Earbuds and wind noise

bjorsa

New Member
Region
Europe
Hi all,
I've been on a tiresome hunt for earbuds or headphones that helps with wind noise. Wind noise is what it is all about. I've read tons of reviews and they all suck badly, not even paying attention to wind, mostly repeating the facts on the box and never actually trying them on the road. I also risked buying some products and they all failed miserably: I can't hear a word unless going up a hill or something.

Meant for podcats, not music. For cycling to work, not on trail and sometimes at high speeds.

Please don't preach about safety, because at 45 kmph I can't hear anything but wind anyways so any reduction of wind noise is a safety bonus. Also a safety bonus not becoming deaf from excessive noise? I wear a rear mirror on my glasses, now that's a safety boost.

I realise Cat-Ears / Wind-blox stuff can help and I sometimes use a home-made equivalent but they're all a bit messy, warm and make me look Steve Urkel level dorky with the rear mirror, funny gear on my handle bar and then weird-ass ear thingies on top of all that. Not recommended if you're single and looking for opportunities on that front. Of course, if you know of a good combo, please, I'm all ears!

Any recommendations would be very, very appreciated!
 

bjorsa

New Member
Region
Europe
Oh, I forgot, but my ear canals react poorly to any earphones designed with a tip sticking in. Not to mention those in-ear earphones quickly turn disgusting from ear wax, or is it just my orch ancestry?
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Regarding wind noise and microphones, especially those mikes used with head sets, they make what they call a wind muff, which is basically a foam cover for the mike. It will cancel ALL wind noise yet still be sensitive to your voice.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
There is a very effective, low tech solution that helps reduce wind noise called Cat Ears by Air Streamz. It is a fuzzy strip of faux fur that velcros onto the forward down strap of a helmet in front of the ears and dramatically reduces wind noise without covering the ears at all. I have had them on all my helmets for several years and find the very effective.

Their web site is quite informative and explains how they work, how they have been scientifically tested with good graphics and videos.
Bottom line is that they work with wind noise reduced by my estimate as much as 50% Get the classic faux fur version as they are the most effective.

One hint is to keep the chin strap comfortably snug such that the wind cannot get between the Cat Ears and your cheek.


ronew.png


Use these in conjunction with bone conducting head set or Terrano XT external helmet communication set up to maintain good auditory situational awareness. I love my Terrano XTs for their sound quality and range allowing my wife and I to communicate comfortably during a ride.
 
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6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
+1 on the Cat-Ears.

I use them with my Sena helmet for it's music, cell phone & intercom features and they are very effective for reducing wind noise.

At my age, I've ceased to care if I look like a dork or not. I'll take function over form any day.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
+1 on the Cat-Ears.

I use them with my Sena helmet for it's music, cell phone & intercom features and they are very effective for reducing wind noise.

At my age, I've ceased to care if I look like a dork or not. I'll take function over form any day.
You don't look like a dork with them on your helmet straps, more like a guy with '70s sideburns ;);)
 

chunk

Well-Known Member
Region
USA

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
If the goal is to block wind noise, these work great. I use them for riding my motorcycle under my helmet. Cheap, reusable for awhile, then toss for a new pair. Very comfortable and will fit most all ear canals. I can still hear with them in, but they block the damaging noise. I've been using them for years.
They also block all other noises, including the sound of oncoming cars.

I am convinced that anything that reduces your ability to hear what might be coming at you on the road, presents an unacceptable increase in risk and danger. I wish you luck with those foam ear plugs...you may well need it.
 

chunk

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Not true in my experience. Under my helmet I still hear plenty good, they just block out the persistent whine of the wind noise that will damage a persons hearing. At petrol stops I can carry on a conversation with ear plugs in and my helmet on. After 40 plus years on motorcycles I would have incurred significant hearing loss without them. One test is worth "1000 expert" opinions and I still hear like a youngster.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Not true in my experience. Under my helmet I still hear plenty good, they just block out the persistent whine of the wind noise that will damage a persons hearing. At petrol stops I can carry on a conversation with ear plugs in and my helmet on. After 40 plus years on motorcycles I would have incurred significant hearing loss without them. One test is worth "1000 expert" opinions and I still hear like a youngster.
The use of the word "block" was a poor choice on my part. Reduce is a more accurate choice.

There is no question the anything that is designed to reduce outside noise whether mechanically or electronically will shorten the distance within which one becomes aware, through sound, that a car or truck is approaching, particularly from behind.
 

WattsUpDude

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
San Francisco, Bay Area
There is a very effective, low tech solution that helps reduce wind noise called Cat Ears by Air Streamz. It is a fuzzy strip of faux fur that velcros onto the forward down strap of a helmet in front of the ears and dramatically reduces wind noise without covering the ears at all. I have had them on all my helmets for several years and find the very effective.

Their web site is quite informative and explains how they work, how they have been scientifically tested with good graphics and videos.
Bottom line is that they work with wind noise reduced by my estimate as much as 50% Get the classic faux fur version as they are the most effective.

One hint is to keep the chin strap comfortably snug such that the wind cannot get between the Cat Ears and your cheek.


ronew.png


Use these in conjunction with bone conducting head set or Terrano XT external helmet communication set up to maintain good auditory situational awareness. I love my Terrano XTs for their sound quality and range allowing my wife and I to communicate comfortably during a ride.

I'm just going to grow my sideburns out.

81xXd6fgtYL._AC_UX679_.jpg
 

bjorsa

New Member
Region
Europe
While I appreciate all your input, I would like to remind everybody Cat Ears were already mentioned in my OP. Also please note that earplugs isn't compatible with listening to podcasts.

(Back when I owned a motorcycle I always used earplugs and simply blasted the in-helmet speakers to compensate. Can't see that happening on my commuter bicycle.)

When I searched the web for soluitons I came across several posts with a similar sentiment. Surely, with such a saturated phletora of different earbuds, there's a market for a model designed to cope with wind turbulence. I'm thinking for downhill skiing, sailing, parachuting... anything windy really. Guess I'm so used to the market pampering my every need it now feels strange to even find a gap.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
While I appreciate all your input, I would like to remind everybody Cat Ears were already mentioned in my OP. Also please note that earplugs isn't compatible with listening to podcasts.
I knew you mentioned the cat ears. I was just offering real user experience. Aside from those, I know of nothing the does not either intrude into your ear canal (sound muting ear buds) or thoroughly cover them (really dorky and goofy looking).

I guess I care less about my appearance...probably because I married the most beautiful woman I ever met 38 years ago and she hasn't kicked me out yet.
 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Minnesnowta
There is a very effective, low tech solution that helps reduce wind noise called Cat Ears by Air Streamz.
INDEED!!! Got mine two weeks ago. My new Phonak Paradise rechargeable hearing aids quieted down incredibly! Amazingly simple. My audiologist had never heard of them.
 

bjorsa

New Member
Region
Europe
Tomjasz, how's this for a quote "I realise Cat-Ears / Wind-blox stuff can help"? You even bothered to post a monkey pic. Probably took you longer than it would to simply read the OP.

To all others, thanks for your help. I often ride without my helmet, so was hoping for something not requiring helmet straps.
 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Minnesnowta
Tomjasz, how's this for a quote "I realise Cat-Ears / Wind-blox stuff can help"? You even bothered to post a monkey pic. Probably took you longer than it would to simply read the OP.

To all others, thanks for your help. I often ride without my helmet, so was hoping for something not requiring helmet straps.
Lighten up. Jeez. We’re not getting out alive. Life’s to short to not laugh…
 

WilliamT

Active Member
in colder temperatures, I switch to a ski helmet which covers your ear entirely and it very comfortable. Some look like cycling helmets (lones by Smith) with the exception of the padding. Many have vents that you can open in warmer temperatures.
 
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