eMTB Options For 2020

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Excellent!
Yeah, the bikes are a blast.

If you continue to have back pain see if you can find a physical therapist or DC that practices FASCIA MANIPULATION. I've had about 8 back and neck injuries so my back is like popcorn. Regular doc says I have chronic arthritis and I have had on and off severe pain as well as ongoing dull pain. I got a referral to a guy here locally and after three visits he fixed it! I've been the most pain free in the past dozen or more years.

Levo Comp is an awesome bike. Have you ridden the Giants? Can you compare them?

My wife isn't interested in dirt, but she loves pavement and bike trails. We are having a blast! I'm still trying to decide if and when I could actually get out for mountain biking. I sure enjoy learning about what's out there - the technology is just amazing.
I am in the same boat regarding back pain... tell us more about the Fascia Manipulation. Thanks!

Here is another mountain bike to consider if you want a nicely spec'ed Shimano E8000 system under $3.5K




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Browneye

Well-Known Member
Thanks guys, much appreciated.
The Motobecane looks nice.

I've been Watching Rob's channel on youtube - good commentary. And he really rides!
I'll check out the other forum as well. Another one I found was a regular mtb forum with one section of e-bikes - looked like culture wars over there with all the arguing. 🤣

Something worth checking out if you like extreme sports and raw talent - CHIVETV has a RedBull adjunct channel that is all extreme sports. Lots of mtb footage, just fantastic. 👍
 

Browneye

Well-Known Member
On physical therapy with 'fascia manipulation', here's the official site on the 'Stecco' method: http://www.fascialmanipulation.com/en/

If you experience ongoing muscle, skeletal, and joint pain, search for a trained and qualified therapist in your locale. The young doctor I found spent nearly 4 years interning and was beyond thorough. He found areas of pain I had that I didn't tell him about, and some I didn't even know I had. It hurts like hell because they manually break down 'densification' or hard spots in muscle tissue, but the result is an astounding relief of pain.

Basically your muscles get hardened areas of tissue damage from injuries, your body deposits lactic acid there causing the densification. When you're young with good muscle elasticity there's generally enough that the hard spots go unnoticed. But as you age and your elasticity begins to reduce and then the muscles pull on your nerves causing inflammation and pain and neuropathy.

My doctor is also a chiropractor and I'm well familiar with that as I've had whiplash, back sprain, herniated discs, and chronic arthritis. After 55 you're not even supposed to take aspirin or ibuprofen for the risk of liver and kidney damage. So while chiropractic manipulation can provide relief, unless you deal with the underlying cause, the associated muscle tissue pulls the bones back out of alignment. So he'll manipulate if you ask, but he gets much better results for his patients with this Stecco method.

About the middle of July last year I could hardly walk, had been in chronic pain for 8 weeks. Usually these episodes would subside after a few days, or a week, but not the last time. After three weekly visits I was pain free. I would have given him my entire life savings for the relief I got. I was astounded. The pain caused me to sell off my last motorcycle and quit the sport after fifty years of riding. It was heartbreaking. Getting into the ebike thing was like a new frontier for us.

Wife has had occasional migraines and persistent neck pain, mostly just from aging, and from her job as a recruiter that requires so much phone time. She had one session, and he worked all kinds of muscle tissue around her neck and head. She said it hurt like hell and she didn't think it did anything but hurt, but she hasn't had a migraine since - about 5 months ago now.

We have sent a half dozen people in on referral and they all are huge fans of it now, beyond grateful. Some were chronic sufferers, getting more relief than ever before. It's well worth checking out.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
On physical therapy with 'fascia manipulation', here's the official site on the 'Stecco' method: http://www.fascialmanipulation.com/en/

If you experience ongoing muscle, skeletal, and joint pain, search for a trained and qualified therapist in your locale. The young doctor I found spent nearly 4 years interning and was beyond thorough. He found areas of pain I had that I didn't tell him about, and some I didn't even know I had. It hurts like hell because they manually break down 'densification' or hard spots in muscle tissue, but the result is an astounding relief of pain.

Basically your muscles get hardened areas of tissue damage from injuries, your body deposits lactic acid there causing the densification. When you're young with good muscle elasticity there's generally enough that the hard spots go unnoticed. But as you age and your elasticity begins to reduce and then the muscles pull on your nerves causing inflammation and pain and neuropathy.

My doctor is also a chiropractor and I'm well familiar with that as I've had whiplash, back sprain, herniated discs, and chronic arthritis. After 55 you're not even supposed to take aspirin or ibuprofen for the risk of liver and kidney damage. So while chiropractic manipulation can provide relief, unless you deal with the underlying cause, the associated muscle tissue pulls the bones back out of alignment. So he'll manipulate if you ask, but he gets much better results for his patients with this Stecco method.

About the middle of July last year I could hardly walk, had been in chronic pain for 8 weeks. Usually these episodes would subside after a few days, or a week, but not the last time. After three weekly visits I was pain free. I would have given him my entire life savings for the relief I got. I was astounded. The pain caused me to sell off my last motorcycle and quit the sport after fifty years of riding. It was heartbreaking. Getting into the ebike thing was like a new frontier for us.

Wife has had occasional migraines and persistent neck pain, mostly just from aging, and from her job as a recruiter that requires so much phone time. She had one session, and he worked all kinds of muscle tissue around her neck and head. She said it hurt like hell and she didn't think it did anything but hurt, but she hasn't had a migraine since - about 5 months ago now.

We have sent a half dozen people in on referral and they all are huge fans of it now, beyond grateful. Some were chronic sufferers, getting more relief than ever before. It's well worth checking out.

Browneye, thanks for sharing... I am going to check it out locally. How often do you need to go for treatments?
 

Browneye

Well-Known Member
I went the three times and have not been back. He explained that it’s not like chiropractic where you go back again and again, so it doesn’t provide the same revenue stream. So he relies on referrals for new patients.
Obviously if pain returns...well, he’s on speed dial. 😊
 

Browneye

Well-Known Member
YT Industries Report

Yesterday we made the trip down to San Clemente CA - a 'beach-city' between Anaheim and San Diego. It was sunny and mild on a Saturday in February.

YT has a 'Mill Store' in the lobby of their building, with apparel and accessories, a beautiful lounge area with big-screen and even beer on tap, plus an outdoor picnic area with seating, shade umbrellas, and a firepit. Upstairs is a large showroom with all of their mountain bikes on display.

They offer an appointment scheduling process with variety of their bikes in various frame-sizes to go out for an hour or two to test them out. This way you're not stuck waiting, or worse can't get to try the one you're interested in because other customers are riding them.
Two blocks away is a CA State Park with scads of - you guessed it - mountain biking trails. What a hoot!

This company obviously caters specifically to the mountain biking enthusiast, the bulk of their business and clientele are non-electric riders. The place was busy with lots of young men and women, owners, new bike-test customers, and everybody was there with a cult-like enthusiasm. It was truly amazing to see. The customer service people were knowledgeable, polite, helpful, it's the way I would build a business myself.

Out of their quite broad range of mountain bikes is their eMTB version they call the DECOY. There are four models, 2 styles, a 'twenty-niner' in base and pro level of compentry, and their claim to fame the 'mullet' bike with 29" front and 27.5" rear configurations, in comp and pro level. They are all built on the same carbon fiber frame in four or five sizes, with Shimano Steps E8000 mid-drive assist.

I was primarily interested in their BASE 29 that sells for $4399. The Pro 29 sells for about a thousand more, has Fox suspension verses Rockshox on the Base, as well as a step up in gear selector, brakes, and a few other details, like carbon fiber rear triangle verses the base alloy one. The pro version is a little more customizable, and they had a size large to demo so that's what I chose for an hour of trail riding.





Now that I think of it I don't believe I've ever actually ridden a full suspension mountain bike on a trail, so this was rather a new experience for me. Drawing on my dirtbike experience I had no problem getting up and down the trails. The center of gravity is a little higher with a bicycle, and you don't have throttle to point and shoot or roost a corner, so it took some getting used to. First just keeping it on the trail, and then shifting and pedaling, adjusting the dropper seat for up and down terrain. In several places on these trails are narrow wood-slat bridges that cross a ravine. They're only about foot and a half wide and were very unnerving at first. You just roll through them but if you happened to miss you would crash head-long into a ditch. The thought of landing on my head made me a bit nervous at first, but I soon found confidence and was blasting down the trails. A couple of sections were so steep you couldn't stop, so you just have to trust the bike and go for it.

The geometry of the Decoy lends to very high stability - traction is amazing. The bike is not 'twitchy', and you have to throw your weight around and lean it into corners. Traction is fantastic, I never even slipped, well maybe just a tad braking downhill to slow my decent. But you just finger the brakes and stand up, drop the seat, and lean back, and there's never that feeling you're going to go over the bars. Handling is predictable, and by about half way through my ride I was able to keep the bike in the middle of the trail. At first I was over or under-shooting corners and stalling out. Same for a g-out down and up, you have to be ready to pedal as soon as you hit the bottom and start up the next slope, choosing the proper gear ahead of time. Shifting was seamless.

The Shimano drive responds instantly, it's powerful, and quiet. There are 3 assist levels, eco- trail - and boost. I mostly rode in boost, dropping to trail for flatter sections. It was easy to start from a stop on an uphill section of trail - just point it where you want to go, hit an up-pedal and it would take right off. Very confidence inspiring. The Shimano E7000 display is easy to read and control, and it's tucked in behind the handlebar right next to the stem, protected and out of the way.

I never even thought about the suspension - it soaks up all the ruts and bumps, is very comfortable and confidence inspiring as well.

After my ride my sales guy explained all the model differences and features of the bike. We checked the battery range - I had ridden about 5 miles and the range indicator was 26 - so I could figure about 30 miles of range at the pace and terrain I had just experienced. I was about 70% spent, so I got the feeling it would be plenty for a day out on the trail. These bikes have a 500+ watt battery pack very nicely integrated into the front downtube channel, with all of the control cables tucked inside this channel. This lends to easy maintenance and a very clean look and feel.

Overall, the experience left me with the feeling that the bike was an amazing tool that would take you hurdling down a narrow dirt trail with ease. It is the closest thing I've ever experienced to a dirtbike. Reminded me of my early days as a teenager, riding single-track trails on my motorcycle.

The fit and finish on these bikes is something to behold. They exude quality, are a work of art, and have all the best stuff the industry has to offer. And a great company backing them up. No wonder they are so popular - they sell every bike they make.











I asked if they ever have a sale, my sales guy said sometimes once or twice a year, like black-Friday after the end of the season, and maybe one model that they have a surplus of. Might not even be the ebike DECOY, so if you want one you pony up for it. They come with cheap plastic pedals, so they offer Crank-Bros alloy pedals for $100 when you buy the bike.

The frame configuration negates a place to install a full bike-bottle cage, so they offer a half-liter unit that fits under the front shock mount. For me I would likely wear a hydration pack anyway, like we've done for years. That way you can carry tools and lunch, emergency gear, and a couple of liters of icewater with a bite-valve.

I left with a feeling that this was a no-brainer choice. The only reservation I had is how much I could or would actually use one - stealing the chance to get out, and that there are other slightly lessor options for nearly half the price. So I didn't buy one yesterday, but it surely is enticing. No wonder there are so many fans for the brand.

Happy Trails!!



The customer lounge at YT - even beer on tap for when you get back from 'shredding'. :cool:



And their showroom...

 
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FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Great review on the YT... thanks for sharing. The bike frame design looks super clean with a well-integrated battery and motor.
Sounds like this might be the right bike for you... I would ask them to call you if they have a demo model to sell at a discount. ;)


A 9 out of 10 in-depth review...

 
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Browneye

Well-Known Member
About the same as my Yamaha. Just a mild whirring noise you can hear when it runs. In fact, it's easy to hear when it kicks in, and you can feel it, especially when it's in boost mode. It does sound very smooth running though, more like a whoosh. Surely not unpleasant, you don't really notice it, and after while you ignore it so if something odd starts making noise you notice it.

The faster you pedal the more it assists. I've heard these motors require high cadence to get the most out of them, which is slightly different than what Brose or Yamaha does, they have more assist at lower cadence. At least that's my perception. This may well be where I part with a lot of riders, and Sam told me about that too - Yamaha is one of the best for higher torque at lower cadence and pedal pressure. Some don't like it, the stronger ones, cuz they like to pedal fast. But for a old guy it makes good sense. I really need to try the Trance now. I really wish we could ride these things side by side on a trail - then you can really tell what you're getting. Being my first ride I don't have anything to compare to, just the other bikes I've tried out on pavement.

On the way back to the shop I had a pretty good grade for about a half mile up the road, and I was pretty pooped, so at full boost just loafing in 5th or so it pulled it at about 10-12mph, virtually effortlessly. The tires seem really obnoxious on pavement. But it's fairly easy to ride.

I could see having a road-wheel set if it was your only bike. You could change them out, lock out the rear shock, and you could ride it on pavement pretty easily. It hits the 20mph speed limit without much trouble. I'm pretty okay with class 1 speeds.

The 1x11 or 12 gearing, or whatever it is, provides really wide gearing - from crawling for climbing, to over 20mph. And shifts like butter, although I did notice the trigger up-shifter was a little hard to reach, and was a little stiff. Potentially could be adjusted. And the rear brake lever I would have liked setup better for one-finger braking. As it was it got too close to my other fingers on hard braking, so 2 fingers was better. For downhilling, one finger is no problem, the worked really well. The grind a bit, probly as loud as the motor. LOL

EDIT: Shimano slx 12spd shadow plus, the pro has xt.
 
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Browneye

Well-Known Member
Great review on the YT... thanks for sharing. The bike frame design looks super clean with a well-integrated battery and motor.
Sounds like this might be the right bike for you... I would ask them to call you if they have a demo model to sell at a discount. ;)


A 9 out of 10 in-depth review...

Cool vid huh? He kind of rambles on, and the poor guy doesn't understand shipping, but I liked how hardcore he is and how he talked about bike sizing, and the good and bad. He went on a 'angry ride'. 🤣

I talked with the sales guy about these models too, and sizing, and that's how I confirmed the size L for me. Generally I'm recommended a medium for others brands, and my Giant is a M, but the bike I tried fit really well, I was well happy with the ergos, although I would probably put a stem riser on it just for my old-man back.

We talked about the regular decoy vs the 29 - the 27.5 rear is wider and really grips for braking downhill. It also makes the bike a little more flickable, and the 29 front rolls over obstacles better. It has a little more suspension than the 29 so that's likely the bulk of the cost difference between the two. The 29'r is more stable, and it is slightly faster, there is value in the larger rear too, especially for flatter terrain, more general riding than just downhill. Evidently you can feel the difference with the smaller rear wheel. It gets down to personal preference, and I knew right away I liked the 29 better. It also had the yari forks, and the alloy rear triangle, and it's $600 less than the regular Decoy, so it was kind of a no-brainer. If I was his age I would probably be going for the regular Decoy as well.

I'm tellin' ya, these fanboyz for this brand are gaga for them. They just love them.

Oh yeah, and I don't need nor want to pay for carbon fiber wheels. LOL

I found the seat to be okay, you only sit on it when pedaling - downhill you're standing up. I did experience pedal strike several times - my sales guy said that's common, it's about timing, you develop skill to not do it. The crankarms are 165's to shorten them up a bit.

I also noticed the shock was a little soft. I don't know if you can pre-load it more or what. I thought they were air shock so you could just put a little more air in them. And I was riding the fox shock he was wanting to buy, so I dunno. Some of this stuff you kind of just have to get used to.

He rides WAY faster than I did. The reality that I could get out on a maiden run successfully speaks well for the bike in general. 👍

BTW, on paint finish...this year they are all high gloss. Last year they had the matt finish and found just riding the bike would polish the top tube by your pants, and that they were difficult to clean. The high gloss is so much easier to keep looking good so they phased out the matt finish.

The Base 29 comes in blue or black, and they have stock in pretty much all sizes. The regular decoy is backordered 'till April, in all sizes and colors.

Perhaps it would be worth trying out the regular Decoy if I actually buy one of their bikes. It's a lot of money and you better get it right. 👍
 
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Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
And the rear brake lever I would have liked setup better for one-finger braking.
Chris, this kind of brakes is fully adjustable. If the person selling the bike can really understand bike-fitting, they should be able to adjust the brake levers so you could do one-finger braking as any technical rider does. Also, once you have determined the proper frame size, the bike-fitter should fit the bike for you. Starting with the saddle height, saddle position (front-back), setting up the shocks, handlebar etc. Bike sizing and bike-fitting are two different things!

You want to raise the stem. Sure about it? On steep climbing, you should lean forward; won't the risen steam spoil the geometry? Aha, the CrankBrothers Stamp platform pedals are very very good.

So, are you going for YT Decoy? I'm jealous!
 

PDoz

Well-Known Member
Chris, am I reading this correctly - the yt is the first time you've ridden an emtb on real mtb trails? If so, do yourself a favour and ride a few more bikes before spending.

I'm getting the vibe you value reliability over bling? Do you really want a fragile carbon frame , or can you trade a bit of weight and have an alloy frame with lifetime warranty ( giant)

I'm hearing you saying the noise doesn't matter, but these motors definitely have different characters and once you get over the " holy cow this is fun "factor , the sound really does matter. Shimano whines , giant growls down low then whines at higher cadence - I've come to enjoy the aural feedback from my pwx and fear I'll miss it when it gets upgraded to the quieter 2020 motor next week. Did I mention giant warranty? Despite what your lbs claims, yamaha motors DO occasionally fail when used for hard core mtb purposes. My torque sensors are playing up - giant are replacing and upgrading my 2 year old motor. Did I mention 2020 and 2019 pwx motors are different? For 2020 you get angle sensors so the option of an auto mode, higher cadence support and less noise - so you may be able to negotiate a discount on a 2019 giant, but they are not the same bike

Reading between the lines, it sounds like you intend to hit dirt bike single line on your emtb? That's a very different ask compared to riding groomed mtb trails. IMHO , The giant trance and trek bikes cope best on motorbike trails - they're better climbers at the expense of not being as nimble - a really big consuderation if you're riding chewed out rocky dirt bike tracks. For perspective, I live in enduro motorbike heaven - hundreds of km of rocky single line on my doorstep, but almost all the locals have stopped riding these trails on our ktm's - trek and giant are taking over. We also have spectacular formed mtb trails nearby - that's specialized / norco country. The long low raked out short chain-stays brigade are fine on groomed trails, but the tough old alloy framed wheelbarrow trek / giants rule the ruts.

ps - one for your memory lane - with an emtb I don't need a dedicated enduro motorbike , so I run an swm rs650 ( look closer, it's a brand new te630) That road rubber comes iff after it's run in.
 

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Browneye

Well-Known Member
Chris, this kind of brakes is fully adjustable. If the person selling the bike can really understand bike-fitting, they should be able to adjust the brake levers so you could do one-finger braking as any technical rider does. Also, once you have determined the proper frame size, the bike-fitter should fit the bike for you. Starting with the saddle height, saddle position (front-back), setting up the shocks, handlebar etc. Bike sizing and bike-fitting are two different things!

You want to raise the stem. Sure about it? On steep climbing, you should lean forward; won't the risen steam spoil the geometry? Aha, the CrankBrothers Stamp platform pedals are very very good.

So, are you going for YT Decoy? I'm jealous!
Yes, surely once purchased personalized setup would be in order. I was simply commenting on things I noticed that I would address on my own bike.
For a test ride they set suspension for your weight, attach pedals of your choosing - flats or clips, and send you out.

As far as frame size, I've sat on and ridden both medium and large frames and I can do with either. But I prefer the little extra room in the 'cockpit' of a larger frame bike. No issue with stand-over on either.

I only comment on the stem because the standard position is more leaned over than I prefer. But surely with some time on one I might come to realize it works better...or not. These are all learned with experience for sure.

I am not committed yet. I like the bike and the company as it presents itself, but there are other considerations, like the next comment below... ;)


Chris, am I reading this correctly - the yt is the first time you've ridden an emtb on real mtb trails? If so, do yourself a favour and ride a few more bikes before spending.

I'm getting the vibe you value reliability over bling? Do you really want a fragile carbon frame , or can you trade a bit of weight and have an alloy frame with lifetime warranty ( giant)

I'm hearing you saying the noise doesn't matter, but these motors definitely have different characters and once you get over the " holy cow this is fun "factor , the sound really does matter. Shimano whines , giant growls down low then whines at higher cadence - I've come to enjoy the aural feedback from my pwx and fear I'll miss it when it gets upgraded to the quieter 2020 motor next week. Did I mention giant warranty? Despite what your lbs claims, yamaha motors DO occasionally fail when used for hard core mtb purposes. My torque sensors are playing up - giant are replacing and upgrading my 2 year old motor. Did I mention 2020 and 2019 pwx motors are different? For 2020 you get angle sensors so the option of an auto mode, higher cadence support and less noise - so you may be able to negotiate a discount on a 2019 giant, but they are not the same bike

Reading between the lines, it sounds like you intend to hit dirt bike single line on your emtb? That's a very different ask compared to riding groomed mtb trails. IMHO , The giant trance and trek bikes cope best on motorbike trails - they're better climbers at the expense of not being as nimble - a really big consuderation if you're riding chewed out rocky dirt bike tracks. For perspective, I live in enduro motorbike heaven - hundreds of km of rocky single line on my doorstep, but almost all the locals have stopped riding these trails on our ktm's - trek and giant are taking over. We also have spectacular formed mtb trails nearby - that's specialized / norco country. The long low raked out short chain-stays brigade are fine on groomed trails, but the tough old alloy framed wheelbarrow trek / giants rule the ruts.

ps - one for your memory lane - with an emtb I don't need a dedicated enduro motorbike , so I run an swm rs650 ( look closer, it's a brand new te630) That road rubber comes iff after it's run in.
Ah, another dirtbiker going eMTB...WHOOT! :p
So cool that the Husqvarna factory in Italy was reopened building the same bikes under SWM. IMOH that TE630 was the best dualsport ever made. I put about 9000 miles on mine, 90% dirt. A couple of trips to Grand Canyon north rim, Zion, the entire state of California. It even saw some singletrack, but man what a handful. I sold it to a fellow in Portland OR after I hurt my shoulder on it.

My previous bike was a KTM 250xcfw - with the RFS motor. It was fantastic, but I couldn't get it plated and with so many riding areas closed down it became a necessity.
Before that I had a GasGas EC250 2-stroke, and it was plated. I should never have sold that bike! Rode that one all over the Sierra mountains, even raced it in Baja.

The dirtbikes were going to kill me. The road bikes, I put about a hundred thousand on them over my lifetime and never dropped one - not even a parking lot tip over. I was always afraid of getting knocked off by one driver and another running me over. In the end I considered my lucky-stars, better quit while I'm ahead. The likely result of a road crash is death or dismemberment. I have several disabled old riding buddies. :rolleyes:

What area do you live/ride? That's really interesting about the locals trading their dirtbikes for mountain bikes. But I'm hearing/seeing that more and more. 👍

You've nailed it - I really do need to try a few more. My Giant dealer has a Trance to lend out, I will likely take him up on that.

I have been skeptical about a carbon fiber frame from the get-go, not wishing to pay for one either. But I've been told they are solid and well established now by several people, so I've become more accepting. In fact, I asked my YT sales guy about it - what difference would I notice in riding a CF or a alloy frame, and his reply was that based on my intended use, age, experience, and etc. probably nothing. I'm not a competitor, and I'm not going to be flying through the air on one. LOL

I really like the Giant Trance, either iteration. I like my PW motor in my Giant, it's just excellent. I need to decide which version, the 1 or the 3, and try and make a deal. One local shop is having a spring sale and discounting nearly 20% on new 2020 models - they have both in stock, a E+1 large, and a E+3 medium. I'm leaning toward the former - it's right about five thousand out the door. Full dealer support locally makes solid sense for a mountain bike - you beat the crap out of them! LOL. My Explore has been just fantastic, so I feel like I know what I'm getting.

For just a few hundred more than the YT I can get a 2019 Turbo Levo Comp, just a bit more than the Trance E+1. I guess I need to test-ride both now.

I'm still reluctant to drop that kind of money for a bicycle. My Husky was $6500 in 2011, and it was 52hp!! ;)

Advice and comment appreciated!
 

Browneye

Well-Known Member
I posted this vid elsewhere, but it should be part of this thread as well.
I like how Rob does his reveiws - seems like a great resource...

 

Browneye

Well-Known Member
Okay guys, tell me why I shouldn't buy one of these...
Lenny's has a size large for $2500. Not sure if that includes shipping or not. If not they charge $200. No tax.

And I'm still seriuosly considering the BH Rebel Lynx 5.5 they have, it's a size medium, the last one left with PW-X. It is a 2018 model however.

2019 HAIBIKE XDURO ALL MOUNTAIN 2.0



 
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LimboJim

Well-Known Member
Okay guys, tell me why I shouldn't buy one of these...
Lenny's has a size large for $2500. Not sure if that includes shipping or not. If not they charge $200. No tax.

And I'm still seriuosly considering the BH Rebel Lynx 5.5 they have, it's a size medium, the last one left with PW-X. It is a 2018 model however.

2019 HAIBIKE XDURO ALL MOUNTAIN 2.0



$2500 was Haibike's direct to consumer price on Black Friday, including shipping. I still wish I'd jumped on one, but I already have a few quality eMTBS. None with PW-X though...

I think I said it in your other thread, but dollar for dollar the Haibike's a much better value IMO.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Okay guys, tell me why I shouldn't buy one of these...
Lenny's has a size large for $2500. Not sure if that includes shipping or not. If not they charge $200. No tax.

And I'm still seriuosly considering the BH Rebel Lynx 5.5 they have, it's a size medium, the last one left with PW-X. It is a 2018 model however.

2019 HAIBIKE XDURO ALL MOUNTAIN 2.0

Both bikes are a great value... the BH has a bit higher spec components, XT groupset, SLX brakes, and Fox shocks.

It really comes down to your personal preference... you can't go wrong with either one at this price. $2,500 vs. $2,480.

I looked at both and decided to go with the BH 5.5, so I may have a bit of confirmation bias regarding this comparison. ;)

Haibike XDURO ALLMTN 2.0 Review
  • An entry-point all-mountain model from Haibike, features full suspension with 160mm of travel in the front, 150mm in the rear, available in four frame sizes for improved fit and utilizing Maxxis Minion DHR II plus-sized tires that are known for durability
  • Utilizing the top of the line Yamaha PW-X motor, this is a mid-drive with 80nm of torque, 120rpm pedal support, and 20mph top speed, this is one of the more reliable motors out there, paired with a 36v 13.6ah battery and Yamaha’s new minimalist Side Switch display for quick and easy readouts
  • Mechanically, the bike features a Shimano Deore derailleur with a Shadow + clutch for easy maintenance, also has a double chain ring in the front with 44 and 32 teeth, this combined with the 11-32 tooth cassette makes for 20 speeds total on the bike, massive 203mm front hydraulic brake rotor and 180mm in the rear
  • Charging is faster than average with a four amp system, but the charger is larger and heavier than most... the plug port is low on the frame, positioned on the non-driveside (where you normally lay a bike down), but the frame does have provisions to add a kickstand, no bottle cage bosses and external battery design is a bit outdated
.
Easy Motion Rebel Lynx 5.5 27.5 + PW-X Review
  • A full suspension electric trail bike with 140mm air shocks by Fox, split pivot rear design isolates pedal and braking power from terrain response, available in two frame sizes
  • Beautiful aesthetic, matte black and gloss black paint throughout, blacked-out anodized stanchions, internally routed cables with large grommets for easy maintenance, infinite-set dropper post
  • Wider boost hub spacing with 15mm front and 12 mm rear thru-axles provides wheel strength, larger plus sized 27.5"x2.8" Schwalbe Nobby Nic tires offer traction, float, and comfort, powerful Shimano SLX hydraulic disc brakes 203mm/180mm
  • Rugged Yamaha display panel with Micro-USB charging port and color LED readouts, high-capacity 500 watt-hour battery, fast 4 amp charger, powerful PW-X mid-drive motor with 80nm of torque and 120 RPM pedal support
 
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