E- road bike for longer weekend rides

Mamabernst

New Member
I have a 2018 specialized Vado 6.0 for my daily commute. I’m contemplating swapping my carbon fiber weekend bike for an e-road bike. The Vado 6 is heavy with an upright configuration. Looking for input if there’s a lightish-weight, drop handlebar, good range (60-75miles) road bike to give me a boost when I join my bike group that likes to average 17mph on rides. Thanks
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I have a 2018 specialized Vado 6.0 for my daily commute. I’m contemplating swapping my carbon fiber weekend bike for an e-road bike. The Vado 6 is heavy with an upright configuration. Looking for input if there’s a lightish-weight, drop handlebar, good range (60-75miles) road bike to give me a boost when I join my bike group that likes to average 17mph on rides. Thanks
The Cannondale Topstone Neo 2 is a carbon fiber frame gravel bike with a Shimano GRX group set with a 2x13 22 speed drive train. It has the Bosch speed motor that assists up to 28 mph and a 500 watt hour battery. II have the Neo 3 version with a lefty front fork and a 1x11 drive train. At 190 lbs I get close to 100 miles in Eco assist mode, around 65 miles in Sport mode. The bike weighs 37 lbs.

Although it is a designed gravel bike, these bike have impeccable road manners. They are hard to find but there are some dealers that have a few in stock. Also they come up late model used on the Pros Closet web site.

There are other road style ebikes but most of them have lower spec motors, smaller batteries, and quit helping at 20 mph

 
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tomjasz

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Minnesnowta
Too funny. We tend to claim our choice is the best choice. It's almost a disease here on EBR.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Too funny. We tend to claim our choice is the best choice. It's almost a disease here on EBR.
If, after reading the use case of the person seeking advice, it points toward a bike we know, really enjoy and have had sustained positive experience with, suggesting that bike only makes sense.

I have owned several bikes made by one of the top ebike makers but my experience with them is such that I am not comfortable recommending them, especially when configured with poorly supported components.

I am not asking for confirmation of my own conclusions, just passing them along as I judge it as a good option of the OP's stated desires.

I do not claim the Topstone Neo Carbon 2 is THE answer. It is only my answer...FWIW
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
First of all, the OP asked for a road e-bike. Topstone is a gravel e-bike and that makes a difference for a roadie. Although the Topstone is pretty lightweight as for an e-bike, Specialized Creo SL is even more lightweight. The Specialized SL system is unique in the sense it is not only lightweight but it also ensures a long range provided the cyclist is ready to get some workout. I could say a lot about totally natural riding experience of the SL e-bikes that feel traditional e-bikes but add some steroids to the ride, which is vital upwind and uphill. An SL e-bike can be easily ridden without any assistance.

Regarding the range, it can be easily enhanced by adding a Range Extender, a 1 kg (2.2 lb) water-bottle-battery. And, Specialized Turbo Creo SL is at the latest version of the Specialized system, while the Topstone is still using the older Bosch E-Bike system (not the Smart System). The Specialized system ensures full connectivity with sports devices, and it is fully tuneable (so the rider can easily manipulate assistance levels for either long distance or fast riding).

The OP is already a Specialized e-bike rider. This is my explanation for my curt "Specialized Creo is the answer".


1658465430420.png

The aluminium version of Creo SL I demo-rode.

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The real disease of this Forum are some people like Tom who have never ridden a premium e-bike but form opinions (you Alaskan are a different person). I took my time and spent money to give a Creo a long demo ride on a very cold Autumn Saturday. I decided that e-bike was not for me just because I could not really ride with drop bars. Otherwise, it is an excellent road e-bike. Besides, my big Specialized e-bike is a Euro equivalent of the OP's Vado 6.0, and I also ride Specialized Vado SL.

There is a big community of Creo riders in these forums, and I am sure they would like to share their experience.
 
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rayray

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Another vote for the Creo. I’m loving mine.

It’s super light for an ebike (claimed weight of 26.8 pounds), the Future Shock 2.0 works great, and the carbon seat post that came on mine has a noticeable amount of compliance, but not too much.

I have a Range Extender, so I don’t worry about range at all. My longest ride thus far was 49 miles at average speed of 13.8 mph. As I was slowing for pedestrians and road crossings, I actually rode much of it at 18-20 mph, and sometimes faster, and I still had 43% of battery remaining at the end of the ride.

It also came with the SRAM AXS derailleur, which shifts via Bluetooth communication (not every Creo model has this though), and it shifts absolutely precisely every time.

Yep, loving it!

E2A04988-1C24-4712-B6E8-02373F4D24DE.jpeg
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
The Turbo Creo is a great bike. It is also a designed gravel bike. Specialized offers a lighter weight version with a more road oriented group set, larger front chainring and skinnier tires, same frame with same head tube angle. In all cases Turbo Creo is only available in a 1x configuration 11 or 12 speed, there are no models with a dual front chain ring and front derailleur. Lots of people are buying e-gravel bikes and using them principally on roads. The Turbo Creo SL Evo is one of these as is the Cannondale Topstone Neo Carbon 2 with its rigid fork and 2x11, 22 speed drive train.

There are certainly trade off between the two bikes. The Topstone weighs six to eight pounds more but its motor puts out 85 Newton Meters of torque, as opposed to 35 Newton Meters on the Creo. The Topstone Neo battery is 500 watt hours, the Turbo Creo is 320 watt hours (Specialized offers a 120 watt hour range extender that adds 2.5 pounds). If you want lighter weight with less than half the motor power and 38 % smaller battery, then the Creo is your bike. I think the range of both bikes is comparable as the Creo with its lower assist, will use less power per mile.
 

PSm

Active Member
Region
USA
First of all, the OP asked for a road e-bike. Topstone is a gravel e-bike and that makes a difference for a roadie. Although the Topstone is pretty lightweight as for an e-bike, Specialized Creo SL is even more lightweight. The Specialized SL system is unique in the sense it is not only lightweight but it also ensures a long range provided the cyclist is ready to get some workout. I could say a lot about totally natural riding experience of the SL e-bikes that feel traditional e-bikes but add some steroids to the ride, which is vital upwind and uphill. An SL e-bike can be easily ridden without any assistance.

Regarding the range, it can be easily enhanced by adding a Range Extender, a 1 kg (2.2 lb) water-bottle-battery. And, Specialized Turbo Creo SL is at the latest version of the Specialized system, while the Topstone is still using the older Bosch E-Bike system (not the Smart System). The Specialized system ensures full connectivity with sports devices, and it is fully tuneable (so the rider can easily manipulate assistance levels for either long distance or fast riding).

The OP is already a Specialized e-bike rider. This is my explanation for my curt "Specialized Creo is the answer".


View attachment 129761
The aluminium version of Creo SL I demo-rode.

View attachment 129762

The real disease of this Forum are some people like Tom who have never ridden a premium e-bike but form opinions (you Alaskan are a different person). I took my time and spent money to give a Creo a long demo ride on a very cold Autumn Saturday. I decided that e-bike was not for me just because I could not really ride with drop bars. Otherwise, it is an excellent road e-bike. Besides, my big Specialized e-bike is a Euro equivalent of the OP's Vado 6.0, and I also ride Specialized Vado SL.

There is a big community of Creo riders in these forums, and I am sure they would like to share their experience.
Since the OP already rides Specialized, and needs the range, if cost is not prohibitive then the Turbo Creo SL seems like a great option. Brand familiarity is often a good thing. My friend that has one LOVES it, and his analog bike riding buddies "hate" him 😀. And his wife says before he got it he came home from long rides just thrashed, but now comes home more normal looking 😉

Whatever choice is made, getting a bike with an extender battery option seems like a wise decision. Gives you much more flexibility, especially if you even do some really fast-paced rides. For me at least, with my preferred single speed belt drive flat bar Ride1UP Roadster ebike, the extender battery allowed me to go from 30-60 mile rides with the internal battery, to 60-90 mile rides (if hypermiling and pushing myself to the limit) with both internal & external battery. I am able to keep up on the fast, roadie group rides going 17-18 mph with burst speeds much higher than that, but it drops my range down significantly, to maybe 35-45 miles with a bit of climbing.

I imagine that the Creo could have similar range reduction if averaging 17+ mph speeds, and bursts on the flats up to 20-25+ mph, and aggressive acceleration and out of the saddle climbing up major grades, but I can't speak from personal experience with that bike (only mine).

Good luck!
 
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Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
Specialized offers a 120 watt hour range extender that adds 2.5 pounds).
Precisely 160 Wh at 2.2 lbs. It makes 480 Wh altogether. The number of Range Extenders is technically unlimited. I happened to carry three REs (one on bike) and two in a backpack on a demanding gravel group ride with my Vado SL.

Less han half of the maximum power of a big motor means less than half of battery energy consumption at the cost of less torque and with higher rider's contribution to the ride.

Just to leave no doubts.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Precisely 160 Wh at 2.2 lbs. It makes 480 Wh altogether. The number of Range Extenders is technically unlimited. I happened to carry three REs (one on bike) and two in a backpack on a demanding gravel group ride with my Vado SL.

Less than half of the maximum power of a big motor means less than half of battery energy consumption at the cost of less torque and with higher rider's contribution to the ride.

Just to leave no doubts
Actually, to be perfectly precise, the official stated weight of the Specialized Range Extender is 1067 grams which is 2.35 lbs.

In the USA they are priced at $450, quite high for only 120 Watt Hours (a 500 watt hour Bosch Power Tube can be purchased for $650).

In point of fact "less than half of the maximum power" means is not an option to have more power for hills and headwinds .

You can always use less assist and more muscle power on a bike with a more powerful motor to achieve greater range (I get close to 120 miles in Eco). However you cannot get more help out of a 35 newton meter motor than 35 newton meters.

I test rode the Creo and it was not adequate for getting me up an 18% grade, climbing the hill up to our house. I had to walk and push the bike up two blocks of 18% grade.
 
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Saratoga Dave

Well-Known Member
If I moved to the top of an 18% hill, it had better have a chairlift on it!

If, however, you live somewhere a bit less exciting, it’s hard to beat a Creo if you want a road ebike experience that’s as close as possible to a straight up road bike.

Still, Richard as usual makes a good point, and you could also add the Giant Road E and the 2021 Trek Domane HP (if you can find one someplace) to the pile as really good, full power e road bikes If you want to flatten the big hills as much as possible.

I think if you already have and are comfortable on a carbon road bike, you need to go find a bike shop or someone with a Creo you can try, and do so. It would probably be the end of the discussion.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
the official stated weight of the Specialized Range Extender is 1067 grams which is 2.35 lbs.
I weighed it. 1067 g is with the cable.

In the USA they are priced at $450, quite high for only 120 Watt Hours (a 500 watt hour Bosch Power Tube can be purchased for $650).
But you cannot add the second 500 Wh battery to your Topstone.

160 Wh.

If I moved to the top of an 18% hill, it had better have a chairlift on it!
The OP already has a Vado 6.0 :) I made 19% on mine, with MTB chainring.
 
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rayray

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Actually, to be perfectly precise, the official stated weight of the Specialized Range Extender is 1067 grams which is 2.35 lbs.

In the USA they are priced at $450, quite high for only 120 Watt Hours (a 500 watt hour Bosch Power Tube can be purchased for $650).
In point of fact "less than half of the maximum power" means is not an option to have more power for hills and headwinds .
You can always use less assist and more muscle power on a bike with a more powerful motor to achieve greater range (I get close to 120 miles in Eco). However you cannot get more help out of a 35 newton meter motor than 35 newton meters. I test rode the Creo and it was not adequate for getting me up an 18% grade, climbing the hill up to our house. I had to walk and push the bike up two blocks of 18% grade.

Yeah, I don’t know if I’d make it up an 18% grade on my Creo, but I wouldn’t want to try it on my Trek 9.9S either. That’s one heck of a hill!
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
If I moved to the top of an 18% hill, it had better have a chairlift on it!

If, however, you live somewhere a bit less exciting, it’s hard to beat a Creo if you want a road ebike experience that’s as close as possible to a straight up road bike.

Still, Richard as usual makes a good point, and you could also add the Giant Road E and the 2021 Trek Domane HP (if you can find one someplace) to the pile as really good, full power e road bikes If you want to flatten the big hills as much as possible.

I think if you already have and are comfortable on a carbon road bike, you need to go find a bike shop or someone with a Creo you can try, and do so. It would probably be the end of the discussion.
Correct me if I am wrong but isn't the Trek Domane + LT, with the Fazua motor, a purpose designed road bike, not a gravel bike? With the motor and battery removable, leaving a 26 lb. bike, it gives the rider the freedom to choose between ebike or road bike for each ride. It has front and rear Isospeed for greater rider comfort. It also offers the 2 x 11, 22-speed drive train option. It is a lower power version than the with the Domane+ HP which has the same motor and battery as the Cannondale and weighs 7 lbs. more than the Domane+ LT.

DomanePlusLTUS_20_30915_C_Primary
 
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Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I weighed it. 1067 g is with the cable.


But you cannot add the second 500 Wh battery to your Topstone.


160 Wh.


The OP already has a Vado 6.0 :) I made 19% on mine, with MTB chainring.
Not a road bike chain ring which would naturally have more teeth to attain higher speed, sacrificing climbing ability.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Yeah, I don’t know if I’d make it up an 18% grade on my Creo, but I wouldn’t want to try it on my Trek 9.9S either. That’s one heck of a hill!
I have an Allant 9.9s with a 10 x 51 tooth cassette and a 46 tooth front chainring that makes it up that grade just fine in sport (not Turbo) using the 45 tooth (not the biggest) rear cog.
 
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Alaskan

Well-Known Member
But you cannot add the second 500 Wh battery to your Topstone.
I get around 120 miles in Eco, 80 miles in Tour and 65 miles in Sport so I hardly ever need a second battery. I do have one but it is not integrated with the system. When going on a very long ride or overenight, I carry a second 500 watt hour power tube in a frame bag that hangs below the top tube. It takes about a minute to swap out batteries.

20210327_122253.jpg
 

PSm

Active Member
Region
USA
I weighed it. 1067 g is with the cable.


But you cannot add the second 500 Wh battery to your Topstone.


160 Wh.


The OP already has a Vado 6.0 :) I made 19% on mine, with MTB chainring.
19% ! H@ly 💩

Totally different situation for me, but I'm max'd out at 15% for small sections and max effort with my single 64x20 gear 😉
Roadster-v2-red-side.jpg
 

rayray

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I have an Allant 9.9s with a 10 x 51 tooth cassette and a 46 tooth front chainring that makes it up that grade just fine in sport (not Turbo) using the 45 tooth (not the biggest) rear cog.
Now I have to find a suitable hill, so I can take on the challenge (I’m not much of an athlete, but I have a competitive nature). I do know it’d require Turbo for me to get up that kind of grade, even with the Bosch motor, but that may be a personal problem. 😊