Drowning in a sea of choices, throw me a life raft!!!!!

Whatdevs

New Member
Region
USA
City
West Sacramento
Hello,
Perhaps my story may be a 'life raft' in a sea of choices. : )

I road a Trek Carbon 'acoustic' Hybrid and enjoyed it. One day I went to my LBS for some parts, while waiting and looking over the e-bikes
(I'd done that prior). My sales rep "Why don't you take the Trek out for a ride. You're got time." Ok, Why not ? : )

So off I went on the Trek XM700 Commuter. I rode for 20+ minutes and knew in the first 10 minutes this e-Bike was for me ! I could
feel it. Total happiness !

I'd never been on an e-Bike in my life, I'd never 'drowned' in a sea of choices because I'd never looked. I was
happy with my 'acoustic' Trek Hybrid, but after that short ride I know I had to have that XM 700. I returned to my LBS and bought the
bike on the spot.

Best biking decision I've ever made. That was three years and 7000 miles ago. Even today, every ride day is like Christmas morning.

Since your interest is a Mountain bike, I'll share. My original intent was and is to ride flat trails (rails to trails) and slightly gritty. Since my
XM 700 is a commuter, I used it on the rails to trails gravel, but felt somewhat insecure, so...

I bought a Trek Powerfly 7 hardtail e-MTB without ever riding it. I trusted my LBS. What kind of nut does that ! : ) Me. I could not
be happier with the Powerfly Love It !! It will climb a brick wall, is stable and so much fun. Honestly if I were to do it all over again
the Powerfly 7 would be my only e-Bike. It's great on or off the trail for my style of riding....

I'm not suggesting my approach will work for you. We all have to do what we're comfortable with, but perhaps, just maybe this
might help in your decision making.

Good luck,
John
Wow those looks gorgeous and super fun but unfortunately a bit out of my budget 😩😩😩
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Hello,
Perhaps my story may be a 'life raft' in a sea of choices. : )

I road a Trek Carbon 'acoustic' Hybrid and enjoyed it. One day I went to my LBS for some parts, while waiting and looking over the e-bikes
(I'd done that prior). My sales rep "Why don't you take the Trek out for a ride. You're got time." Ok, Why not ? : )

So off I went on the Trek XM700 Commuter. I rode for 20+ minutes and knew in the first 10 minutes this e-Bike was for me ! I could
feel it. Total happiness !

I'd never been on an e-Bike in my life, I'd never 'drowned' in a sea of choices because I'd never looked. I was
happy with my 'acoustic' Trek Hybrid, but after that short ride I know I had to have that XM 700. I returned to my LBS and bought the
bike on the spot.

Best biking decision I've ever made. That was three years and 7000 miles ago. Even today, every ride day is like Christmas morning.

Since your interest is a Mountain bike, I'll share. My original intent was and is to ride flat trails (rails to trails) and slightly gritty. Since my
XM 700 is a commuter, I used it on the rails to trails gravel, but felt somewhat insecure, so...

I bought a Trek Powerfly 7 hardtail e-MTB without ever riding it. I trusted my LBS. What kind of nut does that ! : ) Me. I could not
be happier with the Powerfly Love It !! It will climb a brick wall, is stable and so much fun. Honestly if I were to do it all over again
the Powerfly 7 would be my only e-Bike. It's great on or off the trail for my style of riding....

I'm not suggesting my approach will work for you. We all have to do what we're comfortable with, but perhaps, just maybe this
might help in your decision making.

Good luck,
John
Very similar to my story in that I rode one other ebike, a Trek, two years before I bought my Allant+7 after a single test ride. I have owned and been very happy with several analog Trek bikes. The reason I waited two years before buying was that I felt the market wasn’t mature enough as far as choice, knowledge, parts, commitment to the ebike market. The +7 was a true revelation for me. I took it for an hour long ride through a hilly park and it’s climbing ability and how it rode were key to my decision. The cost was a bit more than I wanted to spend but was worth it, IMO, given the obvious quality and the vast support network in my region.
One more thing...remember that any bike may be hard to find right now. So getting an available ebike is a plus and you also need to ask yourself how long you’re willing to wait for a bike.
 
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Whatdevs

New Member
Region
USA
City
West Sacramento
Just a suggestion, use the search option. Your type of title shows up about 10 times a month.
Haha yeah I actually did that but I wasn’t finding posts with my EXACT wants/size/use/etc. so figured I throw it in the mix ;)
 

linklemming

Well-Known Member
Thanks, Al! That's really help info re: propietary parts. And yeah I've been waffling about the fat tires, I just keep reading mixed reviews so wasn't sure. The Rize actually most of what I really want other than the standover height being a bit high for me (30") and having skinner tires (2.1"). Can't do much about the heigh but could I swap out for a slightly bigger tire if I wanted?
The advice Al gave was excellent advice.

Johns advice on trek is also good and can be applied to many of the bigger brands. I have no direct experience with trek but hear good things on their customer support. Although not so popular on these forums, pedego tries to be really good with customer service...kindof like the apple of ebikes...love it or hate it. Just be aware that you are evaluating the bike shop just as much as the brand. I bought my first ebike soley because it was carried by a shop that I wanted to support. They came thru when my battery died and I got a free replacement (worth $1200) after about a year and 4k miles.

Something to consider is that you might really take a liking to your new toy and may want more out of it. I have spent my whole life pursuing hobbies where I always started cheap and then upgraded over and over which ended up costing more in the long run.

These days, I just go for it at the start (I would rather spend money on something I want then get something I dont want on sale). My first ebike ($3600 Bulls eMTB hardtail) was more than I wanted to spend but I decided to just go for it. I have been a lifelong cyclist but over the years have gotten slower and fatter and riding just wasnt as much fun. Glad I spent the money up front as it totally changed cycling for me and I now ride pretty much everyday and have 4 ebikes. The Bulls is still my overall favorite

I almost bought a cheaper ebike ($1500 prodecotech phantom) a year before the bulls. Sure glad I didnt do that now.
 
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BET

Active Member
I would say reduce your choices to bikes with smaller frames that would fit you. For example while you might fit on an Espin Flow 17 inch frame step thru, I think the Espin Sport and Ride1 up non step thru's will be too big. A lot of people like the Rad bikes. Espin has a 20 inch tire fat step thru model called Nesta - suspension fork, hydraulic brakes, etc. Fat tires will be heavier but for 20 inch wheels they provide more stability. Aventon has various size frames and sells both on line and through stores. You might also check with REI as they have several models and would provide local support. The other decision is hub v. mid drive. Hub motors are generally cheaper and in my opinion are fine. All of our e bikes have hub motors. If you have steep hills in your area that may effect your choice. Some might say mid drives give you more of a work out.
 

Whatdevs

New Member
Region
USA
City
West Sacramento
I would say reduce your choices to bikes with smaller frames that would fit you. For example while you might fit on an Espin Flow 17 inch frame step thru, I think the Espin Sport and Ride1 up non step thru's will be too big. A lot of people like the Rad bikes. Espin has a 20 inch tire fat step thru model called Nesta - suspension fork, hydraulic brakes, etc. Fat tires will be heavier but for 20 inch wheels they provide more stability. Aventon has various size frames and sells both on line and through stores. You might also check with REI as they have several models and would provide local support. The other decision is hub v. mid drive. Hub motors are generally cheaper and in my opinion are fine. All of our e bikes have hub motors. If you have steep hills in your area that may effect your choice. Some might say mid drives give you more of a work out.
Yeah I’m pretty bummed about the size issue. That’s the one thing I can’t really get around or compromise on.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
99% of people on here recommend 20" tire bikes to short people. Fat tire helps a little, but running through a pothole on a 20" wheel is not fun. If you are following cars through a traffic signal or there is water on the road, you can't see every pot hole. I ride a 26"x2.1" tire, on a hard frame that won't require a new suspension fork in 5 years. Its been 3 years since purchase, make that 2 years left on a cheap suspension fork. Look for 16" or 17" frames, not an undersized tire, IMHO.
Plus numerous comments about how hard it is to change a tube on a fat tire. I go places the taxis can't find on roads with no street signs with a name. I can change a tube anywhere, anytime. I don't even have to disconnect wires to the hub motor.
 
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Gordon71

Well-Known Member
The only help I can offer is that I love my Rad Rover ST. So far it's handled the roads and trails with no problem and I've not encountered a hill I couldn't easily pedal up and I'm 72.
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I haven't actually looked into that much because I assumed I wouldn't be able to get repairs done on an ebike at most LBS. I will take a look. I also am in an area that VeloFix services so I figured I could rely on that worst case.
Look at the thread on CODE 30. Getting help for a new bike purchased online without local support can be expensive. You might call Mike's Bikes and see about their trial program and what they have in your size. They have 12 locations in your area. Spending a little more upfront to get a bike that is supported by a local bike shop is well worth it in my view. Mike's Petaluma sends unsupported electric bikes to me because they don't want to deal with them. Most off the online hub-drives are pretty junky. Would you buy a musical instrument without playing it?
 

Whatdevs

New Member
Region
USA
City
West Sacramento
Look at the thread on CODE 30. Getting help for a new bike purchased online without local support can be expensive. You might call Mike's Bikes and see about their trial program and what they have in your size. They have 12 locations in your area. Spending a little more upfront to get a bike that is supported by a local bike shop is well worth it in my view. Mike's Petaluma sends unsupported electric bikes to me because they don't want to deal with them. Most off the online hub-drives are pretty junky. Would you buy a musical instrument without playing it?
I'm not far from Petaluma, can I just bring my bike to you? ;) (only half joking)
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
Most off the online hub-drives are pretty junky. Would you buy a musical instrument without playing it?
That is a rather vague generalization. What are you selling? Any buyer needs to do the research;
& ¨most´of that information is available in EBR reviews.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
99% of people on here recommend 20" tire bikes to short people.
I cannot understand it.
  • The total wheel height for 20 x 4" fat tyre is 759 mm
  • Same for 29 x 2" tyre is 722 mm
  • Same for 27.5 x 2.6" tyre is 714 mm.
Why are e-bikes built on the tallest possible wheels perceived as good for short people?! Is there something I'm missing?
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
Buying an ebike isn´t like going to a car dealership & browsing the inventory. Because of that,
EBR reviews are such an important source of information with detailed specs on every aspect
of a bike. It affords the reader the best chance of finding a bike that best serves their needs &
budget, categorized to help you find the perfect ride. If you go to a bike shop.just remember they
have a vested interest in what they are selling.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Buying an ebike isn´t like going to a car dealership & browsing the inventory. Because of that,
EBR reviews are such an important source of information with detailed specs on every aspect
of a bike. It affords the reader the best chance of finding a bike that best serves their needs &
budget, categorized to help you find the perfect ride. If you go to a bike shop.just remember they
have a vested interest in what they are selling.
True, but some bike shops have a bigger vested interest in happy customers and word of mouth advertising.
 

Whatdevs

New Member
Region
USA
City
West Sacramento
Thanks to all for your input and advice. I just pulled the trigger on the Rad because in the end my height requirement and budget felt really limiting. I wish some of specs were better but I think for this point in time, and especially for my first ebike, the huge community will be a really big asset for having the support I need as a newbie. I can always upgrade down the road! See you on the forum. 😊
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
True, but some bike shops have a bigger vested interest in happy customers and word of mouth advertising.
More power to ´em. Bikes shops around here have gotten pretty mercenary since C-19.
Two shops wanted $18 for single pair of disc brake pads. I got 4 pair online for $12. I did
have to wait 3 more days, having already ordered when I checked the shops. Bear in mind,
I do all my own maintenance & repair. Those without the tools & skills are dependent on shops.
 

linklemming

Well-Known Member
I cannot understand it.
  • The total wheel height for 20 x 4" fat tyre is 759 mm
  • Same for 29 x 2" tyre is 722 mm
  • Same for 27.5 x 2.6" tyre is 714 mm.
Why are e-bikes built on the tallest possible wheels perceived as good for short people?! Is there something I'm missing?
Probably because your 20x4 data looks more 26x4 data.

From https://www.bikecalc.com/wheel_size_math

20x4 recumbent = 654mm
20x4 schwinn = 622mm
20x4 BMX/recum = 609mm

Not sure what 20inch tire is used in this discussion, there is a great article by non other than SB
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html

Perhaps you can provide a better technical reference Stefan?

26x4 = 762mm
29x2 = 723mm
27.5x2.6 = 716mm
 

Marci jo

Well-Known Member
Thanks to all for your input and advice. I just pulled the trigger on the Rad because in the end my height requirement and budget felt really limiting. I wish some of specs were better but I think for this point in time, and especially for my first ebike, the huge community will be a really big asset for having the support I need as a newbie. I can always upgrade down the road! See you on the forum. 😊
Enjoy your new Rad!
Lots of miles and smiles.
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
Thanks to all for your input and advice. I just pulled the trigger on the Rad because in the end my height requirement and budget felt really limiting. I wish some of specs were better but I think for this point in time, and especially for my first ebike, the huge community will be a really big asset for having the support I need as a newbie. I can always upgrade down the road! See you on the forum. 😊
I think you made a pretty good choice. Thatś a good entry level bike that won´t break the bank. Rad
is well established & have a decent support structure should the need arise. Then too, we´re all here for you
if you have questions.