Does it exist..??? A fat-tire bike (generally for sandy, or snowy roads) with the power of a serious e-MTB (apt for steep hills, off-roads) ..??

Jon A

Member
Region
USA
I follow you Jon A, as a good transporter which goes all the way at all times, a smooth fat bike rider it should be..!! :cool:🍀
Good luck, I think if you end up with a Hydra you will be quite happy with it!

"We have received some feedback that these do have some self steer-- The tread is fairly stiff to last longer on pavement."

Noteworthy is the fact the knobby tires don't seem to have this self steering problem. My bet is the difference between street tread with their big contact area on the pavement surface, and the knobby type with much less contact area, is just enough to cause this issue.
I think there might be something to that. The tires designed for good traction offroad need a supple casing so they can deform over uneven surfaces, a road-oriented tire maybe not so much. Anyway, I think you'll be happy with 27.5+, lots of tire choices in those sizes as well.
 

K PierreR

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
If QuietKat ships overseas you can get everything you want in one bike. I have ridden one and they are high quality.
 

Jon A

Member
Region
USA
Speaking of rolling resistance, etc, I thought this was an interesting comparison between a fatbike and an XC racebike:


No, it wasn't a perfectly controlled scientific measurement, but I thought it was a pretty interesting real-world comparison that may be helpful to those worried a fatbike will be "slow," especially on gravel or offroad. The fatbike has 27.5X4" Vanhelga's I spoke about--certainly not the lowest rolling resistance fat tires available, but not bad. One thing he doesn't mention--he's running the Vanhelga on the rear backwards. This is typically done on a fatbike to increase forward traction in deep snow, but it comes at the cost of an increase in rolling resistance. Had he been running it the other way, the fatbike may have done even better.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Just to clarify my own position/experience regarding "fatties" maybe -

I have NO issues with a fat tire (4"+) when used in the dirt, or anywhere but pavement really (go fo it!). It's the grip of a 4" street tread tire on pavement that causes the issues. That, combined with the difference in rolling resistance when comparing a fat pavement tire to one, say in the 2"-3" widths, now often referred to as "plus" sizes. I purposely compared them first hand with an open mind - a mind that's always on the search for something that works better. MY opinion is that the fatties work well in the dirt. On pavement the fat "knobby" tires work good too - but they have a tendency toward noisy (roar!), and quick wear. To rid yourself of the noise, you go to a street tread - which is where you start picking up the self steering issues, with varying degrees of bad depending on the pressure you're running. Fatties w/street tread WILL work OK at higher air pressures, but at that point you've lost the advantage most ae looking for in the way they ride. Fom a ride standpoint, at higher pessures (whatever max psi is for your fat tire) you might just as well have 2" tires. The compromise that seems to work well on ALL surfaces (but clearly not BEST) is the 2.4-2.8 "plus" sizes - in 27.5 tires anyway. 29'ers may be a different case. I'm too old to mess with them, they make the bike too tall! FWIW, -Al
 

TForan

Well-Known Member
Just to clarify my own position/experience regarding "fatties" maybe -

I have NO issues with a fat tire (4"+) when used in the dirt, or anywhere but pavement really (go fo it!). It's the grip of a 4" street tread tire on pavement that causes the issues. That, combined with the difference in rolling resistance when comparing a fat pavement tire to one, say in the 2"-3" widths, now often referred to as "plus" sizes. I purposely compared them first hand with an open mind - a mind that's always on the search for something that works better. MY opinion is that the fatties work well in the dirt. On pavement the fat "knobby" tires work good too - but they have a tendency toward noisy (roar!), and quick wear. To rid yourself of the noise, you go to a street tread - which is where you start picking up the self steering issues, with varying degrees of bad depending on the pressure you're running. Fatties w/street tread WILL work OK at higher air pressures, but at that point you've lost the advantage most ae looking for in the way they ride. Fom a ride standpoint, at higher pessures (whatever max psi is for your fat tire) you might just as well have 2" tires. The compromise that seems to work well on ALL surfaces (but clearly not BEST) is the 2.4-2.8 "plus" sizes - in 27.5 tires anyway. 29'ers may be a different case. I'm too old to mess with them, they make the bike too tall! FWIW, -Al
Regardless of pressure a street tread fat tire offers more stability on bad roads and streets. I run 3.5 inch tires and they are very forgiving on road irregularities. Would never go back unless I moved to where there is an abundance of smooth roads, which isn't the case in Northern Mi.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Regardless of pressure a street tread fat tire offers more stability on bad roads and streets. I run 3.5 inch tires and they are very forgiving on road irregularities. Would never go back unless I moved to where there is an abundance of smooth roads, which isn't the case in Northern Mi.
Had a place 3-4 miles SE of Gaylord for many years. I know exactly what you're talking about. All the gas lines in that area to explore though, more than offsets the condition of the roads! Brings back a LOT of memories on quads and sleds. Enjoy!
 

TForan

Well-Known Member
Had a place 3-4 miles SE of Gaylord for many years. I know exactly what you're talking about. All the gas lines in that area to explore though, more than offsets the condition of the roads! Brings back a LOT of memories on quads and sleds. Enjoy!
We have over 50 miles of paved trails , which is right outside my door but cutting through town, the roads are pretty bad.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
We have over 50 miles of paved trails , which is right outside my door but cutting through town, the roads are pretty bad.
Paved = packed limestone?
 

TForan

Well-Known Member

Attachments

  • tart.jpg
    tart.jpg
    60.8 KB · Views: 20
  • grand-traverse-bike-tours.jpg
    grand-traverse-bike-tours.jpg
    80.8 KB · Views: 18

john peck

Well-Known Member
As much as I would probably enjoy the more comfortable ride of fat tires, I don´t need them to
ride in most terrain other than snow or loose sand. I´m quite certain I get considerably more range
on regular tires that are less expensive than fats. My bike is a daily driver. Fats would be fun for
a purely off-road, recreational experience....as long as fats don´t become flats.
 

TForan

Well-Known Member
As much as I would probably enjoy the more comfortable ride of fat tires, I don´t need them to
ride in most terrain other than snow or loose sand. I´m quite certain I get considerably more range
on regular tires that are less expensive than fats. My bike is a daily driver. Fats would be fun for
a purely off-road, recreational experience....as long as fats don´t become flats.
They are great on the street if you want a big, long wheelbase stable bike. They need the torque of the Bafang Ultra to perform , IMO.
 

TForan

Well-Known Member
How did you feel about the Bosch bike vs the Ultra?
This was 4 years ago ago, so it wasn't Bosch's latest motor. But it was like comparing a six cylinder in the old days to a big block. No comparison, really and the Felt Outfitter was several thousand dollars more.