Drop Bar conversion on a base model Turbo?

Warren Ashton

New Member
Hello all! New to the forum, but I've been reading and researching ebikes for months!

I'm about to move to the suburbs and begin a 60 km (37.3 mi) daily commute (round trip). I've always ridden and preferred road bikes, but it's been tricky to find an ebike with drop bars. I found the Haibikes, but I think I've been scared off of mid-mount ebikes due to not wanting to have to buy a new chain once a week (potentially, considering the distance I'll be covering).

I recently test rode a Specialized Turbo X and quite enjoyed it. Then I got the idea to just get the base model Turbo, and spend the price difference on converting to drop bars. From what I've been able to find, it is theoretically possible to use Deore with road bike components (like a CX bike).

Anyone have any input/suggestions? Perhaps a better solution is to buy a steel tourer/cx bike and throw on a BionX kit? Thanks in advance!
 

pxpaulx

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure why you are dismissing a mid drive without a second thought?
Converting a road bike with something stronger might be more stress than the bike is designed for.

If you are set on the specialized I'm sure a shop could provide some guidance on a conversion.

If you haven't looked at other brands, bh easy motion might have a couple models that could suit your needs as well, and they do both mid a hub drive bikes.
 
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J.R.

Well-Known Member
Finding brake levers with motor inhibitors is usually the problem when using drop bars. There's also the limited space for ebike display and controls.
 

Warren Ashton

New Member
According to everything I've read (so far), the mid drive bikes seem to put a lot of additional stress on the chain. I was figuring, if a chain is supposed to last 2500-3000 km on a non-electric bike, then I'm already going to be potentially changing the chain once a month due to the distance I will be commuting:

60 km x 5 days/week x 52 weeks = 15,600 km / yr

If I take really good care, and they last 3000 km (which is unlikely, considering I live in perpetually rainy Vancouver, BC), that's 5+ chains / yr. If they last half as long on a mid-drive, that's a new chain each month (along with presumably having to change cassettes and other drive components more often as well).

But perhaps I'm wrong! I'd love to be! I've had my eyes on the Haibike Race/Superrace for a while now!
 

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
Finding brake levers with motor inhibitors is usually the problem when using drop bars. There's also the limited space for ebike display and controls.
Motor inhibitor is not required for Specialized since it is a hub motor. The Turbo uses an SRAM X7 10 speed rear derailleur and Formula C1 hydraulic disk brakes, so the biggest issue would be getting a workable brake/shifter mechanism. The control panel could be attached to the horizontal part of the drop bar using a clamp the way I did on my Turbo.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Motor inhibitor is not required for Specialized since it is a hub motor. The Turbo uses an SRAM X7 10 speed rear derailleur and Formula C1 hydraulic disk brakes, so the biggest issue would be getting a workable brake/shifter mechanism. The control panel could be attached to the horizontal part of the drop bar using a clamp the way I did on my Turbo.
Then the Turbo would be a better candidate than most. I think most systems from Stromer, BH and BionX currently do use brake inhibitors.

There is this BH Easy Motion Neo Race in the for sale section, that's been converted to drop bars already.

Thread No Longer Exists

Nice bike with only 77 miles on it and only $1200.00
 

pxpaulx

Well-Known Member
Wow, can't go wrong with that! Easy motion bikes usually go past twenty mph to around 25 before the motor cuts out. Check court's review page to verify that though as it can differ bike to bike.
 

Warren Ashton

New Member
That is nice, but I'd still need to upgrade the brakes (gotta have disc brakes here in Vancouver!), which means also having to upgrade wheels, brakes, shifters (hydraulic compatible), etc. Also, after converting USD to CAD, adding packing/shipping, import tax/duty, etc, I'll probably be back up to the price of the Turbo, and have no warranty.

I'll check out my LBS and see what they have to say.
 

rocketman

New Member
That is nice, but I'd still need to upgrade the brakes (gotta have disc brakes here in Vancouver!), which means also having to upgrade wheels, brakes, shifters (hydraulic compatible), etc. Also, after converting USD to CAD, adding packing/shipping, import tax/duty, etc, I'll probably be back up to the price of the Turbo, and have no warranty.

I'll check out my LBS and see what they have to say.
I just got in from my first ride w/my new aero bars on my 2015 Turbo X. AllI can say is WOW!
It's he Turbo X taken to the next level!
Very comfortable. Cheap and good quality aero bars from Nashbar($35). Slices thru the wind like butter.
26-27 mph in comfort.
Btw...no cable, brakes, wheel swaps, etc.
 

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
I just got in from my first ride w/my new aero bars on my 2015 Turbo X. AllI can say is WOW!
It's he Turbo X taken to the next level!
Very comfortable. Cheap and good quality aero bars from Nashbar($35). Slices thru the wind like butter.
26-27 mph in comfort.
Btw...no cable, brakes, wheel swaps, etc.
Pictures!
 

Hong

Active Member
I think I've been scared off of mid-mount ebikes due to not wanting to have to buy a new chain once a week (potentially, considering the distance I'll be covering).
I think you need to do more research. The chain wear is going to be more than a regular bike, but once a week is just silly.

I'd rather ride a mid-drive road bike than a hub-motor conversion. The parts alone would be $500 and you'll have a lot of headaches.