EasyMotion Neo Volt Sport

David Herbert

New Member
The aim of this thread is to seek help and advice about my new Neo Volt Sport. I bought it from a dealer on the other side of Australia and it was delivered without an owner's manual. It's the European pedelec version.

I have a few urgent problems to resolve. Last night I camped on Trinity's thudbuster thread and asked for help to unfold my bike. No really. I'm not the smartest guy in town and my problems start at a very basic level. Anyway, Crazy Lenny sorted that out for me - thank you Lenny.

I charged the battery, put the bike together, clicked the control module into the socket on the handlebar and rode the bike around the block. But this was pedalling only, because I can't figure out how to switch on the electrics. My last two bikes were fairly intuitive. You insert the key, turn it clockwise, twist the throttle and the bike goes.
The Neo Volt Sport has a key, but it's only function seems to be locking and unlocking the battery to the frame.

Please would someone tell me what I have to do to enjoy some electric travel. I've uploaded a couple of pics in case they help you to tell me what to do
 

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Lenny

Well-Known Member
It's a wonderful little bike.
Once you place the console, press the power button and hold it for 3-5 seconds and wait till the controller boots up.
You can change the level of assist by pressing (+) or (-) button. You can see this in action @ 3 min 45sec in this video:

For any sort of technical info or parts, Dean at Sydney Electric Bikes should be able help you. They are one of the largest BH dealers in AU.
http://www.sydneyelectricbikes.com.au/
 

David Herbert

New Member
Thank you again, Lenny.
So simple when you get the right advice. I've just been round the block on electric (Pedelec) power. There's a car dealer, here in Perth, whose TV advert includes the line "Choose your dealer before you choose your car." With hindsight, I should have applied his advice to electric bikes. Or even better, visited this forum for bike advice before I flashed my Visa. My project for this afternoon is to install a sprung saddle. The skinny blade that's on there is as cruel as the cleaver in a butcher's shop. I'm surprised that Lance Armstrong was able to ride on one of those things six hours each day for a fortnight. The calluses on his butt must have made him look like a baboon in the mating season. No wonder he needed so many drugs.
 

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David Herbert

New Member
Just got back from a 6km test ride on the Neo Volt sport. Speed is excellent, about 30 kph max on the flat. The comfortable saddle makes things tolerable, but I'll still visit Trinity's thread to chat about Thudbusters.

The pedelec system spooks me out and I nearly had a low speed crash negotiating a U turn at the entrance to a pedestrian and bike bridge over the freeway. I'm going a bit too slow and apply a little pedal pressure. Suddenly the thing bolts away and I need to brake. Panic braking stops the bike and I fall over. Not quite head to floor, because the low frame makes it easy to straddle the bike and save it.
On the homeward journey, my chain came off the front chain ring. It didn't jam, thank goodness or I would have to walk home. No chance to get some electric benefit if you can't pedal.

All in all, I had an enjoyable afternoon. Thank you Lenny for your advice.
 

David Herbert

New Member
I bought my Neo Volt Sport because my last bike was stolen from a bike rack outside my office. Not much evidence, but I suspect the thief went thru my stranded wire lock with a bolt cutter.

What do you guys recommend I buy to replace my (unsuccessful) lock?
 

biknut

Active Member
I bought my Neo Volt Sport because my last bike was stolen from a bike rack outside my office. Not much evidence, but I suspect the thief went thru my stranded wire lock with a bolt cutter.

What do you guys recommend I buy to replace my (unsuccessful) lock?

No lock can save your bike if it's left unattended. With a good lock I recommend a gps tracker that will alert you when someone's trying to steal your bike.

Something with these type of features.

http://www.ebay.com
 

David Herbert

New Member
So, anyway, I've had the Neo Volt sport for six weeks now and (with important advice from this forum) I've learned how to unfold it and get it moving. Like my previous electric bikes, it's not perfect and next time I buy, I'll try something different. Some features I like and some have less appeal.
Let's start with the features I like:
Firstly, it has enough power for my needs. I can hold 30 kph on the flat and 7 kph uphill.
The battery has enough storage. I did a 12 km round trip to my office and back on what looks like 20% of the battery storage.
Modern Lithium Ion batteries don't need to be shaped like a box. I like the way this bike's battery is integrated into the styling.
Hydraulic disc brakes are excellent.
Eight Gears. Gear change is good. I only use the top four ratios. has anyone been tempted to install a bigger chainwheel? I guess the lower ratios are essential when the electrics die or fade and you need to pedal home on an overweight pushbike.
Hand grips are fat and comfortable.
And now those with less appeal:
Pedelec is no fun. My previous bikes had throttle control, which made manoeuvring much easier to control. And you can leave the throttle wide open when cruising and just contribute as much leg energy as you like.
I'm annoyed that you need to remove the battery for charging.
I'm unhappy that I can't integrate a thudbuster into the seat post, because the Thudbuster seat post is too short. I have a thubuster left over from a previous bike, so maybe I can get a welding shop to cut off my thudbuster assembly and weld it onto the Neo Volt Sport seat post.
I have no splash protection for wet days. Can anyone recommend some fenders that bolt straight on?
 

David Herbert

New Member
Thank you for the tip and merry Christmas, Power. Throttle control is permitted here in Australia, and it was a feature on my last two electric bikes. I'll follow your advice and check out EBR
 

David Herbert

New Member
Now got 200km (125 miles) on my Neo Volt Sport
The things I like are much the same:
- Good power (I'm a fat old geezer, but nobody stays with me going uphill)
- Adequate range for my needs. It can get me to the office and back twice on a single charge with a bit to spare (I only use the bike as a commuting tool; no recreational use)
- Wonderful hydraulic disc brakes. (Never settle for less)
- Neat and tidy packaging of the electrical components. Very few E-bikes do it better

I'm still annoyed about some things
-Pedelec is not user friendly and is actually a safety risk. What stupid government official made this mandatory? It's not mandatory in Australia - what stupid Ozzie bought a bike with pedelec? Ahem, that would be me.
I've said earlier in this forum that Pedelec transfers responsibility for power selection from rider to some crude device hidden in the hub. It makes blind decisions about how much power to apply and this frequently embarrasses me at low speed. I've popped a few unexpected wheelies and had a couple of clumsy dismounts. But there have been some totally weird happenings - Just lately, I've had trouble with the chain jumping off the chainwheel when I'm cruising in the highest gear. I stopped at the side of the path and began to guide the chain back onto the chain wheel. I was holding one handlebar and slowly moving the pedal with my other hand. The pedelec decided we needed more power and took off. The bike did a vertical wheelie and then we did a few pirouettes together while I tried to get the damn thing under human control. The hard lesson for me was "Turn off the electrics before you touch the chain drive. A couple of weeks later I was explaining my Oops moment to a friend and I lifted the bike into the vertical position to show him. Although I wasn't touching the pedals or chain, the pedelec again saw the need for power and took off like the previous time. I hate the system.
The other negative things I can learn to deal with. I'm sure I'll figure out how to fit a thud buster before the bike jackhammers my arse into schrapnel
It's a pain to remove the battery after each ride, so I can recharge for the next time, but I'll suppress my anger and deal with it.

The bike has developed a new problem. When I'm riding in gear 8 (highest gear) the chain jumps off the chainwheel heading outboard. Nothing touches the chain on it's journey from cassette to chainwheel, and the derailleur only works on the slack side of the chain, so I think this bike has geometry problem designed into the frame. The smallest (and most commonly used) sprocket on the cassette is way out of line with the chainwheel. I need to move my chainwheel outboard by an amount equal to one or more gaps between sprockets on the cassette.

Can anyone suggest a solution, based on experience?

In a related, but different problem, I want to install a chain wheel with more teeth, so my legs can slow down a bit when I'm pedalling to work. Can anybody offer guidance?
 

biknut

Active Member
I have to agree with about pedlec. It's just a legal dodge, and not in any way superior to a throttle.

By son hasn't had any problems with the chain coming off his Neo Carbon, so possibly you could have adjustment issues. He always rides on the middle front ring though. His bike has both pedlec, and a throttle, but the throttle limits at 20 mph, while the pedlec powers till 25 mph.

I agree that having to remove the battery for charging is a pia. It should be easy for the factory to solve this dumb problem. Why they don't in a mystery. It would be much nicer to be able to charge on the bike, or off.
 

Lenny

Well-Known Member
Now got 200km (125 miles) on my Neo Volt Sport
The things I like are much the same:
- Good power (I'm a fat old geezer, but nobody stays with me going uphill)
- Adequate range for my needs. It can get me to the office and back twice on a single charge with a bit to spare (I only use the bike as a commuting tool; no recreational use)
- Wonderful hydraulic disc brakes. (Never settle for less)
- Neat and tidy packaging of the electrical components. Very few E-bikes do it better

I'm still annoyed about some things
-Pedelec is not user friendly and is actually a safety risk. What stupid government official made this mandatory? It's not mandatory in Australia - what stupid Ozzie bought a bike with pedelec? Ahem, that would be me.
I've said earlier in this forum that Pedelec transfers responsibility for power selection from rider to some crude device hidden in the hub. It makes blind decisions about how much power to apply and this frequently embarrasses me at low speed. I've popped a few unexpected wheelies and had a couple of clumsy dismounts. But there have been some totally weird happenings - Just lately, I've had trouble with the chain jumping off the chainwheel when I'm cruising in the highest gear. I stopped at the side of the path and began to guide the chain back onto the chain wheel. I was holding one handlebar and slowly moving the pedal with my other hand. The pedelec decided we needed more power and took off. The bike did a vertical wheelie and then we did a few pirouettes together while I tried to get the damn thing under human control. The hard lesson for me was "Turn off the electrics before you touch the chain drive. A couple of weeks later I was explaining my Oops moment to a friend and I lifted the bike into the vertical position to show him. Although I wasn't touching the pedals or chain, the pedelec again saw the need for power and took off like the previous time. I hate the system.
The other negative things I can learn to deal with. I'm sure I'll figure out how to fit a thud buster before the bike jackhammers my arse into schrapnel
It's a pain to remove the battery after each ride, so I can recharge for the next time, but I'll suppress my anger and deal with it.

The bike has developed a new problem. When I'm riding in gear 8 (highest gear) the chain jumps off the chainwheel heading outboard. Nothing touches the chain on it's journey from cassette to chainwheel, and the derailleur only works on the slack side of the chain, so I think this bike has geometry problem designed into the frame. The smallest (and most commonly used) sprocket on the cassette is way out of line with the chainwheel. I need to move my chainwheel outboard by an amount equal to one or more gaps between sprockets on the cassette.

Can anyone suggest a solution, based on experience?

In a related, but different problem, I want to install a chain wheel with more teeth, so my legs can slow down a bit when I'm pedalling to work. Can anybody offer guidance?

As biknut mentioned, it could be an alignment issue. Local LBS should be able to fix it.
I would be wary of putting any pressure on the chain with bike switched on. Torque sensors can be very finicky at times.
 

Dej

New Member
I now have 54 miles on my volt and I have 2 bars left on the battery which I have only charged once but I use the pedal assist sparingly as well as the throttle. This bike rides like a full sized bike! I really don't see how it could ride any better.
 

Herb

New Member
Now got 200km (125 miles) on my Neo Volt Sport
The things I like are much the same:
- Good power (I'm a fat old geezer, but nobody stays with me going uphill)
- Adequate range for my needs. It can get me to the office and back twice on a single charge with a bit to spare (I only use the bike as a commuting tool; no recreational use)
- Wonderful hydraulic disc brakes. (Never settle for less)
- Neat and tidy packaging of the electrical components. Very few E-bikes do it better

I'm still annoyed about some things
-Pedelec is not user friendly and is actually a safety risk. What stupid government official made this mandatory? It's not mandatory in Australia - what stupid Ozzie bought a bike with pedelec? Ahem, that would be me.
I've said earlier in this forum that Pedelec transfers responsibility for power selection from rider to some crude device hidden in the hub. It makes blind decisions about how much power to apply and this frequently embarrasses me at low speed. I've popped a few unexpected wheelies and had a couple of clumsy dismounts. But there have been some totally weird happenings - Just lately, I've had trouble with the chain jumping off the chainwheel when I'm cruising in the highest gear. I stopped at the side of the path and began to guide the chain back onto the chain wheel. I was holding one handlebar and slowly moving the pedal with my other hand. The pedelec decided we needed more power and took off. The bike did a vertical wheelie and then we did a few pirouettes together while I tried to get the damn thing under human control. The hard lesson for me was "Turn off the electrics before you touch the chain drive. A couple of weeks later I was explaining my Oops moment to a friend and I lifted the bike into the vertical position to show him. Although I wasn't touching the pedals or chain, the pedelec again saw the need for power and took off like the previous time. I hate the system.
The other negative things I can learn to deal with. I'm sure I'll figure out how to fit a thud buster before the bike jackhammers my arse into schrapnel
It's a pain to remove the battery after each ride, so I can recharge for the next time, but I'll suppress my anger and deal with it.

The bike has developed a new problem. When I'm riding in gear 8 (highest gear) the chain jumps off the chainwheel heading outboard. Nothing touches the chain on it's journey from cassette to chainwheel, and the derailleur only works on the slack side of the chain, so I think this bike has geometry problem designed into the frame. The smallest (and most commonly used) sprocket on the cassette is way out of line with the chainwheel. I need to move my chainwheel outboard by an amount equal to one or more gaps between sprockets on the cassette.

Can anyone suggest a solution, based on experience?

In a related, but different problem, I want to install a chain wheel with more teeth, so my legs can slow down a bit when I'm pedalling to work. Can anybody offer guidance?


I'm slowly working through the problems that David Herbert described. The bike now has a customised Thudbuster that fits and works well (See Trinity's thudbuster thread for details). And my local bike shop installed a simple chain restraint that prevents derailing on the chainwheel. When I selected gear 8, the chain would jump off the chainwheel, heading outboard. The bike shop installed a simple bar that doesn't normally touch either the chain or the chain wheel, but guides the chain back into place whenever it gets out of line (see photos). Now, if anybody has advice on how to convert my pedelec to throttle control........................
 

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Herb

New Member
This forum exists because no bike ever leaves the showroom with all the buyer's wishes fulfilled. They all have design flaws. We all start to improve the bikes (are you reading this, Trinity?) and express our views on the forum. Because we're all different, we all have different ideas of what improvements are needed. The good ones are shared and copied. Evolution works the same way, I guess, but on a bigger scale.

My vision of the perfect E-bike is an ultra-reliable Cadillac cruiser that carries me in great comfort and reasonable speed on my 6 km commute to the office each day. I don't need a Tour de France machine and it's easy to resist the urge to race everybody on the bike path. (Racing others on the bike path caused a single vehicle crash which put me in hospital for 3 days a few years ago. The hospital mended a few broken bones and gave me a racectomy to prevent the problem recurring.)

Anyway, the Neo Volt Sport was a good starting place. Compact bike, elegantly packaged battery, plenty of grunt, wonderful brakes and easy to fit in my car. Now that I have installed a fender, lights, the thudbuster and the chain restraint it fits most of my requirements. Irritations remain, however. I hate the pedelec system and will never change my view on that. It's like handing over responsibility for the gas pedal to some dumb dude who has very limited decision making ability. And he never gets injured in any crash he may cause. I don't know how to fix this. It must be fixable, because Neo Volt Sport must have a throttle control version for the USA market.

The other remaining irritation is having to remove the battery for charging. With my previous E-bikes, I came home, propped the bike against my bench in the shed, plugged in the charger and walked away. Five seconds to unplug and I'm ready to ride again. On the Neo Volt Sport the process is much more involved. Find the key (where did I leave that thing?). Unlock and remove the battery. Try not to drop it or chip the paint. Put it on a towel so the timber bench doesn't scratch the paint. Finally, plug in the charger. Then reverse the process when I want to ride again. And be careful not to lose the key. If you lose the key, your next ride may be your last. No key, no charge.

Adding to my annoyance is the knowledge that these two irritations have been eliminated on hundreds of other designs.

But the bottom line is my Neo Volt Sport is closer to what I want than any other machine I've seen in reality or on line. So I think we'll be together until one of us dies. And I'll keep whingeing.