Easy Motion Evo Street (2015) vs CurrieTech izip E3 Path+ (2015)?

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
I think my decision is heading towards one of these 2 eBikes.

1. I need a step-through design.
2. I'm short: 5'0" with an inseam of about 26.5"
3. I need a less aggressive riding position, due to back issues and age. My current Specialized Hybrid bike is causing some neck and back issues. For that reason I thought about and then backed away from the Evo Jet since it is a hybrid design and I already know the riding position will cause my back some issues. Ditto the Dash as well as not being a step through.

The Evo Street is more expensive ($3000 vs $2300), but it has an integrated (downtube) battery. The Evo Street has a 36v Battery. The iZip E3 Path+ has a 48v battery, but the battery is on the back rack. I already know folks on this forum dislike back-heavy designs due to center of gravity concerns.

My local eBike store (and there's only one) happens to carry the Currie line, but not the Easy Motion line. Getting a Currie bike serviced is probably going to be much easier. The closest Easy Motion dealer is 3 to 4 hours away.

I've already watched Court's reviews as well as read about the bikes.

Looking for thoughts and suggestions from the community if one is much better than the other.

thanks all!
 

Chris Nolte

Well-Known Member
Just make sure you test the size on the Path Plus if you're interested in that bike. It's most likely too big for you, although I know the Street will fit. It has smaller wheels and a smaller frame size. It would fit you well. My vote is with the Street for you.
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
That's my one concern with the Path+. What is the minimum height needed to fit this bike?

Why Currie doesn't make this model in a smaller size to accommodate people as short as 4'11" is strange to me. They intend this to be a model that will appeal to a wide variety of people.
 

Chris Nolte

Well-Known Member
That's my one concern with the Path+. What is the minimum height needed to fit this bike?

Why Currie doesn't make this model in a smaller size to accommodate people as short as 4'11" is strange to me. They intend this to be a model that will appeal to a wide variety of people.
It's more a case of standard parts. I'm sure they would like to make it so it would fit shorter riders and they actually did that with there newest release of the 2015 version. Still it becomes difficult with the rear rack battery and 700c wheels. One of the main reasons the Street fits shorter riders is the wheel size, they are 26" instead of the 28" (700c) on the City. This is a common issue we often note when providing feedback to manufacturers, riders under 5'6" are not uncommon although most bikes simply don't accommodate riders of that height. Pedego recognized this and has been offering several smaller sized bikes, they started with offering 24" wheels on there cruiser, then added the 24" Interceptor and now offer the City Commuter with 26" wheels.

As the market grows it becomes easier for brands to offer multiple frame sizes. You see this now with Haibike and Felt offering 4-5 sizes on most of there models. It makes inventory management a bit difficult for retailer, but ultimately it's much better for the rider. I feel much better when I know the bike fits the rider right, ultimately it means you will get much more enjoyment out of the bike.

I hope this helps.
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
Thank you Chris, I really appreciate your comments and info!

My current 2014 Specialized bike (an x-small Vita Hybrid) has 700c tires though the frame is short in the XS size and fits me there. But then the top tube was too short so I had to have a different stem installed to increase that measurement. And now I have neck/back pain from the riding position (never ending bike drama), plus I'm so weak I can only manage to ride 5 to 7 miles on flat paths.

One of my concerns is where I will get an eBike serviced. I need to arrange local support as I am not mechanically inclined. My worry is that any ebike I have to order from elsewhere will then become a burden. The closest dealer who sells & supports Easy Motion is in Virginia Beach, which is about 250 mi from me. The one local eBike-specific shop sells Currie, Prodeco Tech, and I'm not sure what others, but they are not listed in Easy Motion's dealer list.
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
Looks like Pedego City Commuter has a step-thru 26" wheel model. Would this be a viable size for me? I may need to consider this model as well.
 

Chris Nolte

Well-Known Member
Regarding your current bike I would recommend adding an angled or adjustable stem and perhaps a steer tube extender to give you more of an upright seating position. Keep in mind if you do that you will probably need a different saddle to provide more support and possibly some suspension as all your weight will be moved backwards.

Regarding ebike service, most ebikes are modular so most repairs consist of swapping a part rather than really digging into the electronics as most people think. At least the good ones work in that way and frankly that's all we sell, partly for that purpose. Most things you might need overtime could be handled by a traditional bike shop, provided they don't have some stigma against electric bikes. Most traditional bike shops are more experienced at that sort of stuff anyway. I would reach out to your local shops and see how they feel about servicing your bike, many will be cool with it, but some may not. Even though the bikes don't require much assembly we generally recommend they get assembled at a bike shop just to make sure everything is operating optimally.

The Street would fit you best, but the Pedego 26" City Commuter could fit as well. The saddle on the Pedego can't go as low because of the rear rack. Feel free to reach out if I can help further.
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
Thanks again, Chris! Your responses are very helpful, not only for me but for everyone who reads this thread.

{I ordered a MTB riser handlebar replacement for my existing Hybrid bike, that will bring up the height by 3 inches and also give me some sweepback. I may end up with an adjustable stem as well, we'll see. My current seat is very comfy but that too may need to change. Getting old really sucks, but the alternative isn't good either. ;-) }

Good info on the modular aspect of eBikes. My Specialized LBS guys actually cringed when I mentioned an eBike was in my future (perhaps they forget they sell their own Specialized Turbo eBike?), so I know they won't do anything for any bike I purchase that isn't one of theirs. The good news is there are other local bike shops in my area as well as independent folks who can work on bikes, so for things like wheel or tire replacement, truing, and other basic bike maintenance things I'm sure I can find assistance somewhere.

The only issue remaining is warranty-covered work, with no local resource that is an authorized service center for Easy Motion. If Easy Motion really wants to capture better marketshare in the U.S., they need to have a program where people who purchase one of their bikes who live more than 90 min from an authorized dealer can be partnered with a local bikeshop to do warranty work, rather than have to ship the ebike somewhere or otherwise take a long roadtrip to get the ebike in for service. This is really a big deal because if there's one thing that is certain, it's that all bikes need service from time-to-time. I'm not mechanically-inclined beyond the very basics of following some simple directions, and have zero interest in becoming a bike mechanic. Just like I don't work on my car, I don't want to have to work on my bike either, other than put air in the tires or add a couple accessories. (Yes I know it saves money to learn to do basic repairs on one's own bike).
 

Chris Nolte

Well-Known Member
Thanks again, Chris! Your responses are very helpful, not only for me but for everyone who reads this thread.

{I ordered a MTB riser handlebar replacement for my existing Hybrid bike, that will bring up the height by 3 inches and also give me some sweepback. I may end up with an adjustable stem as well, we'll see. My current seat is very comfy but that too may need to change. Getting old really sucks, but the alternative isn't good either. ;-) }

Good info on the modular aspect of eBikes. My Specialized LBS guys actually cringed when I mentioned an eBike was in my future (perhaps they forget they sell their own Specialized Turbo eBike?), so I know they won't do anything for any bike I purchase that isn't one of theirs. The good news is there are other local bike shops in my area as well as independent folks who can work on bikes, so for things like wheel or tire replacement, truing, and other basic bike maintenance things I'm sure I can find assistance somewhere.

The only issue remaining is warranty-covered work, with no local resource that is an authorized service center for Easy Motion. If Easy Motion really wants to capture better marketshare in the U.S., they need to have a program where people who purchase one of their bikes who live more than 90 min from an authorized dealer can be partnered with a local bikeshop to do warranty work, rather than have to ship the ebike somewhere or otherwise take a long roadtrip to get the ebike in for service. This is really a big deal because if there's one thing that is certain, it's that all bikes need service from time-to-time. I'm not mechanically-inclined beyond the very basics of following some simple directions, and have zero interest in becoming a bike mechanic. Just like I don't work on my car, I don't want to have to work on my bike either, other than put air in the tires or add a couple accessories. (Yes I know it saves money to learn to do basic repairs on one's own bike).
You can have work done at a non Easy Motion dealer and generally we try to work with you on the expenses of the warranty service labor. The most difficult job is under an hour though, from our experience that would be something like the replacement of a torque sensor, it's only difficult because you need to snake the wire through a small space and add a connector. We've only had two of them though and we've sold hundreds of bikes.
 
D

Deleted member 803

Guest
Whatever you decide, you should first test ride extensively to make sure the bike is appropriate for all purchase considerations...price, comfort, range, ease of use, support et. al. I would err on the side of a local stocking dealer. While it is true that aside from the motor, controller, and battery, the rest of the bike is serviceable by any competent mechanic, if you need warranty stuff you are highly inconvenienced without local support. Stick with a MAJOR brand and you will find build quality and support to be reasonably good. I would avoid department store non-brands. I would suggest that if there is an REI store near you that you visit as they stock, sell, and service e-bikes. Good luck...
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
I am only considering major, well-known and highly rated ebikes, so not to worry, 86 and still kicking. The brands and specific models I'm looking at are in the title of this thread.

The closest Easy Motion dealer to me is about 250 mi away.

My local eBike shop carries Prodeco Tech and Currie eBikes, though doesn't have what I want to see in stock at this time.

I know I need to extensively test and ride and test some more to make sure whatever bike I decide to purchase will be the right one for me.
 

Chris Nolte

Well-Known Member
PowerMe - I was just checking and I think the 2015 Path+ Step Thru might fit you. The 2014 was only available in a large size, but the new one has a medium size which may work. If your local bike shop has it, it may be worth a shot.
 

irenewg13

Active Member
Hi,

What did you get? I'm 5'4", and I too have bike size issues. The Pedego Interceptor really did fit well. I would like a very good bike, but also attractive. Silly, but...
Probably am getting the PI.
I also have neck and generally spine problems. Thanks for possting it.

Irene
 

GatorBob

Member
I have neck/back pain from the riding position (never ending bike drama), plus I'm so weak I can only manage to ride 5 to 7 miles on flat paths.
The following is simply an effort to be helpful. It's IMO, FWIW and YMMV. I will be 87 next February. Height 5"9+, uster be 5'11+. Weight 165. Brain and body work well. Fingers crossed at all times. ;=))

RE: STRENGTH: I've been doing a 45 minute weight machine circuit 3 times a week since age 70. (My first 3 months with a qualified trainer.) Strength and balance are not a problem.

RE: ENDURANCE: Year round, I ride an indoor recumbent training bike 3x a week, 5 miles in 25 minutes.

RE: BACK , NECK AND BUTT PAIN: I have age-related spinal stenosis. Also, in 1989 I suffered serious whiplash neck injury when a car without brakes hit the back of my stopped car. Also, over time I developed an increasingly tender butt. So I quit high end hybrid bikes for high end recumbents and since last Fall I've mostly ridden a long, heavy step-through "beach cruiser style " Pedego Interceptor III with a Brooks saddle and Thudbuster seat post. Net result: my back and neck and butt all feel OK after rides.
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
Hi,

What did you get? I'm 5'4", and I too have bike size issues. The Pedego Interceptor really did fit well. I would like a very good bike, but also attractive. Silly, but...
Probably am getting the PI.
I also have neck and generally spine problems. Thanks for possting it.

Irene
Hi @irenewg13 ,

I purchased the 2015 EVO Street, which I received late March

Good luck with your decision!