Ebike newbie who just test-rode an Aventon Level seeking big-picture purchase advise for my intended usage purposes.

Artbarton

New Member
Hi all, I am a new member,and this is my real name (Art Barton). I tried out an Aventon Level bike last week at a dealer, and this was my first ride on an ebike. My primary objective in getting an ebike is to drive less when buying groceries or when going out for coffee without the hassle and extra sweat of taking out a regular bike every time I skip the car. I should explain that I am both an avid road cyclist, who has pedaled (without a motor) over 60,000 miles since I turned 40 years old, and also now definitely a Senior, as I will turn 70 in December. So my needs are changing. And I am looking for some experienced advise on choosing an ebike.

I should note I live on an extremely steep coastal California hill, "only" about 170 feet up from the main road, but that's the equal of 17 stories of a building to cycle up in about 400 yards. Which I do all the time on my regular bike, but mostly without groceries in tow. Also there are numerous long and sometimes steep hills along my usual grocery shopping routes, not just the steep hill I live on. However this is a place with no snow or ice where it only rains notably from late November through early April, so this ebike shopping usage would be very regular, even when accounting for my ongoing recreational road biking.

So I want to pack 25-35 pounds of groceries in panniers on a regular basis. And FYI, while my Trader Joes run may be only 17 miles round trip, it involves about 1200 vertical feet total. So I am looking for an ebike that is optimal for that, assuming I pedal more than most ebikers would, and which does not require a lot of mechanical skills to keep going, as I do only the basic bike maintenance on my own.

Note I found 16-17 MPH plenty fast on my test ride of the Aventon for my intended purpose.

And I think I'm in the right ballpark of price/performance with either the Aventon Level or the Aventon Pace 500, or perhaps the new REI Co-op basic bike https://www.rei.com/product/172495/co-op-cycles-cty-e21-electric-bike. But I also want a bike that will last at least 6 to 7 years of regular (125 trips a year or more) usage, assuming some replacement of chains, cassettes, etc would be necessary. .

So I'm looking for advise on whether that regular usage goal is realistic with those roughly $1400-1800 bikes I'm looking at, given their motor quality?

Also I'm looking for advise on whether front shocks make a big difference in ride comfort for my intended use (the Level has them, the Pace 500 does not) ?

Finally I have a 2nd electric bike envisioned use. There are times when i want to go into our amazingly beautiful mountain reservoir system without having to climb (and descend) 3500 vertical feet on my own power. And that ride is about 45 miles round trip.

Is that a realistic ride in terms of range and hill climbing ability for either of those Aventon bikes, or the new REI one, or similarly priced ebikes for relatively light-weight person, assuming I will pedal a lot more than your average e-biker up and down hills, and also assuming I use the lowest speed/lowest pedal assist mode on all the uphill parts?

Thanks all for answering
 

MMC

Active Member
Kudos to you that you're still riding at 70.
I too have a road bike that I usually ride a few times a week plus on Sat morn group rides, our roadie crew. Also have a normal mountain bike that is strictly for rougher trails where I can ride hard and sometimes fall off of due to that.
Neither are practical for commuter rides or even as grocery getters or anything close to that as any thought of a pannier rack would look silly on both bikes. Either way they are not bikes I would even think of locking up.

So here's where the Level fits in and why I chose it.
Firstly it's an ebike that does not have that battery-attached on the down tube image that a lot of lower end ebikes have.
I also wanted a errand runner kinda bike that wasn't too expensive that I can lock up, and wanted it to look like a normal bike.
So far it has tackled everything I threw at it. I don't go offroad with it, just some hardpack trailing but mostly pavement. Have a couple approx 10 degree grade roads I have tried and no issues at all.
With a 60+ pound bike you definitely need the PAS 1,2 or 3 while climbing.

I personally prefer a front shock on a bike like this mainly due to its weight. The weight of ebikes in general is something I have to get used to.
In progress right now of upgrading a few things on it.
But as a general tourer and errand runner I think it would work out fine. A few times I have ridden it without any assist just for the leg burn.
You being a long time roadie you'll know what I mean. Riding an ebike almost seems too easy sometimes.
 
Artbarton, I have owned my Avenon Level since the first week of September and have just under 400 miles. Based upon the parameters that you spelled out I judge that the Level will suit your needs handily. Based on my battery usage, using PAS 0-1-2 mostly, I think the 'Real World" testing results for mileage on the Level as published on their website is accurate.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
Hi all, I am a new member,and this is my real name (Art Barton). I tried out an Aventon Level bike last week at a dealer, and this was my first ride on an ebike. My primary objective in getting an ebike is to drive less when buying groceries or when going out for coffee without the hassle and extra sweat of taking out a regular bike every time I skip the car. I should explain that I am both an avid road cyclist, who has pedaled (without a motor) over 60,000 miles since I turned 40 years old, and also now definitely a Senior, as I will turn 70 in December. So my needs are changing. And I am looking for some experienced advise on choosing an ebike.

I should note I live on an extremely steep coastal California hill, "only" about 170 feet up from the main road, but that's the equal of 17 stories of a building to cycle up in about 400 yards. Which I do all the time on my regular bike, but mostly without groceries in tow. Also there are numerous long and sometimes steep hills along my usual grocery shopping routes, not just the steep hill I live on. However this is a place with no snow or ice where it only rains notably from late November through early April, so this ebike shopping usage would be very regular, even when accounting for my ongoing recreational road biking.

So I want to pack 25-35 pounds of groceries in panniers on a regular basis. And FYI, while my Trader Joes run may be only 17 miles round trip, it involves about 1200 vertical feet total. So I am looking for an ebike that is optimal for that, assuming I pedal more than most ebikers would, and which does not require a lot of mechanical skills to keep going, as I do only the basic bike maintenance on my own.

Note I found 16-17 MPH plenty fast on my test ride of the Aventon for my intended purpose.

And I think I'm in the right ballpark of price/performance with either the Aventon Level or the Aventon Pace 500, or perhaps the new REI Co-op basic bike https://www.rei.com/product/172495/co-op-cycles-cty-e21-electric-bike. But I also want a bike that will last at least 6 to 7 years of regular (125 trips a year or more) usage, assuming some replacement of chains, cassettes, etc would be necessary. .

So I'm looking for advise on whether that regular usage goal is realistic with those roughly $1400-1800 bikes I'm looking at, given their motor quality?

Also I'm looking for advise on whether front shocks make a big difference in ride comfort for my intended use (the Level has them, the Pace 500 does not) ?

Finally I have a 2nd electric bike envisioned use. There are times when i want to go into our amazingly beautiful mountain reservoir system without having to climb (and descend) 3500 vertical feet on my own power. And that ride is about 45 miles round trip.

Is that a realistic ride in terms of range and hill climbing ability for either of those Aventon bikes, or the new REI one, or similarly priced ebikes for relatively light-weight person, assuming I will pedal a lot more than your average e-biker up and down hills, and also assuming I use the lowest speed/lowest pedal assist mode on all the uphill parts?

Thanks all for answering

Also consider the Espin Sport or Flow. Yes I am biased as a Sport owner, however on paper, the Sport compares favorably with the other bikes you mentioned and retails for $1200...
 

BigNerd

Well-Known Member
I'm going to have to agree with @Taylor57 ... the Espin Sport at $1200 is just as capable and has features of the more expensive bikes and seems to have less issues. The 500w engine is more than capable as I've put it through multiple hills with ease.