NOT a new bike. It's a demo. God only knows what it's been through. Then there's the potential somebody returned it because of all the issues, and this wonderful dealer has dumped it on to an unsuspecting customer calling it a "demo".
2. It also sounds like the dealer's tech team is clueless. That bike should have been gone over and made as near perfect as possible before it was even offered for sale...
3. Anyone laying out this kind of money for a bike should have PLENTY of previous experience. That doesn't sound like that's the case here. I would think an experienced rider would have gone over the bike and ridden it for a bit before any money changed hands.....

Point being, plenty of blame to go around. I say, give this some time. That will allow the dealer to get it's act together (hopefully). It'll also give the purchaser some time to learn about his new bike....
 

Cramer Long

Active Member
Region
USA
I didn’t dump the bike… it was a demo with 290 miles when I bought it and got a slight discount. The brake / gear indexing issues were there from the beginning and was told all new bikes make a slight brake rubbing sound and that it should go away on its own, or worst case to buy organic brake pads. Dealer tried to index the gears and I figured I could use the barrel adjuster to fine tune if needed but to no avail. I make sure to shift gently… I was told the cassette at least looks fine. I’ve put less miles on it than the bike had when I bought it. And yes the clicking noise just started to happen… I was riding flat streets on the way to the trail and it just got progressively worse. Outside of taking the bike home (which dealer helped me load) I’ve never put the bike in a car (part of the reason I bought an ebike is because I’m close enough to trails I can get to trail head and home with motor assistance quickly). Keep in mind I’m also a chill rider… I just cruise trails (33% of distance) in addition to getting to the trail and back (66% of distance), never did any jumps, manuals, etc on this bike
OK Disc brakes (THE GOOD ONES) are loud at times . That's moisture and rust on the pads . It's in a manner of speaking the nature of the beast . You can't prevent it . Sometimes if you ride alot it goes away . But it's honestly not a big deal. If your bracket for the Rear -D is bent buy a new one . Less then $25 . I have worked on bikes 50 years . I did it for a living while in grad school . SO the clicking noise is more then likely your chain not setting right on the rear derailleur / That noise can get really loud > The good news it's a simple fix . There's a great Video by park tool on how to setup and adjust the rear . BUTTTTT u need a bike stand or you're wasting your time . ( If or when you can afford one get one) If you do any kind of riding distance at all . Adjusting shifts is always going to be an issue from time to time. Because the cable stretches. The best way to fix that clicking is to just loosen the cable and pull it hand tight. As I said though get a stand and watch the PT Video
 

Mike TowpathTraveler

Well-Known Member
Where there is a will..... I needed to adjust my rear derailleur (using the Park Tools videos as guidance, of course). But having the need to git her dun, like now....and the unwillingness to splurge for a heavy duty bike stand, I figured a simple 5 dollar strap from Harbor Freight or Home Depot, run around the saddle rear and over and around a stable overhead (in my case, my backyard boat project tarp frame made of pvc pipe) would do the trick.

Any stable overhead in your garage or a tree limb, will do. Try to secure the front wheel from turning and you're all set to make your adjustments.

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tomjasz

Well-Known Member
the dealer's tech team is clueless.
I'm amazed when speaking to some shops. So many just don't take the time to learn. We give dealer discounts and then get calls from some of them when they're "too busy" to use Google and learn. More and more I'm finding myself suggesting they not sell if they won't learn!