EGO battery

Ccount

Active Member
I picked up an EGO brand Lithium Ion 56v 2.5 Ah battery and charger at a garage sale for next to nothing. It is small, light, and appears to be a well rated popular heavy duty battery for large yard tools like lawn mowers and snow blowers. I see they make them up to 80v and 10Ah, and many other variations. I am going to fabricate a battery cable so I can plug into my RadRunner (I have a 35Ah controller and true 750w Bafang motor, if it matters). I realize I cannot run it in parallel with the stock battery, but otherwise, can you see any issues with utilizing it as a back up battery? I anticipate it should be good for 5 miles of above average speed backup support?
 

legsofbeer

Active Member
I picked up an EGO brand Lithium Ion 56v 2.5 Ah battery and charger at a garage sale for next to nothing. It is small, light, and appears to be a well rated popular heavy duty battery for large yard tools like lawn mowers and snow blowers. I see they make them up to 80v and 10Ah, and many other variations. I am going to fabricate a battery cable so I can plug into my RadRunner (I have a 35Ah controller and true 750w Bafang motor, if it matters). I realize I cannot run it in parallel with the stock battery, but otherwise, can you see any issues with utilizing it as a back up battery? I anticipate it should be good for 5 miles of above average speed backup support?
Mommy, why is that guy's bicycle on fire?

(I could be wrong, just, danger, Will Robinson)
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
There is an adapter available for the EGO battery:

81fpG72CfvL._AC_SL1500_.jpg

It might save you some trouble when trying to wire the battery. The adapter uses 10 gauge wire which should be sufficient.

I used a similar adapter for a DeWalt battery on my bike.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
I was thinking that might work until you mentioned "above average speed backup support". There COULD be an issue there. I don't know too much about it, but in simple terms, the 3 phase motors require the controller to do some high speed switching to make the motor turn. The faster the motor goes, the faster that switching needs to be done.

The KT controller's ability to switch that quickly, to work well enough to take advantage of voltages over 48v, MIGHT be in question. I say that because there were quite a few raised eyebrows when I first successfully hooked up a KT controller to the MAC motor. When researching that install, there were a few that didn't think the KT could switch fast enough. Thankfully it worked out really well and that's no longer a "sketchy" install. The question in my mind comes in when you ask the KT to switch even faster.... -Al
 

taxi leen

New Member
Ik dacht dat dat zou kunnen werken, totdat je het had over "ondersteuning voor back-ups boven de gemiddelde snelheid". Er zou daar een probleem kunnen zijn. Ik weet er niet veel van, maar in eenvoudige bewoordingen vereisen de 3-fasemotoren dat de controller op hoge snelheid schakelt om de motor te laten draaien. Hoe sneller de motor gaat, hoe sneller er moet worden geschakeld.

Het vermogen van de KT-controller om dat snel te schakelen, om goed genoeg te werken om te profiteren van spanningen van meer dan 48 V, is MISSCHIEN in het geding. Ik zeg dat omdat er nogal wat opgetrokken wenkbrauwen waren toen ik voor het eerst met succes een KT-controller op de MAC-motor aansluit. Bij het onderzoeken van die installatie waren er een paar die niet dachten dat de KT snel genoeg kon schakelen. Gelukkig is het heel goed gelukt en dat is niet langer een "schetsmatige" installatie. De vraag in mijn hoofd komt binnen als je de KT vraagt om nog sneller te schakelen ... -Al
hallo ik heb een gigantische fastroad ex pro 25 km met de accu van 375 wh nu wil ik deze op warderen naar 600wh maar er zit een code in waardoor dat niet kan weet iemand
hoe die code er uit gaat;kijk een nieuwe is altijd te koop
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
The KT controller's ability to switch that quickly, to work well enough to take advantage of voltages over 48v, MIGHT be in question. I say that because there were quite a few raised eyebrows when I first successfully hooked up a KT controller to the MAC motor.
This has to do with the controller's ability to keep the three motor phases synchronized at high RPM. At 25 mph, a typical 26" wheel is spinning 311 rpm. The Bafang G60 fat tire motor has an internal 5:1 gear ratio, so that's 1555 rpm for the motor. It's not a problem for a motor that uses Hall sensors.

Problems arise with sensorless controllers, where the controller has to (quickly) analyze the current on each phase. I've got Q100 motors with internal gearing of 8:1. I've read that a sensorless controller loses track when you spin the Q100 above 25 mph. These are little motors though, and they only spin that fast when the rider is doing half the work. Solution is to use sensorless controllers where they make sense.
 
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Ccount

Active Member
There is an adapter available for the EGO battery:

View attachment 74393

It might save you some trouble when trying to wire the battery. The adapter uses 10 gauge wire which should be sufficient.

I used a similar adapter for a DeWalt battery on my bike.
Thanks for the lead. Why reinvent the wheel? I ordered one today!
 

Ccount

Active Member
I finally got around to mounting my EGO battery pack on my Rad Runner. It is 56v, 2.5 Ah, and I mounted it with a 3D printed mount and plug acquired on then net. I was disappointed to see that my speed and acceleration actually decreased compared to my stock 48v battery pack. I know from other hobbies I enjoy, that a lithium-ion and li-po battery cell must have a "C" rating high enough to allow it to discharge fast enough to meet the load, (as well as to accept a faster charge). Is it possible the "C" ratings on the EGO battery cells are not sufficient to handle the demands of the 35A controller and true 750w motor? Am I barking up the wrong tree here? Also, is it possible the BMS in the EGO pack is not up to the challenge presented by the ebike? The battery reads over 60v fully charged, and it will work for a respectable time on the bike, just not very well, under larger demand (more throttle). Any thoughts or ideas? Thanks!
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
I have NO knowledge of your EGO pack. That in mind, some thoughts. Thinking 35a shouldn't be much of a bottleneck powering a 750w motor. 20a is a bunch really. 35a going to support 1500w or more, which should provide you with pretty decent power/acceleration.

I'm wondering about the connectors used, and the wire, all of it. Are these up to the task? Could there be a bottleneck there? Have you been back over your work to see if there may be any tell tale signs of excessive heat?

As a very long time RC'er, pretty familiar with the difference in "C" ratings too. The C rating on the cells you used? Have you checked to see if your cell voltages match to see if the pack is balanced, no low cells hiding in the middle? -Al
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
You are using too small of a battery. I did't note the AH rating when I said it would work fine. My error. That fact that it does work shows that the EGo packs are pretty tough,

A 52V2.5AH Ego pack (BA1110 and BA1120) is 14S-1p (14 cells in series). A good 18650 cell is about 10A, so I am afraid that's all that is going into your 35A controller. Good for running at low speed. Crack the throttle and the battery says sorry, I'm done. A 52V4Ah (BA2240) will probably get you up to 20A.

You probably want to have a pair of 52V4AH Ego packs in parallel to have any performance, and now it's getting expensive.
 
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6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
I finally got around to mounting my EGO battery pack on my Rad Runner. It is 56v, 2.5 Ah, and I mounted it with a 3D printed mount and plug acquired on then net. I was disappointed to see that my speed and acceleration actually decreased compared to my stock 48v battery pack. I know from other hobbies I enjoy, that a lithium-ion and li-po battery cell must have a "C" rating high enough to allow it to discharge fast enough to meet the load, (as well as to accept a faster charge). Is it possible the "C" ratings on the EGO battery cells are not sufficient to handle the demands of the 35A controller and true 750w motor? Am I barking up the wrong tree here? Also, is it possible the BMS in the EGO pack is not up to the challenge presented by the ebike? The battery reads over 60v fully charged, and it will work for a respectable time on the bike, just not very well, under larger demand (more throttle). Any thoughts or ideas? Thanks!
I get similar results when using my DeWalt tool batteries. They work fairly well when cruising at 10 - 12 mph but their performance fades when I exceed that speed.

I carry mine for emergencies in case I over extend the range of my main battery. I can count on it for a few extra miles at nominal speeds.