Does size matter

Cranks

New Member
I am in the market for a ebike, but the truth is I am heavy. My concern is investing lots of money and the bike frame or motor can't handle the load (me). I want to become more active to get to a healthier body but need help with inclines right now. I am around 270 lbs. Does anyone have info on a bike brand/model that would accommodate me? Thank you for reading. May the wind always be at your back.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Cranks,
I'm 70, 6'2" and 315 or so. For the record, I enjoy riding for the heck of it. It's fun! Exercise is NOT my primary objective. Being outside in the fresh air is much more important here.

I would suggest you avoid a direct drive bike, staying with geared hub and mid drives for their gearing advantage (to help assure you get to the top of any bigger hills). I would also recommend a motor with 500 watts minimum, and preferably a 750 watt for the same reason (minmize concern regarding hills).

After that, you should be good to go with just about any bike. RARELY do you ever hear about bike frames that have cracked or broken.
 

Dewey

Well-Known Member
RARELY do you ever hear about bike frames that have cracked or broken.
I would add have your bike assembled by a bike shop, even if you buy online, they can check the brakes and make sure a hub motor wheel is true with correct spoke tension. Also follow the manufacturer manual regarding seat post height, RadPower Bikes for example occasionally suffer from broken spokes or break the frame around the seat collar, reportedly this is due to owners extending the seatpost above the max line on the seatpost. Source: https://www.radowners.com/index.php...l?PHPSESSID=19v5s8gkdg9e8p9v25fjj5tup3#msg487
 
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Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Cranks,
... RARELY do you ever hear about bike frames that have cracked or broken.
That's probably because the rider is not likely to survive a catastrophic frame failure at speed. If you do a Google Search a number of fairly alarming pictures come up. Even if it is fairly rare a catastrophic failure is going to be, well, catastrophic and it is worth the time and effort to avoid it.

If you shop around, there are a fair number of e-bike brands and models that have substantial weight ratings. Also most any e-cargo bike will easily carry your weight. With a few exceptions, most e-bike frames are rated from 220-250lbs of rider, and there is enough slop in the design that you should be fine. if you don't ride down flights of stairs or off of high curbs you should be fine.

My other suggestion is that you have a good relationship with a local bike shop that can periodically inspect your frame. Even the very best frames can accumulate damage over time that can lead to catastrophic failure. This is exponentially more true for a folding bike or for a full-suspension mountain bike, and you should be somewhat more concerned about step-through designs as opposed to full diamonds (which are a lot stronger). Have the bike shop inspect the wheels while they are at it.
 

Cranks

New Member
Cranks,
I'm 70, 6'2" and 315 or so. For the record, I enjoy riding for the heck of it. It's fun! Exercise is NOT my primary objective. Being outside in the fresh air is much more important here.

I would suggest you avoid a direct drive bike, staying with geared hub and mid drives for their gearing advantage (to help assure you get to the top of any bigger hills). I would also recommend a motor with 500 watts minimum, and preferably a 750 watt for the same reason (minmize concern regarding hills).

After that, you should be good to go with just about any bike. RARELY do you ever hear about bike frames that have cracked or broken.
Thank you very much, I will use your suggestions to help guide me.
 

Cranks

New Member
That's probably because the rider is not likely to survive a catastrophic frame failure at speed. If you do a Google Search a number of fairly alarming pictures come up. Even if it is fairly rare a catastrophic failure is going to be, well, catastrophic and it is worth the time and effort to avoid it.

If you shop around, there are a fair number of e-bike brands and models that have substantial weight ratings. Also most any e-cargo bike will easily carry your weight. With a few exceptions, most e-bike frames are rated from 220-250lbs of rider, and there is enough slop in the design that you should be fine. if you don't ride down flights of stairs or off of high curbs you should be fine.

My other suggestion is that you have a good relationship with a local bike shop that can periodically inspect your frame. Even the very best frames can accumulate damage over time that can lead to catastrophic failure. This is exponentially more true for a folding bike or for a full-suspension mountain bike, and you should be somewhat more concerned about step-through designs as opposed to full diamonds (which are a lot stronger). Have the bike shop inspect the wheels while they are at it.
Wow I hadn't considered your info, thank you will use this to help my decision.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
I am in the market for a ebike, but the truth is I am heavy. My concern is investing lots of money and the bike frame or motor can't handle the load (me). I want to become more active to get to a healthier body but need help with inclines right now. I am around 270 lbs. Does anyone have info on a bike brand/model that would accommodate me? Thank you for reading. May the wind always be at your back.
Specialized publishes load specs for their bikes, as I'm sure other major manufacturers do. The Specialized load ratings are summarized by model starting on page 8 of the attached Owner's Manual supplement. Depending on your intended riding conditions they offer several ebike models that are rated to a 300lb load. I'd suggest test riding these models, and similar ones by other companies, talk to your LBS about your needs and ask questions here. You'll find an ebike that is a good fit for you.

As an aside, going with an appropriately rated bike will give you warranty coverage, not just on the frame but the other components as well; wheels, drive train, etc.
 

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Lantley

New Member
I am also in the big boy camp. I just purchased a Pedego E bike. With upgraded rims they have models rated for 350 #.
Operating the bike within its stated ratings avoids any warranty issues should you suffer a frame crack.
E-Bikes are too expensive to ignore or gamble with the warranty.

Pedego Electric Bikes are designed with a maximum weight capacity of 250 pounds (113 kg) for most models. When bikes are equipped with the Magnesium Wheels upgrade, the weight capacity increases to 350 pounds
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
My yubabike left has a weight capacity of 200 kg, or 440 lb.
If one is riding in road bike position, head forward back flat, then those bikes even out the tire load. If one sits up straight on the hips as I do, cruiser position, regular bikes cruisers & MTB's load the back tire more than the front. The stretch frame cargo bikes solve this problem by putting 6" extra frame behind the seat, to load more of the rider's weight on the front. I'm only 170 lb, but with 94 lb bike+battery+motor+ tools+tubes+rain gear and 80 lb groceries, my bike can hit the rim on the back tire (2.1") if I don't keep it aired up to the max. That is 330 lb gross weight. You'll see left my battery & motor are hung on the front. Fat tires are bigger, but don't allow 60 psi tire pressure the way my kenda 2.1" tires do.
My bodaboda is an aluminum frame bike. Competing models come from xtracycle, kona ute (the original stretch frame), magnum, m2s, radwagon (lots of loose spokes reported) pedego (expensive) reiss & Muller (expensive). In the super heavy steel frame bikes for a lot of camping gear plus a big rider, surlybikes has no equal. They do have a stretch frame cargo model.