Electric Bike News - 2021 Ebike Supply Problem. You Do Not Want to Wait Any Longer To Buy An Ebike

Dex

Active Member
Region
USA
For anyone wondering why it's taking so long to receive they ebike specifically Lectric XP this video explains the situation for ebike companies.
(Not my video)


"Shopping for an Electric Bike? Prices are rising, wait times are getting longer, components won't be the same, and the shortage is going to get worse. We have a perfect storm creating a huge supply chain issue in the ebike industry that is creating extremely long production and delivery delays along with unavoidable price increases. With the weather becoming more ride friendly and people starting to get more comfortable going outdoors the demand for ebikes is growing at a pace the industry can't keep up with. Add in stimulus checks, less people wanting to take public transportation, and gas prices skyrocketing, the backlog for ebikes will not be going away anytime soon. My guess is that this problem will last until next spring and beyond. We are already seeing hard to get parts like brakes and tires being swapped out for different brands just to get a completed ebike out for sale. It's going to be interesting to see if the gap can be filled for parts that were mostly made by only a few brands like Shimano. Over the past few weeks, I've received multiple newsletters from most of the biggest direct to consumer brands like Aventon, Bolton Ebikes, and Juiced informing their email list subscribers that the ebike tariff exclusion has expired and they are now all being hit with the 25% import tariff increase. Hopefully the industry is lobbying loud enough to get the exclusion put back in place or the tariffs removed altogether."
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove
For anyone wondering why it's taking so long to receive they ebike specifically Lectric XP this video explains the situation for ebike companies.
(Not my video)


"Shopping for an Electric Bike? Prices are rising, wait times are getting longer, components won't be the same, and the shortage is going to get worse. We have a perfect storm creating a huge supply chain issue in the ebike industry that is creating extremely long production and delivery delays along with unavoidable price increases. With the weather becoming more ride friendly and people starting to get more comfortable going outdoors the demand for ebikes is growing at a pace the industry can't keep up with. Add in stimulus checks, less people wanting to take public transportation, and gas prices skyrocketing, the backlog for ebikes will not be going away anytime soon. My guess is that this problem will last until next spring and beyond. We are already seeing hard to get parts like brakes and tires being swapped out for different brands just to get a completed ebike out for sale. It's going to be interesting to see if the gap can be filled for parts that were mostly made by only a few brands like Shimano. Over the past few weeks, I've received multiple newsletters from most of the biggest direct to consumer brands like Aventon, Bolton Ebikes, and Juiced informing their email list subscribers that the ebike tariff exclusion has expired and they are now all being hit with the 25% import tariff increase. Hopefully the industry is lobbying loud enough to get the exclusion put back in place or the tariffs removed altogether."
Don't have a Lectric, but everybody is having issues so I'll reply to keep the thread going. There are several threads about supply issues already maybe this could be merged with one of the general ebike available threads ?
 
Region
USA
Anyone remember that scene in Airplane where she's telling the people they are 500,000 miles off course, have no guidance system.... no one cares. Then says "... and we are out of coffee" and everyone freaks out?

"Your coffee is about to get more expensive..."
 

penserv

Member
Region
Canada
City
Calgary, AB
My COVID project to keep my sanity this winter was to build an E-bike. I can attest to the scarcity of parts. I got the GMAC hub motor kit from Grin Technologies in Vancouver, but since they were in COVID lockdown, nobody answers the phone, so all help and fine tuning is by Email and that takes days. I got Magura MT5 brakes from my LBS, because that's all they had in hydraulics. A lot of stuff came from Amazon.ca only because they have the best delivery system, but you have to be very careful with their prices. I don't mind paying a little bit more with fast delivery but the Canadian version of Amazon can be skyhigh in pricing for no apparent reason. The brake rotors (220 mm for the rear wheel) had to come from Chain Reaction Cycle in the UK. My 42T front chainring gear came from bikeparts.de in Germany, because they were the only supplier in the world that had a 42T front gear at that time. Unbelievable. The head stem came from Denmark, but only because I got an N-lock for security and storage reasons. Oh, and a simple square taper 73 mm bottom bracket had to come from Bikeinn in the Netherlands, because nobody in North America had anything but a 68 mm bracket. A lot of the parts came from USA, but Amazon took care of that. Things like the heavy duty double kickstand and the fenders. The Brooks saddle I had on my road bike and it's perfectly formed to my butt (after a lot of soaking). I used Pinhead lock bolts to make sure it stays on the bike.

But I got everything and it all works, which was quite amazing, since I'd never built a bike before. I was thinking of buying one, which probably would have been cheaper, but in December, none were available that looked like they would be suitable for me. So, here's what I ended up with....
20210325_190133.jpg

And yes, the front suspension fork is an Amazon special Bolany, but it works for me 🤣
 

kmccune

Active Member
For anyone wondering why it's taking so long to receive they ebike specifically Lectric XP this video explains the situation for ebike companies.
(Not my video)


"Shopping for an Electric Bike? Prices are rising, wait times are getting longer, components won't be the same, and the shortage is going to get worse. We have a perfect storm creating a huge supply chain issue in the ebike industry that is creating extremely long production and delivery delays along with unavoidable price increases. With the weather becoming more ride friendly and people starting to get more comfortable going outdoors the demand for ebikes is growing at a pace the industry can't keep up with. Add in stimulus checks, less people wanting to take public transportation, and gas prices skyrocketing, the backlog for ebikes will not be going away anytime soon. My guess is that this problem will last until next spring and beyond. We are already seeing hard to get parts like brakes and tires being swapped out for different brands just to get a completed ebike out for sale. It's going to be interesting to see if the gap can be filled for parts that were mostly made by only a few brands like Shimano. Over the past few weeks, I've received multiple newsletters from most of the biggest direct to consumer brands like Aventon, Bolton Ebikes, and Juiced informing their email list subscribers that the ebike tariff exclusion has expired and they are now all being hit with the 25% import tariff increase. Hopefully the industry is lobbying loud enough to get the exclusion put back in place or the tariffs removed altogether."
Sorry won't happen under the current administration( what hath Trump wrought?) hey we need to pay for government. I really do not identify with either party,I wish the Libertarian party was viable( tariffs used to pay for government).
 

mclewis1

Member
Region
Canada
City
Fredericton, NB
My COVID project to keep my sanity this winter was to build an E-bike. ...
I followed almost exactly the same route. I started looking at ebike options early in 2020 and came to similar conclusions about the availability of suitable commercial versions ... so I went the DIY route.

I was going back and forth and almost waited until the spring of this year but last fall I found a Surly Bridge Club (in my size, local, and on sale ... go figure) and ordered a Grin RTR kit (everything was in stock, another shock). The only major difference in my case was I went a bit simpler with a little less power - Shengyi SX 500w front hub, integrated BaseRunner controller in a 52v/14amp/hr downtube battery. In looking at upgrades I'm into all the same issues you've listed ... isn't it fun having a bike right now with a 73mm BB?

For any DIY ebike having a starting point that's as standard or "normal" as possible is really valuable. In my case the BC was about 90% there (robust steel frame/fork, clearance for fenders/tires I wanted, standard dropout dimensions, etc.), and the only serious annoyance is the lack of chainstay clearance for larger chainrings.

The pic below is a quick one of the bike in it's winter configuration with the big studded Kahva winter tires. Now after a spring tune up (with summer tires) the wiring has been further tightened up so it's almost entirely unnoticed (well everywhere but at the handlebars). With a pannier on the back many folks seem to completely miss or don't understand the battery and I'm frequently asked if it really is an ebike 🙄
 

Attachments

  • ebike back end.JPG
    ebike back end.JPG
    407.2 KB · Views: 52

penserv

Member
Region
Canada
City
Calgary, AB
I've had to add two more international orders. The Ergon core saddle from the Netherlands and a Satori Animaris suspension seatpost from China, as I couldn't find stock in North America. The Ergon will replace my Brooks B17, which is not nearly as comfy on an E-MTB, where you sit all the time, as it was on a road bike, where you're standing up almost half the time.
 

kmccune

Active Member
I followed almost exactly the same route. I started looking at ebike options early in 2020 and came to similar conclusions about the availability of suitable commercial versions ... so I went the DIY route.

I was going back and forth and almost waited until the spring of this year but last fall I found a Surly Bridge Club (in my size, local, and on sale ... go figure) and ordered a Grin RTR kit (everything was in stock, another shock). The only major difference in my case was I went a bit simpler with a little less power - Shengyi SX 500w front hub, integrated BaseRunner controller in a 52v/14amp/hr downtube battery. In looking at upgrades I'm into all the same issues you've listed ... isn't it fun having a bike right now with a 73mm BB?

For any DIY ebike having a starting point that's as standard or "normal" as possible is really valuable. In my case the BC was about 90% there (robust steel frame/fork, clearance for fenders/tires I wanted, standard dropout dimensions, etc.), and the only serious annoyance is the lack of chainstay clearance for larger chainrings.

The pic below is a quick one of the bike in it's winter configuration with the big studded Kahva winter tires. Now after a spring tune up (with summer tires) the wiring has been further tightened up so it's almost entirely unnoticed (well everywhere but at the handlebars). With a pannier on the back many folks seem to completely miss or don't understand the battery and I'm frequently asked if it really is an ebike 🙄
I followed almost exactly the same route. I started looking at ebike options early in 2020 and came to similar conclusions about the availability of suitable commercial versions ... so I went the DIY route.

I was going back and forth and almost waited until the spring of this year but last fall I found a Surly Bridge Club (in my size, local, and on sale ... go figure) and ordered a Grin RTR kit (everything was in stock, another shock). The only major difference in my case was I went a bit simpler with a little less power - Shengyi SX 500w front hub, integrated BaseRunner controller in a 52v/14amp/hr downtube battery. In looking at upgrades I'm into all the same issues you've listed ... isn't it fun having a bike right now with a 73mm BB?

For any DIY ebike having a starting point that's as standard or "normal" as possible is really valuable. In my case the BC was about 90% there (robust steel frame/fork, clearance for fenders/tires I wanted, standard dropout dimensions, etc.), and the only serious annoyance is the lack of chainstay clearance for larger chainrings.

The pic below is a quick one of the bike in it's winter configuration with the big studded Kahva winter tires. Now after a spring tune up (with summer tires) the wiring has been further tightened up so it's almost entirely unnoticed (well everywhere but at the handlebars). With a pannier on the back many folks seem to completely miss or don't understand the battery and I'm frequently asked if it really is an ebike 🙄
Looks pretty good and having most of the stuff hidden really helps
 

AaronXander

New Member
Region
USA
This is a email update I got yesterday. I ordered my bike on March 16th 2021, and today is week 3 and they said would ship within 3 to 4 weeks which next week Tuesday the 13th would be the 4th week. Seems to me that I may end up getting my XP (not stand thru) by the end of the month..
 

Attachments

  • 066E4243-E179-4F84-BA5E-6AE1BA63F537.jpeg
    066E4243-E179-4F84-BA5E-6AE1BA63F537.jpeg
    409.7 KB · Views: 68

EMGX

Well-Known Member
I followed almost exactly the same route. I started looking at ebike options early in 2020 and came to similar conclusions about the availability of suitable commercial versions ... so I went the DIY route.

I was going back and forth and almost waited until the spring of this year but last fall I found a Surly Bridge Club (in my size, local, and on sale ... go figure) and ordered a Grin RTR kit (everything was in stock, another shock). The only major difference in my case was I went a bit simpler with a little less power - Shengyi SX 500w front hub, integrated BaseRunner controller in a 52v/14amp/hr downtube battery. In looking at upgrades I'm into all the same issues you've listed ... isn't it fun having a bike right now with a 73mm BB?

For any DIY ebike having a starting point that's as standard or "normal" as possible is really valuable. In my case the BC was about 90% there (robust steel frame/fork, clearance for fenders/tires I wanted, standard dropout dimensions, etc.), and the only serious annoyance is the lack of chainstay clearance for larger chainrings.

The pic below is a quick one of the bike in it's winter configuration with the big studded Kahva winter tires. Now after a spring tune up (with summer tires) the wiring has been further tightened up so it's almost entirely unnoticed (well everywhere but at the handlebars). With a pannier on the back many folks seem to completely miss or don't understand the battery and I'm frequently asked if it really is an ebike 🙄
Nice bike. With the front hub motor you have the advantage of keeping the stock drivetrain. Some people complain about what they feel is a unnatural sensation of a front hub motor pulling the bike, rather than pushing, but I don't notice that effect at all. I found that I just had to be more aware of traction issues on gravel when starting off if using assist.
 

Latitude

Well-Known Member
I was at my Trek dealer today picking up a derailleur hanger (busted mine while bending it back into line with the Park tool… think it had been weakened when I trashed the last derailleur) and also getting some brake pads for when needed (6500 km and counting on the original set). The tech guy said it was just as well I was getting the pads, as they have had sporadic supply of them. I said I understood parts were an ongoing issue, and he said bikes too. I looked at the shop and commented that there was a really good inventory there. Interestingly, he said they were getting mostly Ebikes and hadn’t been able to get a hybrid bike in quite a while… in fact one order was cancelled, I assume by Trek. There were lots of Ebikes there though.
 

kmccune

Active Member
Nice bike. With the front hub motor you have the advantage of keeping the stock drivetrain. Some people complain about what they feel is a unnatural sensation of a front hub motor pulling the bike, rather than pushing, but I don't notice that effect at all. I found that I just had to be more aware of traction issues on gravel when starting off if using assist.
Some People do not understand about shifting weight, When I pedal up a steep hill I can feel the weight being being transferred to the back wheel sometimes it almost feels like I am going to "wheelie" so I must train myself to lean forward a bit.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove
I was at my Trek dealer today picking up a derailleur hanger (busted mine while bending it back into line with the Park tool… think it had been weakened when I trashed the last derailleur) and also getting some brake pads for when needed (6500 km and counting on the original set). The tech guy said it was just as well I was getting the pads, as they have had sporadic supply of them. I said I understood parts were an ongoing issue, and he said bikes too. I looked at the shop and commented that there was a really good inventory there. Interestingly, he said they were getting mostly Ebikes and hadn’t been able to get a hybrid bike in quite a while… in fact one order was cancelled, I assume by Trek. There were lots of Ebikes there though.
Similar story from my LBS ... he has some Comos and Vados now, but is having trouble getting manual bikes and parts.
 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
The beauty of a scratch build is having better service parts availability than trying to find off brand or no name cheap replacements needed on the many budget eBikes sold. And often easier to repair than those spendy brands with proprietary parts.

Nice bike!