Electric Bicycle Fatalities & Injuries Are Rising

AZOldTech

Active Member
When e-bikers start killing not just themselves but pedestrians as well, I can foresee that some rules are coming to be put in place to protect the public IMO.
Electric Bicycle Fatalities & Injuries Are Rising
https://cleantechnica.com/2018/10/31/electric-bicycle-fatalities-injuries-are-rising/

In London, UK last month, Sakine Cihan was hit by an electric bicycle and subsequently died in the hospital. This tragic incident isn’t alone. Electric bicycles have been implicated in deaths in studies from the Netherlands, Israel, and Beijing, although almost all of those fatalities were on the part of cyclists, not pedestrians. Studies in Israel and Switzerlandfound more injuries, again almost entirely to users of electric bicycles, not others.
........much more
UK's first electric bicycle death as female pedestrian dies in hospital after 'hit-and-run'
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/20...icycle-death-female-pedestrian-dies-hospital/
 

LewSchiller

Active Member
Terrible...but anything moving striking something walking is going to end up badly.
"
Department for Transport figures show that between 2007 and 2016, pedestrians killed in collisions involving cyclists represented 0.6 per cent of total casualties on UK roads at 29. Duncan Dollimore, head of campaigns at the national charity Cycling UK, said: "The statistics show cyclists, whether on a conventional or e-bike, present a minimal danger to others. "
"Given the limitations and current laws governing e-bikes, Cycling UK does not believe there is any reason to suggest their use poses any greater risk to the public than a normal pedal cycle."
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
A perfect example of 2 very different spins on very similar type incidents. One glass half full, the other half empty.
 

AZOldTech

Active Member
I think it is logical to assume that when you allow a little throttle button to take you >20mph, accidents will happen. When you add to that inexperienced people who never would have gone >20mph even on a regular bike, AND older age people, injuries and fatalities will increase. That is not to say that there were not any injuries by regular bikers before, just that when you add a motor to the equation in addition to speed and an inexperienced older rider, injuries (and fatalities too) would go up.
 
Last edited:

slowguy

Member
I thought the physics of stopping from high mph and the high percentage of men over 60 involved in bad events, was interesting and thought provoking. We certainly have lower response rates and fitness to correct for or avoid events. It feels great to have a 16 mph run down a trail and then you realize a really badly lying walnut shell on a wet trail could ruin a nice day. The article is worth a full read if you are over 60 and are one of the many readers here who want more speed.
 

slowguy

Member
Sorry should have included this quote from the article.
" In the Netherlands, the study shows that it’s mostly older male cyclists who are ending up in the hospital or worse. 31 of 38 fatalities in the study were men over 65. The study’s authors point to several factors which combine to cause issues. The increased speed of the electric bicycles vs pedal bikes in the same age cohort suggests that reduced time to react combined with slower reaction times was a factor."
 

Philly5834

New Member
When e-bikers start killing not just themselves but pedestrians as well, I can foresee that some rules are coming to be put in place to protect the public IMO.
Electric Bicycle Fatalities & Injuries Are Rising
https://cleantechnica.com/2018/10/31/electric-bicycle-fatalities-injuries-are-rising/

In London, UK last month, Sakine Cihan was hit by an electric bicycle and subsequently died in the hospital. This tragic incident isn’t alone. Electric bicycles have been implicated in deaths in studies from the Netherlands, Israel, and Beijing, although almost all of those fatalities were on the part of cyclists, not pedestrians. Studies in Israel and Switzerlandfound more injuries, again almost entirely to users of electric bicycles, not others.
........much more
UK's first electric bicycle death as female pedestrian dies in hospital after 'hit-and-run'
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/20...icycle-death-female-pedestrian-dies-hospital/
Interesting and, I think, an important caution for seniors. The same factors that might lead a senior to use an e-bike rather than a diamond frame
 

larry-new

Active Member
This is a motorized vehicle. Knowing how to ride a bicycle is not enough...there are other things that must be learned.

Stopping at speed takes practice...any higher speed than you're used to travelling, combined with riding a heavier vehicle.
 

Philly5834

New Member
Interesting point. Ran into the Amsterdam figures earlier while doing some research. I figured out that the same factors that might lead seniors to seek out e-bikes--decreased mobility and flexibility as a result of aging--, might decrease their ability to control an e-bike. Indeed, on my e-trike, once or twice I've found myself startled by a sudden surge of speed when I temporarily turned on the e-assist to facilitate my crossing a street, But forewarned is forearmed-- we just have to be aware of the potential of that little motor.
 

larry-new

Active Member
Unfortunately, the ebike can be used to speed a rider well past their bike handling experience...all exhilarating until those pesky stops and turns. I'd be a fool to attempt trail riding, for example, when my entire riding experience has been on paved roads...I'd be starting over. Traffic situations are similar...choose wisely, be very visible, learn more each day.
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
When e-bikers start killing not just themselves but pedestrians as well, I can foresee that some rules are coming to be put in place to protect the public IMO.
Electric Bicycle Fatalities & Injuries Are Rising
https://cleantechnica.com/2018/10/31/electric-bicycle-fatalities-injuries-are-rising/

In London, UK last month, Sakine Cihan was hit by an electric bicycle and subsequently died in the hospital. This tragic incident isn’t alone. Electric bicycles have been implicated in deaths in studies from the Netherlands, Israel, and Beijing, although almost all of those fatalities were on the part of cyclists, not pedestrians. Studies in Israel and Switzerlandfound more injuries, again almost entirely to users of electric bicycles, not others.
........much more
UK's first electric bicycle death as female pedestrian dies in hospital after 'hit-and-run'
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/20...icycle-death-female-pedestrian-dies-hospital/

Many Swiss e-bike fatalities and serious injuries are due to elderly riders not mastering their bikes. The number of falls without a collision is very high. But he authorities don’t seem to want to take any measures. This is partially why the 45km/h speed category sees a lot less serious injuries than the slower 25km/h variant. More on that below.

As a Swiss person, I’m not too worried about my own safety as the roads I frequent are fairly friendly. But in the major cities more effort needs to be made for the elderly. It takes a lot of attention to ride in traffic and the infra tends to either be somewhat acceptable or simply plain bad. But as bike paths are now part of the Swiss constitution this should slowly be addressed. Remains the problem of the elderly falling and injuring themselves alone. An E-bike licence for the elderly has been discussed. A special doctor’s note was also another idea. Once you subtract the elderly from the equation, the number of accidents is actually quite similar to regular bikes. So it’s not an e-bike problem, but rather a more general problem for bicycle users as a whole. Bicycles are the only means of Swiss transportation where fatalities have increased. And when I say bicycles, this includes 25km/h e-bikes (which are legally bicycles).

The Speed = more danger theory has been somewhat disproved by the ongoing Swiss experiment since 2012. It has shown that the reality is much more complex than a simple equation. The 45km/h riders have had less % of serious accidents than the slower category. If you ask why, the answer could be explained by several factors:

- Plates: they discourage riders from doing stupid things, like blasting through red lights...

- Eye exam: you can ride a 25km/m bike with bad eye vision. The faster category requires an eye exam.

- License: That means learning what traffic signs mean. Anyone can ride a 25km/h e-bike...

- Components: the 45km/h category requires a COC. That means the brakes and lights have been tested in labs. Some of the 25km/h home made stuff is the culprit here. In a hilly country you need great brakes, no matter what top speed of assist is provided.

- Age and fitness: the 25km/h category is made up of a much higher proportion of older riders who are more at risk of falling than the faster 45km/h category.
 
Last edited:

PaD

Well-Known Member
2C0CDF23-C57B-4B21-B915-8AA2AB5C9494.jpeg
I think that, regardless of age, a lot of new e-bikers ride faster in various places and situations because with the e-bike they accelerate so much quicker than they could with their regular bicycle. This causes potentionally dangerous situations more often in e.g. crowded places.
 

LewSchiller

Active Member
View attachment 26971
I think that, regardless of age, a lot of new e-bikers ride faster in various places and situations because with the e-bike they accelerate so much quicker than they could with their regular bicycle. This causes potentionally dangerous situations more often in e.g. crowded places.
I just went through a bit of brain damage to figure out how to reset my controller from "power" to "Eco" since I found my pedal assist to be too aggressive. The slightest pedal movement caused a surge of acceleration that was hard to control. Now it's more of a "sweep".
 
  • Like
Reactions: PaD

PaD

Well-Known Member
I just went through a bit of brain damage to figure out how to reset my controller from "power" to "Eco" since I found my pedal assist to be too aggressive. The slightest pedal movement caused a surge of acceleration that was hard to control. Now it's more of a "sweep".
Most e-bikes in Turbo or max setting can in the hands (or feet:)) of a novice present Youtube-worthy moments.
Eco mode was my setting for 98% of wy riding. My Vado was in my opinion a bit slow from a standstill as I had to pedal 1/3 or 1/2 a turn of crank before motor assist kicked in. Well it didn’t kick really, it was quite smooth.
But still most e-bikes reaches speed very much quicker than most cyclist do with their regulars bikes.
Maybe that delay is a good thing after all. I think I’ll go for a Vado again after winter.
 
Last edited:

Drew

Active Member
Mike, thanks for sharing what you see as the shortcomings of the article, but I think your position is grossly exaggerated. Furthermore, as a an e-bike reseller, you're hardly unbiased yourself.
 
Last edited:

DDBB

Well-Known Member
I think Mike was pretty much spot on w/ his post. The ebike accident negative reporting is what's grossly exaggerated.. JMO
 

AZOldTech

Active Member
You better believe it Mike's position is biased and grossly exaggerated. But let's all shut out the "fake news media" or what he calls it "lamestream media"... cause what we won't hear or read won't hurt us... sheesh... too bad these same people don't take their own advice and shut out the REAL fake news media that always lie the loudest to peddle their fake news...

There is nothing fake that ebikes give access to anyone at any age to go speeds that they have never gone before. So an increase in accidents is bound to happen.
 
Last edited:

AZOldTech

Active Member
From the Netherlands: Electric bike injuries mount, 102 e-cyclists have died since 2014
https://www.dutchnews.nl/news/2018/...es-mount-102-e-cyclists-have-died-since-2014/
In total, people on e-bikes were involved in 341 accidents in the first part of 2018, a 26% rise on 2017, the paper said, quoting police and insurance company figures. Since 2014, 102 e-bike users have died in traffic accidents, 23 of whom have died since the end of last September.

E-bike users are particularly prone to head, arm and leg injuries and their injuries are twice as likely to be serious than ordinary bike users, surgeon Jeroen Poos told the paper.
 

DDBB

Well-Known Member
The only speeds I've never gone before on my ebike compared to my acoustic bike is uphill where I might be going 7mph instead of walking......
"Even on flat terrain, a pro’s average speed needs to be tops in order to stay in the race. In fact. it’s usually about double that of an average rider.
Average Rider: 17-18 mph
Tour Pro: 25-28 mph"
Source:bicycling magazine. The only time my ebike speed average is higher is uphill and then I'm usually going less than 10mph. I can't see how I'd be twice as likely to be seriously injured in a fall off my ebike. Granted the ebike weighs more so there's a possible risk of more injury from the extra weight of the bike if it fell on top of me.. I ride about the same pace on my ebike as I do on a regular bike, I just go twice as far. Since I ride a class 1. My assist is about done at 17-18mph anyway. The surgeons math doesn't add up for me. How can he make such a statement? where did he get his data?
 
Last edited: