Disc Brakes and Pads

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Bedding new pads is recommended for all pad types. It is necessary for sinthered/metallic pads like the Specialized J04s, but becomes less necessary with lower metal content. Organic resin pads, like the Specialized J03s you're using can do without being bedded in but the braking power will be reduced for a bit while the pads surfaces wear to the rotors.
OK, I got a bit sloppy. Pulled the pads to check wear, putting all the parts in a magnetic tray. Everything was fine up to the last step, installing the safety clip. It popped out of the small needle nose pliers and, predictibly, it disappeared onto the concrete shop floor. Never did find it. It's fine without the clip, until it's not. I picked up a replacement clip at the local hardware store, having to bend it 90 degrees. It's not really the right size, but for $0.19, it's working. Went by yesterday to get the right sized clip, but new 'social distancing' rules were in place. The line went out the door. Found the correct clips online for more $, but no waiting in line for almost the right part. Ordered a couple of spares, too.
 

TS25

Well-Known Member
So I think I can be happy with my cotter pin system.

If I drop that and can't find it afterwards it should be high time to visit my optician as soon as he reopens again. :)
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
It's been just about 500 miles since I installed the new Kool Stop KS-D635K brake pads on my Vado 5. The original Shimano organic pads lasted just 500 miles in our hilly terrain so I've been checking these new ones regularly.

The front pads wore the fastest. I pulled the front Kool Stop pads this afternoon for an "apples to apples" comparison with the originals. The good news is that there is substantial pad left.

20200617_161528.jpg

New KS-D635K pad on the left, pad with 500 miles on the right.

I could see a small amount of wear on the worn pad as compared to a new pad. The new pad/heatsink thickness averages 4.01mm, measuring at each corner. The worn pad averages 3.96mm, less than 2% pad wear in 500 miles. Even allowing for the spring arm thickness that sit alongside the pad, I'm expecting over 2,500 miles from these pads. Others have reported comparable life from these pads. Quite an improvement over the original.

These pads are described as 'semi-metallic' and like sinthered metallic pads they do require bedding-in to get them to quiet down and reach peak stopping power. Once properly bedded, they're still not as quiet as the organic pads, put the minor noise is worth the extra life these pads are delivering. Besides, who doesn't like red heat sink fins on their brake calipers...🤣
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
It's been just about 500 miles since I installed the new Kool Stop KS-D635K brake pads on my Vado 5. The original Shimano organic pads lasted just 500 miles in our hilly terrain so I've been checking these new ones regularly. The front pads wore the fastest. I pulled the front Kool Stop pads this afternoon for an "apples to apples" comparison with the originals. The good news is that there is substantial pad left.

View attachment 55872 New KS-D635K pad on the left, pad with 500 miles on the right.
I could see a small amount of wear on the worn pad as compared to a new pad. The new pad/heatsink thickness averages 4.01mm, measuring at each corner. The worn pad averages 3.96mm, less than 2% pad wear in 500 miles. Even allowing for the spring arm thickness that sit alongside the pad, I'm expecting over 2,500 miles from these pads. Others have reported comparable life from these pads. Quite an improvement over the original.

These pads are described as 'semi-metallic' and like sinthered metallic pads they do require bedding-in to get them to quiet down and reach peak stopping power. Once properly bedded, they're still not as quiet as the organic pads, put the minor noise is worth the extra life these pads are delivering. Besides, who doesn't like red heat sink fins on their brake calipers...🤣

Nice review... did you have to change the rotors when you changed from organic resin to sintered metallic pads?
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Nice review... did you have to change the rotors when you changed from organic resin to sintered metallic pads?
I did change the front rotor from 1800mm to 203mm and moved the original 180mm to the rear to replace the original 160mm. So, 1 new rotor in the front, 1 original in the rear. Cleaned them today when checking the front pads. Nice and smooth, no scratches.

Just to be clear, I had tried Shimano sinthered metallic pads as per my MTBing sons' recommendations. After 60 miles and numerous techniques I gave up trying to get them bedded-in so they'd stop squealing. I then went the Kool Stop pads which the manufacturer describes as "forged aluminum back with cooling fins and high performance organic compound". Some online reviewers describe them as semi-metallic pads. You can see threads of what I'd call copper in the pads. I believe it's the combination of the large heat sink and the 'copper' that increases the pad life so much while avoiding the squealing many report with true sinthered metallic pads.
 

Captain Slow

Well-Known Member
On my Cervelo which doesn't have a motor, light and rim brakes my brake pads last so long that I have no idea how long before they wear out, but it's a really long time.

My Juiced CCS has by far the shortest life for brake pads for any bike I've ever owned. I'd say I get roughly 1,500 km's out of a set of front pads and 3,000 km's on a set of rear pads. I use metallic pads. I think the pads don't last long because average speed on the bike is higher than any other bike I have, it's the heaviest bike and my commute to and from work has some hills.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
On my Cervelo which doesn't have a motor, light and rim brakes my brake pads last so long that I have no idea how long before they wear out, but it's a really long time.

My Juiced CCS has by far the shortest life for brake pads for any bike I've ever owned. I'd say I get roughly 1,500 km's out of a set of front pads and 3,000 km's on a set of rear pads. I use metallic pads. I think the pads don't last long because average speed on the bike is higher than any other bike I have, it's the heaviest bike and my commute to and from work has some hills.
It's the same for our mech Cannondale Quicks. It's years between pad replacements for their V-brakes. I'd guess maybe 3,000 miles. I was quite surprised now fast the front pads on the new ebike's disc brakes wore out, just 500 miles for the original organic pads. Looking forward to much longer life with the new pads.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
It must really depend how one rides their e-bike. My brother made me aware how rarely we need to press brake levers on our typical rides. I guess the brake pads in our e-bikes will last for very long time. It is different for hilly areas or the city commute.
 

Jimbo08

Active Member
I commute 12km each way, with one big, long hill each way. So far the stock pads are plenty good on my 2020 Vado 5, but I will replace with Kool Stop ones when needed, or finned Shimano ones. I had over 3000km on the KoolStops on another ebike when I sold it, with plenty of wear to go.
I had Formula brakes on my first ebike- squeeled no matter what pad I installed. Don't remember what model of brake, but they were terrific despite the noise. Magura's were good too, with KoolStop pads installed. Shimano XT work fine, but resin pads wear a little bit faster. Worth the price though for good braking.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Are TRP Q20.11 Brake Pads Compatible With Any Other Brand/Model?

It has turned out the TRP Q20.11 brake pads for my Vado got completely worn out. No online store in Europe seems to have them in stock. Are the pads replaceable with another brand/model?

1603624132165.png
 

TS25

Well-Known Member
Are TRP Q20.11 Brake Pads Compatible With Any Other Brand/Model?

It has turned out the TRP Q20.11 brake pads for my Vado got completely worn out. No online store in Europe seems to have them in stock. Are the pads replaceable with another brand/model?

Take a look at your brake rotor: which TRP model?
 

TS25

Well-Known Member
Zurich, 180 mm rotor. The original part is Q20.11, red.
That isn't the complete rotor model code. Have a look at your rotor.
It should read TR180-xx (29 ?) or similar. xx is the model code for your rotor you got to find out.

Q20.11 is the code for the brake pads, but you're searching for other brake pads that are allowed for your rotor model.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
Just an update on the longevity question. I have added over 1,000 more miles on my Haibike Trekking original pads since I responded on April 22 on page 1. Now at 4,846 miles. I'll probably change them at 5,000 miles this winter.