Dual suspension commuter bike

cleo1943

Member
I have an Aventon Level. After adding ergonomic grips and Kinetic seat suspension, this bike is almost perfect for me in terms of aesthetics, range, and comfort. But, my dream bike would be a dual suspension, dual purpose bike; commuter and mountain. Reisse-Muller makes one, but, it is ten grand plus. Now I see on the net, the Frey CC , with good components for 3 grand plus shipping! The bike shops in the area have not heard of Riesse Muller and suggest buying another bike for mountain biking. There is a French company, called Mosquito, that makes such a bike, also expensive, relatively, with no dealers in the Phoenix area. Why is there no American company that produces a dual suspension commuter bike? RM must know something; they have two hundred employees. Of course, it may not be appropriate for severe trails, but sufficient for riders like me.
 

m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I repeatedly had to stop myself from pushing the Checkout button and buying a Frey CC. Its an excellent design... but shipping a Frey is a lot more expensive than a normal bike so figure another $800 onto the cost and be happy if it comes out less.

Frey is simply catering to a niche nobody else has decided to try and fill. A FS bike with a rear rack is what you'd need otherwise and that rack is where the rub is... otherwise you could just buy any emtb and put smooth tires on it.
 

Shaggy

New Member
I have an Aventon Level. After adding ergonomic grips and Kinetic seat suspension, this bike is almost perfect for me in terms of aesthetics, range, and comfort. But, my dream bike would be a dual suspension, dual purpose bike; commuter and mountain. Reisse-Muller makes one, but, it is ten grand plus. Now I see on the net, the Frey CC , with good components for 3 grand plus shipping! The bike shops in the area have not heard of Riesse Muller and suggest buying another bike for mountain biking. There is a French company, called Mosquito, that makes such a bike, also expensive, relatively, with no dealers in the Phoenix area. Why is there no American company that produces a dual suspension commuter bike? RM must know something; they have two hundred employees. Of course, it may not be appropriate for severe trails, but sufficient for riders like me.
Suggest you look into a Trek or Haibike. I know a co-worker in San francisco who commutes 50 miles over the Gold Gate bridge! She is a petite woman of 55 and does this daily. (Too much for me! But shows what's possible!)
Here's the model she bought 2 years ago (Dual Suspension with commuter fenders) and the same trek is better now: https://electricbikereview.com/trek/powerfly-fs-9-equipped/
 

antboy

Well-Known Member
I have an Aventon Level. After adding ergonomic grips and Kinetic seat suspension, this bike is almost perfect for me in terms of aesthetics, range, and comfort. But, my dream bike would be a dual suspension, dual purpose bike; commuter and mountain. Reisse-Muller makes one, but, it is ten grand plus.
How much weight do you think you'd be carrying on the rear rack?

Topeak makes their TetraRacks, including support for FS bikes, rated for 26 pounds. I think some other EBR users have tried them out with some success, and I know Court did a review of them a couple of months back...

 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
There is a French company, called Mosquito
It's Moustache.
Double suspension commuter e-bikes never come free if the suspension is to be any good. That's because good suspension itself costs a small fortune.

There are simpler (and far cheaper) ways to make rides smooth for an existing e-bike:
  • Reducing the tyre pressure towards the minimum allowed by the manufacturer. That simple operation makes miracles.
  • Using a suspension seatpost. Cirrus Cycles Kinekt 2.1, RedShift ShockStop, Cane Creek Thudbuster, and even Suntour makes not bad seatposts like that.
  • Using suspension stem or suspension handlebars.
These three actions convert a regular no suspension e-bike in something really comfy. I know. I'm riding one. And I also own a full-suspension e-MTB. In urban environment, full-suspension is rarely necessary and is a matter of choice for loaded people desiring a SUV e-bike.
 

Ken M

Well-Known Member
It's Moustache.
Double suspension commuter e-bikes never come free if the suspension is to be any good. That's because good suspension itself costs a small fortune.

There are simpler (and far cheaper) ways to make rides smooth for an existing e-bike:
  • Reducing the tyre pressure towards the minimum allowed by the manufacturer. That simple operation makes miracles.
  • Using a suspension seatpost. Cirrus Cycles Kinekt 2.1, RedShift ShockStop, Cane Creek Thudbuster, and even Suntour makes not bad seatposts like that.
  • Using suspension stem or suspension handlebars.
These three actions convert a regular no suspension e-bike in something really comfy. I know. I'm riding one. And I also own a full-suspension e-MTB. In urban environment, full-suspension is rarely necessary and is a matter of choice for loaded people desiring a SUV e-bike.
I 100% agree with this but have some additional input as to why this is sound logic. The main reason for a suspension on a mtn bike is to keep the wheels in contact with the trail for maximum traction and handling - the primary reason is not comfort. On an urban ebike the merits of full suspension for contact road contact is pretty much negligible so any suspension (from tires, seat post, stem, etc.) is pretty much all about comfort and they provide just as much comfort as full conventional suspension. The cost is a lot less, the service maintenance is a lot less, etc. so don't expect the bike companies to be forthright in their marketing of full suspension on urban ebikes as they want everyone to believe that full suspension is a must have on the road. Kookaid comes in many flavors from those in marketing.
 

mjeds

Active Member
Region
USA
Cyrusher XF800.

been commuting on this full suspension bike for 8 months, 6,000 miles.

comes with a cheap rear shock, need to upgrade to a good air shock, I added road tires because the off-road tires were a bit harsh, beyond that it is has been a great commuter.

 

ElevenAD

Well-Known Member
Cyrusher XF800.

been commuting on this full suspension bike for 8 months, 6,000 miles.

comes with a cheap rear shock, need to upgrade to a good air shock, I added road tires because the off-road tires were a bit harsh, beyond that it is has been a great commuter.

waaat! wow 6,000 miles in one year is impressive! thats some serious commuting! very inspiring,its also good to hear your Cyrusher held up! i have seen them on the road once or twice!
 

ElevenAD

Well-Known Member
there is also the SuperMonarchs 1500 watt Crown the 1000 and the 750 watt! i am not really a fan of the price($4500) or looks but i have yet to see one bad review of either model and given the set up and components one thing is for sure, it is one hell of a commuter bike!
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mjeds

Active Member
Region
USA
waaat! wow 6,000 miles in one year is impressive! thats some serious commuting! very inspiring,its also good to hear your Cyrusher held up! i have seen them on the road once or twice!
No 6,000 miles in just under 8 months. I will hit 10,000 by the end of my 1 year of ownership of the bike.