E-bikes in Denali National Park

rezonatefreq

New Member
Thought some might be interested in e-biking in Denali National Park in Alaska.

The National Park Service issued the e-bike directive at the end of August 2019 allowing ebikes in Denali National Park on the roads. With 92 miles of road it would be quite an adventure to do the entire Denali park road. We did about 50 miles one way and 100 round trip across three days. The dramatic elevation changes of the road make it a great fit for e-bikes and non athletic riders. Its also a lot of fun going downhill for miles.

denali road elevations.png


Information can be found here:
https://www.nps.gov/dena/planyourvisit/cycling.htm

Also attached is the policy memo from the Deputy Director of US Dept of Interior NPS.

excerpt:
Electronic Bikes (E-Bikes)
The term “e-bike” means a two- or three-wheeled cycle with fully operable pedals and an electric motor of less than 750 watts (1 horsepower).

E-bikes are allowed in Denali, in accordance with the provisions of 36 CFR Part 4. Specifically, e-bikes are allowed on park roads (e.g., the Denali Park Road and roads within campgrounds), parking areas, and trails (e.g., the Denali Bike Path) that are open to traditional bicycles.

E-bikes are prohibited where traditional bicycles are prohibited under 36 CFR 4.30. Notably, that section articulates that the following are prohibited:
  • Operating a bicycle during periods of low visibility or between sunrise and sunset, without a white light or reflector on the front, and a red light or reflector on the back, of the bike.
  • Operating a bicycle abreast of another bicycle (i.e., you should ride single-file).
Except where use of motor vehicles by the public is allowed, using the electric motor to move an e-bike without pedaling is prohibited. Functionally, this means that you cannot use an e-bike's motor in an area that is open to traditional bikes, but closed to motor vehicles.

A person operating an e-bike is subject to the same sections of 36 CFR part 4 that apply to the use of traditional bicycles concerning general cycling rules. These general cycling rules are articulated below, in the "Rules of the Road" section.

Except as specified in the Denali Superintendent's Compendium, the use of an e-bike within Denali National Park and Preserve is governed by State law, which is adopted and made a part of said Compendium. Any violation of State law adopted by this paragraph is prohibited.


excerpt from 2020 Compendium:
The NPS added language addressing the use of electric bicycles (e-bikes) in National Park System units in Alaska. On August 30, 2019, the National Park Service published an e-bike policy. A stated goal of the policy is to address e-bikes so that the NPS can exercise clear management authority over them within the National Park System. The policy provides that e-bikes are to be allowed in areas where traditional bicycles are allowed. Under national NPS regulations, traditional bicycles are allowed only on roads, parking areas, and designated trails. 36 CFR 4.30(h). Under Federal law specific to conservation system units in Alaska, which include national parks, “nonmotorized surface transportation methods for traditional activities … and for travel to and from villages and homesites” are allowed notwithstanding any other provision of law. 16 USC 3170(a). It has been the position of the Department of the Interior that these methods include the use of traditional bicycles. E-bikes do not fall under this allowance because they have an electric motor and therefore are not “nonmotorized.” Although ANILCA allows traditional bicycles anywhere within conservation system units in Alaska, NPS Region 11 (Alaska) allows e-bikes only on roads, parking areas, and designated trails where traditional bicycles are allowed. This ensures that the NPS manages e-bikes in Alaska in the same way it manages ebikes outside of Alaska. The nationwide policy intended to achieve a consistent management framework for e-bikes within the National Park System. In addition, the NPS has no data on the level of bicycle use on more than 20 million acres in Alaska that are off-trail and not in designated wilderness. This would make it very difficult to anticipate the impacts of allowing e-bikes in those same, vast locations – impacts that could include concerns about public safety associated with remote, cross-country travel, protection of resources in sensitive biomes such as tundra, and management objectives such as preserving wilderness character in eligible wilderness.
 

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reed scott

Well-Known Member
Thought some might be interested in e-biking in Denali National Park in Alaska.

The National Park Service issued the e-bike directive at the end of August 2019 allowing ebikes in Denali National Park on the roads. With 92 miles of road it would be quite an adventure to do the entire Denali park road. We did about 50 miles one way and 100 round trip across three days. The dramatic elevation changes of the road make it a great fit for e-bikes and non athletic riders. Its also a lot of fun going downhill for miles.

View attachment 62937

Information can be found here:
https://www.nps.gov/dena/planyourvisit/cycling.htm

Also attached is the policy memo from the Deputy Director of US Dept of Interior NPS.

excerpt:
Electronic Bikes (E-Bikes)
The term “e-bike” means a two- or three-wheeled cycle with fully operable pedals and an electric motor of less than 750 watts (1 horsepower).

E-bikes are allowed in Denali, in accordance with the provisions of 36 CFR Part 4. Specifically, e-bikes are allowed on park roads (e.g., the Denali Park Road and roads within campgrounds), parking areas, and trails (e.g., the Denali Bike Path) that are open to traditional bicycles.

E-bikes are prohibited where traditional bicycles are prohibited under 36 CFR 4.30. Notably, that section articulates that the following are prohibited:
  • Operating a bicycle during periods of low visibility or between sunrise and sunset, without a white light or reflector on the front, and a red light or reflector on the back, of the bike.
  • Operating a bicycle abreast of another bicycle (i.e., you should ride single-file).
Except where use of motor vehicles by the public is allowed, using the electric motor to move an e-bike without pedaling is prohibited. Functionally, this means that you cannot use an e-bike's motor in an area that is open to traditional bikes, but closed to motor vehicles.

A person operating an e-bike is subject to the same sections of 36 CFR part 4 that apply to the use of traditional bicycles concerning general cycling rules. These general cycling rules are articulated below, in the "Rules of the Road" section.

Except as specified in the Denali Superintendent's Compendium, the use of an e-bike within Denali National Park and Preserve is governed by State law, which is adopted and made a part of said Compendium. Any violation of State law adopted by this paragraph is prohibited.


excerpt from 2020 Compendium:
The NPS added language addressing the use of electric bicycles (e-bikes) in National Park System units in Alaska. On August 30, 2019, the National Park Service published an e-bike policy. A stated goal of the policy is to address e-bikes so that the NPS can exercise clear management authority over them within the National Park System. The policy provides that e-bikes are to be allowed in areas where traditional bicycles are allowed. Under national NPS regulations, traditional bicycles are allowed only on roads, parking areas, and designated trails. 36 CFR 4.30(h). Under Federal law specific to conservation system units in Alaska, which include national parks, “nonmotorized surface transportation methods for traditional activities … and for travel to and from villages and homesites” are allowed notwithstanding any other provision of law. 16 USC 3170(a). It has been the position of the Department of the Interior that these methods include the use of traditional bicycles. E-bikes do not fall under this allowance because they have an electric motor and therefore are not “nonmotorized.” Although ANILCA allows traditional bicycles anywhere within conservation system units in Alaska, NPS Region 11 (Alaska) allows e-bikes only on roads, parking areas, and designated trails where traditional bicycles are allowed. This ensures that the NPS manages e-bikes in Alaska in the same way it manages ebikes outside of Alaska. The nationwide policy intended to achieve a consistent management framework for e-bikes within the National Park System. In addition, the NPS has no data on the level of bicycle use on more than 20 million acres in Alaska that are off-trail and not in designated wilderness. This would make it very difficult to anticipate the impacts of allowing e-bikes in those same, vast locations – impacts that could include concerns about public safety associated with remote, cross-country travel, protection of resources in sensitive biomes such as tundra, and management objectives such as preserving wilderness character in eligible wilderness.
Would it be a violation to use your throttle and high sport mode if a grizzly is chasing you? I hear they can do 35mph for a few hundred yards. :)
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
A Demented Corner of the North Cascades
Would it be a violation to use your throttle and high sport mode if a grizzly is chasing you? I hear they can do 35mph for a few hundred yards. :)
I doubt very many street legal e-bikes can go that fast over the lumpy mattress tundra that surrounds the park road, regardless of power.