Ebike Market & Major Investments to Grow the Ebike Market and Access

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
BRAIN August 26, 2021

"Industry analysts estimate that more than 12 million electric bikes will be sold in the United States between 2020 and 2030. According to NPD Group data, the 2020 electric bicycle retail market in the United States was estimated to be $547 million, more than double the 2019 market. For 2021, electric bicycle sales aren't slowing down — in the first half of 2021, sales of electric bicycles were up 64% compared to January-June of 2020."

"With the data from NPD Group and our own research showing that 15% of Americans plan to purchase an electric bicycle in the next 10 years, we see nothing but opportunity for this sector of the industry,"

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There's more in the article. The growth numbers are astounding! There's always a ceiling with any market, I'm not sure what that ceiling actually is. Many of these ebikes will be bought for recreation or toys, but once in the garage you never know. We've seen plenty of newcomers to ebikes, where they became a way of life. I've met people that would've never considered bicycle commuting to suddenly try it once they got their ebike. And the scores of people on ebikes at destination trails that never had a chance to ride 40 miles in a day on a regular bike. Ebikes really expand mileage capability and allow a rider to see and experience things they couldn't in any other way.

Offer your friends a test ride! You just might change their lives forever 🙂
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
There are a lot more e scooters then ebikes on the roads now. Easier to carry/store.
Must be an urban thing because I've never seen one. A good last mile solution I think. Not an option for a long commute.

I'm seeing a lot more ebikes than ever before.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
IMO, these numbers would be higher if new e-bikes were easier to find in stores and there weren't such a backlog of orders.
I would add to that the issue regarding getting them serviced. Once these bikes get out there, the shops with the old story line of "if we didn't sell it, we won't work on it", are going to go bye bye. Couldn't happen too quick in my book. If the bikes were easier for folks to get serviced, sales would REALLY take off.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Must be an urban thing because I've never seen one. A good last mile solution I think. Not an option for a long commute.

I'm seeing a lot more ebikes than ever before.
Scooters are not even an option on college campuses here. And if you think lots of 40 or 50 year old office or shop workers are going to zip to work and run errands around town on scooters ... Yallernutz .
Hard enough to get people to consider ebikes. Even if we had any bike infrastructure woth the name.
 

jabberwocky

Well-Known Member
Scooters are not even an option on college campuses here. And if you think lots of 40 or 50 year old office or shop workers are going to zip to work and run errands around town on scooters ... Yallernutz .
Hard enough to get people to consider ebikes. Even if we had any bike infrastructure woth the name.

Scooters are popular in more urban areas because they are really portable and can work with mixed commutes (people who take busses/trains partway, can bring the scooter with them and use it for the legs before and after). I don't think many people are riding them more than a few miles.

Out at the edge of the NoVA suburbs I see a lot of ebikes, with the occasional eskate or scooter. I know all the shops near me are selling lots of ebikes. Walking the dogs on the local MUP I see a fair number of people commuting on them.
 

RunForTheHills

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I would add to that the issue regarding getting them serviced. Once these bikes get out there, the shops with the old story line of "if we didn't sell it, we won't work on it", are going to go bye bye. Couldn't happen too quick in my book. If the bikes were easier for folks to get serviced, sales would REALLY take off.
While I agree that we need more ebike mechanics/techs, I think there are other impediments to dealers working on bikes that they don't sell. Manufacturers would need to make parts and programming tools available outside their dealer network for that to happen.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
While I agree that we need more ebike mechanics/techs, I think there are other impediments to dealers working on bikes that they don't sell. Manufacturers would need to make parts and programming tools available outside their dealer network for that to happen.
And you have to get people to go to their LBS. Scanning the new users request for advice, I see a lot of "what's the best bike for me to order without ever riding an eBike or setting foot in a bike shop?" Makes sense to someone 🤔.
 

RunForTheHills

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
And you have to get people to go to their LBS. Scanning the new users request for advice, I see a lot of "what's the best bike for me to order without ever riding an eBike or setting foot in a bike shop?" Makes sense to someone 🤔.
Maybe. People are reluctant to pay $50-$60/hr to repair a $250 bicycle. Sometimes it is cheaper to just buy a new bike. However, that isn't too steep for a $2500 bicycle. A lot of us work on our own bikes, but not everyone can or wants to do that.
 

Cstefan

Member
Region
USA
Maybe. People are reluctant to pay $50-$60/hr to repair a $250 bicycle. Sometimes it is cheaper to just buy a new bike. However, that isn't too steep for a $2500 bicycle. A lot of us work on our own bikes, but not everyone can or wants to do that.
Around here a number of shops make most of their money through repairs. For me personally while I can do a lot of work myself I’d rather pay a shop to do it.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Maybe. People are reluctant to pay $50-$60/hr to repair a $250 bicycle. Sometimes it is cheaper to just buy a new bike. However, that isn't too steep for a $2500 bicycle. A lot of us work on our own bikes, but not everyone can or wants to do that.
And I forgot to mention the new users that are willing to stretch their budget to $1500 for a really nice bike.
 

RunForTheHills

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
And I forgot to mention the new users that are willing to stretch their budget to $1500 for a really nice bike.
These people are on a tight budget or maybe it is just a toy that they don't want to spend too much money on. However, when the $1500 bike breaks they will want it repaired or it will just sit in the garage and never get ridden again.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
While I agree that we need more ebike mechanics/techs, I think there are other impediments to dealers working on bikes that they don't sell. Manufacturers would need to make parts and programming tools available outside their dealer network for that to happen.
Only if you're talking bikes with a high proprietary parts count/content. Even the bikes with a high percentage of proprietary parts often have many parts that are not proprietary. MANY new bikes have none of this going on, or a very limited amount, making them easy for anyone to work on. Anyone not leaning on the "if we didn't sell it" crutch anyway....

Consider the auto and motorcycle shops that don't have any trouble working on or getting parts for about anything they want to work on - even if it's an antique!

As far as "programming" that's another sore spot, way past due for some serious re-thinking - or in many cases, just starting over.