Ebike Weight Limits That Include The Bike?

timacn

Member
Hello. I'm thinking about getting an ebike that would be legal to ride on both roads and trails, including bike paths. Around here, that means a Class 1 machine.
I really liked some of the Specialized and Trek models I read about (Specialized Turbo Vado and Como, Trek Allant Plus 7 and Trek Verve Plus 3) but the maximum rated weight of those bikes ranges from around 275-300 lbs and the calculation includes the weight of the bikes themselves in the total. Most of those bikes are pretty hefty and a couple approach 60 pounds. I am an older guy and am about 250 lbs, so my mass plus the weight of the bike usually puts me right up against or over the weight limits of these bikes. Cannondale, however, has a few models that I like and they seem to have a higher weight capacity and also do not include the weight of the bike in their total capacity calculation.

I have two questions: first: I would think that the weight of the bike itself does not put major stress on the frame or components, so my guess is that the frame is not going to break in half if you go over the limit. You might well tax the motor, drain the battery quicker, and maybe pop a few spokes. (Is that correct? I am not an engineer.)

Secondly, could anybody recommend a good ebike that would perform decently on bike paths and roads with a 50-60 mile range and a capacity to handle a 250 pound guy and the weight of a 60 pound bike?

Thanks for your help.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
My Allant+7 is supposedly 47.5 lbs, as shipped. If you add a few accessories like a different saddle, seat stem, bar ends, tools, bags, etc., you can easily get over 50 lbs.
I'm no engineer but I wouldn’t go over the listed weight limit and push the bike at all. Just asking for a failure somewhere. I also don’t know of a bike that will get 310 lbs of bike and man over 50 miles.
 
My brother easily weighs over 250 lbs. For that very reason he rides a Riese & Muller Charger which even in "basic" trim should be good 50 miles with pedal assist but with the dual battery option would go much further.

It ain't cheap though.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
My yubabike left is rated 100 kg rider 100 kg cargo. I've had it up to 400 lb gross with groceries/weed killer. That is on 2.1" tires. With tools bags motor battery it is 94 lb light. I can fix anything but crank problems on the road.
You seriously don't want to break a steering fork. Head to road, maximum impact.
Heavier duty steel frames are available from surlybikes. they have an electric cargo model. The stretch frame biases your weight on the front tire, which evens out the load on the tires if you sit upright. If you're a head forward flat back rider, drop handlebar bikes are balanced with a short frame.
My ebikeling geared hub motor had about a 35 miles range over 77 hills with 60 lb cargo & 170 lb me, on a 17.5 ah battery. I've just changed to MAC12 geared hub motor, seems to be more efficient. I'm using 53 to 49.4 v or about half charge on 30 miles now, but that is pedaling a lot unpowered on the flatter portions.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
I'm 260 and encountered the same problem when bike shopping 3 years ago. I chose a Pedego Platinum Interceptor step thru with mag wheels which is rated at 350# excluding the 60# weight of the bike. I've had a lot of spoke failures on many of my bikes but the mag wheels solved that problem. I sometimes carry a lot of cargo and have over 2500 miles on the bike with no issues.


Stock (4)a.jpg

I like an upright riding position so I changed the handlebars and added a stem riser. It was an easy, inexpensive modification that took less than an hour.

Compare (1).jpg

It's a class 2 bike but the throttle can be turned off via programming. It can also be unplugged and easily removed to make the bike a class 1 if desired.
With the 15 ah battery, it has an advertised range of 45 - 50 miles but my record so far is 58.
 

Lantley

Member
Another vote for a Pedego Model with upgraded mag rims. Pedego has a few models to choose from. Upgrade the wheels and you can gain lots of weight capacity. While I did lots of reading on Ebikes in general. I did not do a lot of comparing models and manufactures.
However when I came across Pedego's clearly stated option to increase weight capacity and dedicated local stores I was sold.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
First, I wouldn't be real concerned about class specific limitations. They're old and they're stupid, have VERY little actual enforcement behind them, and are being rethought everywhere. They were written in a hurry with little thought or experience by the writers, in a knee jerk reaction to have SOMETHING in place. Florida for instance, recently ruled they will not be recognizing the difference between the 3 classes. E--bikes are now treated as bicycles everywhere in that state. You can go anywhere they can.

Regarding weight capacity, I'm 69, 6'2" and 315 lbs. Have been riding a RAD rated at 275lbs for 3 years now, with NO weight related issues - including spokes. RAD does have some spoke issues because the people building their wheels leave a little to be desired, with many spoke related issues noted. If the spokes are dealt with when the bike is new, as they SHOULD be if/when properly serviced, then there are no further issues. I'd also mention that my original hub motor has been replaced with a MUCH more powerful aftermarket motor, as I spend a lot of time riding in an area with some pretty big hills. Point here being, I'm likely the worst possible case scenario when it comes to "weight ratings" and am have NO issues.......

Purchase your bike in peace, take care of it, and I doubt seriously you'll have any issues.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
Riding style plays into the engineered weight limit. If you never jump a curb and never hit a big pot hole, you can get by with exceeding the specified weight limit. But if you constantly send high shock loads into the bike, your small amount over the weight limit will now greatly exceed the limit and you will have mechanical issues.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Hello. I'm thinking about getting an ebike that would be legal to ride on both roads and trails, including bike paths. Around here, that means a Class 1 machine.
I really liked some of the Specialized and Trek models I read about (Specialized Turbo Vado and Como, Trek Allant Plus 7 and Trek Verve Plus 3) but the maximum rated weight of those bikes ranges from around 275-300 lbs and the calculation includes the weight of the bikes themselves in the total. Most of those bikes are pretty hefty and a couple approach 60 pounds. I am an older guy and am about 250 lbs, so my mass plus the weight of the bike usually puts me right up against or over the weight limits of these bikes. Cannondale, however, has a few models that I like and they seem to have a higher weight capacity and also do not include the weight of the bike in their total capacity calculation.

I have two questions: first: I would think that the weight of the bike itself does not put major stress on the frame or components, so my guess is that the frame is not going to break in half if you go over the limit. You might well tax the motor, drain the battery quicker, and maybe pop a few spokes. (Is that correct? I am not an engineer.)

Secondly, could anybody recommend a good ebike that would perform decently on bike paths and roads with a 50-60 mile range and a capacity to handle a 250 pound guy and the weight of a 60 pound bike?

Thanks for your help.
The load ratings that Specialized publishes for all thier bikes & ebikes does not include the bike weight. Their load ratings = rider weight + cargo. This is detailed in the attached Specialized Manual Appendix.

The Specialized Como/Vado series bikes are rated for a 300lb load and would have no problems with a 250lb rider.

Test rides are a good idea to get the best fit and get a feel for the capabilities of the different models. The Como series is a more up right style than the Vado. The Como 4 is a more capable climber than the Como 3, and so on.
 

Attachments

  • 0000093943.pdf
    1.5 MB · Views: 37

timacn

Member
Thanks to everybody for this information. I SWEAR I recently saw a Specialized document that had a lower weight ceiling, but that must have been an older document. I appreciate the up to date info. The Vado would be a bike I would strongly consider, but I've been told they are all now Class 3 bikes, and therefore unlawful in Pennsylvania. (Hopefully my info on that last point is also outdated.)
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Thanks to everybody for this information. I SWEAR I recently saw a Specialized document that had a lower weight ceiling, but that must have been an older document. I appreciate the up to date info. The Vado would be a bike I would strongly consider, but I've been told they are all now Class 3 bikes, and therefore unlawful in Pennsylvania. (Hopefully my info on that last point is also outdated.)
@Art Deco rides a Como 3 in PA. I believe the Como 3 is a Class 1 ebike. Perhaps he can share his experience? As to the Vados, I believe you are right that the 3, 4, & 5 models are Class 3 ebikes. The Vado 2 is Class 1, but was discontinued after 2019. Some dealers are advertising these at close out pricing. Sizes are limited.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Thanks to everybody for this information. I SWEAR I recently saw a Specialized document that had a lower weight ceiling, but that must have been an older document. I appreciate the up to date info. The Vado would be a bike I would strongly consider, but I've been told they are all now Class 3 bikes, and therefore unlawful in Pennsylvania. (Hopefully my info on that last point is also outdated.)
Pennsylvania is now considering legalizing class 3 for road use. Might take some time to get it through. There is a very active group of Specialized riders here that can advise on those models.

Talks began this summer to possibly include class 2 bikes in Pennsylvania on state owned land. That's being driven by hunters, I have no idea the strength of support. Currently only class 1 are allowed on state land, with a bike itself limited to 75 pounds. There's no limit to overall weight of bike, rider, gear in the regs. The class 2 consideration has been tabled until the PA DCNR can meet in person, which apparently won't happen until pandemic restrictions are relaxed.

Welcome @timacn from a neighbor across the river!
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
@Art Deco rides a Como 3 in PA. I believe the Como 3 is a Class 1 ebike. Perhaps he can share his experience? As to the Vados, I believe you are right that the 3, 4, & 5 models are Class 3 ebikes. The Vado 2 is Class 1, but was discontinued after 2019. Some dealers are advertising these at close out pricing. Sizes are limited.
2019 Como 3 and Vado 3 were both class1, the 4 and 5 versions of both models were class 3. Don't know about the new models.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
It appears that the Como and Vado 4s are class1 this year but have the stronger motor and bigger battery than the 3s. If I recall the lbs mentioned getting in a pair of 4s in each model because of that.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Good to know. Specialized seems to change models and specs from year to year. Como 4s were once class1, I believe. Since my lbs never stocked class 3 and he had a new pair of Como 4s on the floor ( and not much else) a week ago...I thought he said they all are stickered alike. Visually they are the same bike frames with better battery and motor and mechanicals as you spend more.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Back to OP, torque is your friend where weights are involved. I would avoid my "e" type motor ... stock on the Como 3. there are threads on this.