Do I need new pads?

Enargins

Member
I have a hard time telling when a brake pad needs to be replaced. Can someone take a look at this picture and tell me if you think the pad needs to be replaced? Thanks!
7xDWIBww.jpeg
 

jim6b

Active Member
They look okay, to my eye.

Having said that, I would order replacements now as there maybe an availability problem if you wait until they must be replaced.

Also there are Park videos showing how to determine if your pads need replacement.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
I have a hard time telling when a brake pad needs to be replaced. Can someone take a look at this picture and tell me if you think the pad needs to be replaced? Thanks!View attachment 72111
It's a bit hard to tell what the actual material layers are from the pic. The best thing to do is pull the pads and measure the thickness of the pad material. Most manufacturer's recommend a minimum thickness of 0.5mm.
 

Enargins

Member
It's a bit hard to tell what the actual material layers are from the pic. The best thing to do is pull the pads and measure the thickness of the pad material. Most manufacturer's recommend a minimum thickness of 0.5mm.
Thanks! that's interesting. in a park tools video, they said change at 1 mm, and that 3 business cards stacked on top of each other = 1 mm, so you could use that to tell. But that's good to know that you could go down to 0.5 mm.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
It's a bit hard to tell what the actual material layers are from the pic. The best thing to do is pull the pads and measure the thickness of the pad material. Most manufacturer's recommend a minimum thickness of 0.5mm.
yeah 0.5mm is good thickness to replace.

I used to try to use all the pad, but it was impossible because this metal spring thing will interfere with the disc.

Shimano Disc Brake Pads - K03S Resin - Bike24
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
A good indication -- I think -- of the last moment to replace the pads is when the brake lever suddenly feels like it had a deep sag on breaking. Here is a totally worn pad:

1606037803957.png
 

RandallS

Well-Known Member
Just back from LBS and heading out to garage to do my first ever pad change.

Pads = Check
Gloves = Check
Pliers = Check
Plastic tire levers = Check
Isopropyl = check
Paper Towels = Check
Bike repair rack = Check (makeshift)
Space heater = Check :)
Vest and jacket = Check
Tablet (for Youtube videos) = Check
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Just back from LBS and heading out to garage to do my first ever pad change.

Pads = Check
Gloves = Check
Pliers = Check
Plastic tire levers = Check
Isopropyl = check
Paper Towels = Check
Bike repair rack = Check (makeshift)
Space heater = Check :)
Vest and jacket = Check
Tablet (for Youtube videos) = Check
Here's a good video to watch
 

linklemming

Well-Known Member
A good indication -- I think -- of the last moment to replace the pads is when the brake lever suddenly feels like it had a deep sag on breaking. Here is a totally worn pad:

View attachment 72132
Thanks for posting a pic.

One thing to note about this is that the pad wear isnt always 100% even, so while the OP picture looks ok, the actual wear could be different in several spots due to less than perfect pad alignment. Pads also tend to wear more at the back even(where the disc first touches the pad as shown in this pic) when properly aligned .

The inside and outside pads might wear differently as well duw to pad alignment.

All this is likely only an issue when the pad is pretty worn down though, the OP picture looks fine
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
Just back from LBS and heading out to garage to do my first ever pad change.

Pads = Check
Gloves = Check
Pliers = Check
Plastic tire levers = Check
Isopropyl = check
Paper Towels = Check
Bike repair rack = Check (makeshift)
Space heater = Check :)
Vest and jacket = Check
Tablet (for Youtube videos) = Check
Plastic tire levers? You're going to take off a tire to remove brake pads?
 

RandallS

Well-Known Member
Thanks for posting a pic.

One thing to note about this is that the pad wear isnt always 100% even, so while the OP picture looks ok, the actual wear could be different in several spots due to less than perfect pad alignment. Pads also tend to wear more at the back even(where the disc first touches the pad as shown in this pic) when properly aligned .

The inside and outside pads might wear differently as well duw to pad alignment.

All this is likely only an issue when the pad is pretty worn down though, the OP picture looks fine
I will post a really good example of uneven wear later tonight or tomorrow. Just finished doing my rear pads and I think i caught them JUST in time.
 

RandallS

Well-Known Member
You are using the levers after you remove the old pads but before you put the new ones in. But then again, I have very limited experience doing this. Quantity = once ! I just followed what I found on YouTube.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Useful tool to depress the brake pistons before fitting pads. You want to use plastic, not metal to do that.

 

RandallS

Well-Known Member
Ok, here goes the pad replacement from yesterday.
First off - I think I was maybe a touch late. Disc brakes are new to me on a bicycle.

These pads are toast - and should have been replaced about 200km ago I think.
That's Lesson #1.

RearPadsNov22.JPG

Rotor is slightly scored, and I'll order one and change it out. $40 Canadian is one of the cheaper lessons I've learned lately.

RearRotorNov22.JPG

Process - first I put the bike up on my makeshift maintenance stand. This is borrowed from a friend as I have a platform hitch rack.

20201122_145016.jpg

Then wheel off.

20201122_150010.jpg 20201122_153551.jpg 20201122_153543.jpg

I didn't take any picture of removal, but the above show the new pads and spring in place.
NOTE - the spring is a complete PITA to deal with, and in those photos, it's not sitting correctly.
I was using the shipping wedge to reset spacing and it wasn't right (and didn't feel right) and trying to replace wheel confirmed it wasn't right...

Took it apart again, reset the spring and put it back together - much better.
The process of getting that right are lessons 2 through 11... and wheel slid in relatively easily.

As the old pads had uneven wear, I thought I might be best served to do a caliper realignment.
So loosened the bolts, squeezed and held lever to centre the caliper, and refastened and retorqued the caliper.

My lever helper:
20201122_162259.jpg

All in all, pretty simple. I really took my time and it took about 45 minutes. That was about 5 minutes video review, 5 minutes of disassembly (including rear wheel removal), 30 minutes of fiddling around re-compressing pistons and trying to get spring and new pads assembly back in place and 5 minutes realigning caliper.

Next time, I expect to be well under 10 minutes as this really is a pretty simple procedure. BTW - I did use this opportunity to clean up the frame as it was rather dirty.
And whoever invented the derailleur lock should get a Knighthood or Medal or at least a beer of their choice - could have used that feature a few times over the last 50 years!