Electric bike specifications in Texas

bkauffman423

New Member
Region
USA
I'm wanting to get an ebike that stays within the legal limitations so I'm trying to make sense of the laws here in Texas. I'm used to riding supersport motorcycles so I'm not afraid of getting one that's too powerful, especially when looking at the restrictions in Texas. As far as I can tell, class 3 (20mph under throttle only, 28mph motor + pedaling) is permitted but Texas seems to have an additional restriction to now allow more than a 750 watt motor. So while something like the Juiced Hyperscrambler 2 is appealing, its 1000w motor disqualifies it from classification as an electric bicycle in Texas even though its controller can limit the bike to class 3 speeds. That has me looking at its little brother the Juiced Scambler which has a 750 watt motor and class 3, which seems to be the legal limit here. But then I found the Ariel Rider D-Class which has dual 750w motors (front and rear wheel) and class 3. I would appreciate the added acceleration so my question is whether the Ariel Rider D-Class is legal as an electric bicycle in Texas. It doesn't have a motor bigger than 750 watts but at the same time it has two motors, totaling 1500 watts. I'm wanting to get this for a bit of fun around town within the constraints of the law and I'm not trying to modify it to breach those limits or get some crazy 8000w build. Any input would be appreciated. Thanks!
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
I'm wanting to get an ebike that stays within the legal limitations so I'm trying to make sense of the laws here in Texas. I'm used to riding supersport motorcycles so I'm not afraid of getting one that's too powerful, especially when looking at the restrictions in Texas. As far as I can tell, class 3 (20mph under throttle only, 28mph motor + pedaling) is permitted but Texas seems to have an additional restriction to now allow more than a 750 watt motor. So while something like the Juiced Hyperscrambler 2 is appealing, its 1000w motor disqualifies it from classification as an electric bicycle in Texas even though its controller can limit the bike to class 3 speeds. That has me looking at its little brother the Juiced Scambler which has a 750 watt motor and class 3, which seems to be the legal limit here. But then I found the Ariel Rider D-Class which has dual 750w motors (front and rear wheel) and class 3. I would appreciate the added acceleration so my question is whether the Ariel Rider D-Class is legal as an electric bicycle in Texas. It doesn't have a motor bigger than 750 watts but at the same time it has two motors, totaling 1500 watts. I'm wanting to get this for a bit of fun around town within the constraints of the law and I'm not trying to modify it to breach those limits or get some crazy 8000w build. Any input would be appreciated. Thanks!
Texas has the 3 class law. No matter what some sellers will tell you, a Class 3 ebike cannot have a throttle in any way, and the maximum watts is 750. In addition Class 3 bikes are not allowed on public off road paths and trails. Many off road venues only allow class 1 ebikes. Class 1 and 3 are identical except the top speed for C3 is 28 mph and requires a speedometer.

People for Bikes is the lobby arm of the bike and ebike industry, they wrote the 3 Class law and they are the ones getting this passed in state legislatures, including Texas.


Class 1 electric bicycleA bicycle equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling, and that ceases to provide assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 20 miles per hour.
Class 2 electric bicycleA bicycle equipped with a motor that may be used exclusively to propel the bicycle, and that is not capable of providing assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 20 miles per hour.
Class 3 electric bicycleA bicycle equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling, and that ceases to provide assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 28 miles per hour and is equipped with a speedometer.
 

bkauffman423

New Member
Region
USA
Thanks for the info, JR. I'd read the descriptions of the classes many times and assumed that Class 3 would be inclusive of the Class 2 throttle-only limits. I'm glad that you're pointed out that distinction so I know what to watch for. I prefer higher speeds and rather enjoy pedaling so I think class 3 is the way to go for me but I may give more preference to a torque sensing setup now that you've pointed out that class 3 would not include a throttle. I'm still not 100% sure if a bike with dual (front and rear) 750W would be permitted in Texas but I think I'll be going with a single 750 class 3 to be on the safe side since these bike laws are being updated regularly.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the info, JR. I'd read the descriptions of the classes many times and assumed that Class 3 would be inclusive of the Class 2 throttle-only limits. I'm glad that you're pointed out that distinction so I know what to watch for. I prefer higher speeds and rather enjoy pedaling so I think class 3 is the way to go for me but I may give more preference to a torque sensing setup now that you've pointed out that class 3 would not include a throttle. I'm still not 100% sure if a bike with dual (front and rear) 750W would be permitted in Texas but I think I'll be going with a single 750 class 3 to be on the safe side since these bike laws are being updated regularly.
I think a good torque sensing system works well off the line. The regulation trend seems to be moving away from throttle. Regulators don't really understand how weak most ebike throttles are, they just think moped or motorcycle when they hear throttle. I've been involved with regulators in opening up trails to ebikes and none of them want to discuss throttle acceptance.

That said one of my ebikes has a throttle, I'll ride it on road and dirt roads in my area where it's legal. And I see Class 2 ebikes on trails. To be fair I haven't witnessed any problems and I don't discourage people getting what they want. There's been some enforcement across the country here and there. I think it'll get more strict as time goes on... it always does. Most places if you're caught riding an illegal vehicle on a path or trail the charge is trespassing. My county that's an $800 fine. That's what the threat was here before we got them accepted. Some jurisdictions will confiscate the bike.

Best of luck in your search!
 

Cheetah66

New Member
Region
USA
City
San Antonio
I'm wanting to get an ebike that stays within the legal limitations so I'm trying to make sense of the laws here in Texas. I'm used to riding supersport motorcycles so I'm not afraid of getting one that's too powerful, especially when looking at the restrictions in Texas. As far as I can tell, class 3 (20mph under throttle only, 28mph motor + pedaling) is permitted but Texas seems to have an additional restriction to now allow more than a 750 watt motor. So while something like the Juiced Hyperscrambler 2 is appealing, its 1000w motor disqualifies it from classification as an electric bicycle in Texas even though its controller can limit the bike to class 3 speeds. That has me looking at its little brother the Juiced Scambler which has a 750 watt motor and class 3, which seems to be the legal limit here. But then I found the Ariel Rider D-Class which has dual 750w motors (front and rear wheel) and class 3. I would appreciate the added acceleration so my question is whether the Ariel Rider D-Class is legal as an electric bicycle in Texas. It doesn't have a motor bigger than 750 watts but at the same time it has two motors, totaling 1500 watts. I'm wanting to get this for a bit of fun around town within the constraints of the law and I'm not trying to modify it to breach those limits or get some crazy 8000w build. Any input would be appreciated. Thanks!
I ride most day here in San Antonio TX with my girlfriend weather permitting,
only issue I had when I first got my Cheetah which is 750w, was from road racer telling me they are illegal because some of these ridder's don't like Electric Bikes passing them by when this does happen and you'll get those who say electric bikes are not exercising which is ridiculous.
There is a shop in Canyon Lake outside of San Antonio TX which makes battery upgrades and increase power on electric bikes along with maintaining them.
I use a mobile repair guy for my bike..
Good luck in your purchase ..
Cheers
Clay
 

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