Different Bar for Hybrid

George S.

Well-Known Member
@Ron Bez mentioned some problems with flat bars on a hybrid. I looked at the bar he recommended, but there is spotty availability and I have the thinner bar, the one inch basically.

Amazon had a basic riser bar for $20

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002BW1BS0?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s01

There's not much to it, but I figured my cables would stretch enough for this bar, so not much downside.

Bottom line? This is a much more comfortable ride. I had already raised the bar I had about 4 inch, so this lifts things some more, and the angles are different. I don't get any pains with this bar, or numbness.

People have different theories on how to avoid stresses, but this worked for me. I was thinking of getting some sort of cruiser bike, but this seems close enough. Much cheaper. Sorry @roshan

riser bar.JPG
 

Nirmala

Active Member
I wanted to use one of these, but the cables on my Ui5 will not reach. Fortunately, it already has an adjustable stem, so I get some rise that way.
 

RoyL

Active Member
George, in my conversion of what was basically a mountain bike i started off with those straight handlebars, they were too low and forward, you were supporting a lot of weight on your arms and shoulders.
I got that Riser and these handlebars from our Amazon here http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B002OBKRGU/ref=pe_385721_37038051_TE_3p_dp_1

Makes a world of difference, you`re more upright, not so much weight on your arms and shoulders.
 
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George S.

Well-Known Member
I ride a lot longer on my bike as an electric, and the rough roads seem rougher at higher speeds. It's not that hard to do this. I read what I could find on the internet, mostly user reviews. I'm not sure what matters most, and it may depend on the rider. The grips end up at different angles from a flat and straight bar. The riser bars tend to move the grips back, and they also raise the grips. What I ended up with works quite well, the riser and the 'comfort' bar.

Small bits of advice for the interested:

1) generally the grips are hard to remove. Compressed air works, but I get them off with Windex after prying the inside ends up with something that won't scratch. It takes a while to get the Windex down.

2) the cables you have may not reach far enough. Amazon has a Shimano kit with new brake cables.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0050LUBZ8?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00

The shape of the bars I bought worked well because I have a fat throttle with a speed control. On the flat bar, it would not work with the brakes unless it was twisted way around. Now it is easier to use the speed control button.

I lost a little bit of space, so I can't mount the cell phone on the bar. I could use the phone for directions and to play music, so I might try a bar entender.

There are a few things to consider. With kit bikes, you have to experiment anyway. People get so carried away with speed and power, but little things make a huge difference in how long you can ride and how much fun it will be. Certainly the tires, the seats, and the handlebars make a huge difference. I can't ride without the mirror. Even mounting a bluetooth speaker adds another dimension to riding.
 

tinasdude

Active Member
Thanks for the post and the link. I need that more upright position as well. Those bars have a 40 degree sweep as well, according to Amazon. Been looking at different bars, and those are definitely worth a 2nd look.
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
I ended up using a 4 inch extension and then the 5 inch riser from that Amazon link. I did it after riding a Townie bike and seeing how well their handlebars seem to work, at least for comfort. Ron had a great explanation of why flat bars are bad, but I think he is still a performance rider. My approach is probably giving up performance. My handlebars are pretty jammed up with stuff, so not much of the bars left to see. :)
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
I ride a lot longer on my bike as an electric, and the rough roads seem rougher at higher speeds. It's not that hard to do this. I read what I could find on the internet, mostly user reviews. I'm not sure what matters most, and it may depend on the rider. The grips end up at different angles from a flat and straight bar. The riser bars tend to move the grips back, and they also raise the grips. What I ended up with works quite well, the riser and the 'comfort' bar.

Small bits of advice for the interested:

1) generally the grips are hard to remove. Compressed air works, but I get them off with Windex after prying the inside ends up with something that won't scratch. It takes a while to get the Windex down.

2) the cables you have may not reach far enough. Amazon has a Shimano kit with new brake cables.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0050LUBZ8?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00

The shape of the bars I bought worked well because I have a fat throttle with a speed control. On the flat bar, it would not work with the brakes unless it was twisted way around. Now it is easier to use the speed control button.

I lost a little bit of space, so I can't mount the cell phone on the bar. I could use the phone for directions and to play music, so I might try a bar entender.

There are a few things to consider. With kit bikes, you have to experiment anyway. People get so carried away with speed and power, but little things make a huge difference in how long you can ride and how much fun it will be. Certainly the tires, the seats, and the handlebars make a huge difference. I can't ride without the mirror. Even mounting a bluetooth speaker adds another dimension to riding.

RAM mounts can be fit to all kinds of weird places.
If you don't gunk up the bars with residue from stuff, compressed air (compressor tank not spray can) slides them right on and off with no effort or trouble. 10 seconds on or off.
Bike or motorcyle.
 

John Dombrowski

Active Member
Hi John,

They work great for me. I too had the some numbness and general upper body discomfort. No problem with bars even with my much firmer riding tires. I got them here:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002PTMP0C?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00
Took all of a couple of minutes to install, no issues with the cables. View attachment 5554 View attachment 5555

Thanks Ron, but this amazon link seems to show a different bar than what you have on in the pics?
 

Ron Bez

Member
That's them, Pro Torq space bar, I think she will like them. I have had a few people that use straight bars ride my bike and be surprised by the ergonomics. I stand up to crank up hills without downshifting and find the balance with these bars great. Good luck!
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
Just a quck point that bar/hand position is a very personal thing and what works great for me might suck for you.
I've tried 8-10 sets of bars on my current 3 bikes and those nice pull backs are extremely comfortable for me until I get to about 10 miles and then they start playing heck with my back, causing a lot of lower back pain, as they change the upper/lower body positioning and I can't peddle in that setup for long. What feels great SITTING, isn't great for peddling always.
The lean forward to reach flat bars does tend to put your lower body in the best position for power peddling and taking pressure off the lower back. FWIW
 

tinasdude

Active Member
Jones bars are pricey. And flat. You can get them up with a riser. Multiple hand positions. Ride cruiser or in a more forward position. Lots of space for STUFF!
 

tinasdude

Active Member
@Ron Bez mentioned some problems with flat bars on a hybrid. I looked at the bar he recommended, but there is spotty availability and I have the thinner bar, the one inch basically.

Amazon had a basic riser bar for $20

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002BW1BS0?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s01

There's not much to it, but I figured my cables would stretch enough for this bar, so not much downside.

Bottom line? This is a much more comfortable ride. I had already raised the bar I had about 4 inch, so this lifts things some more, and the angles are different. I don't get any pains with this bar, or numbness.

People have different theories on how to avoid stresses, but this worked for me. I was thinking of getting some sort of cruiser bike, but this seems close enough. Much cheaper. Sorry @roshan

View attachment 4649
you must have created a run on these bars. OOS on Amazon
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
Amazon seems to have dozens of bars, too many to sort out, but they were selling these and shipping fast. I'm getting annoyed with how much stress gets transmitted up the fork at ebike speeds. A real 'Townie" configuration works, but it's hard on the back. I've been riding a non-motor mountain bike with a very basic suspension fork. That works, but the speeds are much lower. A mass market stem suspension would be great for ebikes. But some combination of damping and arm position is worth exploring. The faster these bike go, the more the stresses of the road are going to be absorbed by the poor (rapidly aging) rider. :( You fix one thing and you get inefficient. Some of these paths I ride are so broken up, a 10 mph speed is about right. And then there's the chip seal...
 

tinasdude

Active Member
I think a suspension fork is needed for most e-bikes. Another member got one for his Juggernaut and seems pleased with the results. Non fat suspension forks are more readily available at a reasonable price