Energypak Plus range extender for 2020 bikes

jabberwocky

Well-Known Member
I posted some info in the Revolt thread, but since info on this thing is pretty sparse online, I thought maybe a dedicated thread would be helpful.

I got my Energypak Plus a few weeks ago, and finally got the firmware updated so I could use it. First ride was yesterday.

Prior to getting it, the info I could find online said the bike would run the main battery down, then switch to the extender. After using it, thats not how it works. The bike seems to pull from both of them while riding, and the battery percentage is based on the combined total. I finished with 31% remaining (for both), and after removing the extender it said the main had 14% left. So over the ride it pulled 424whr from both, ~323whr (of 375) out of the main and 101 (of 240) from the extender. I'll keep track of use on future rides to try and understand the logic. I'm pleased it pulls from both while riding though; if nothing else, its better for battery health to not run them totally down.

I will comment that the battery percentage while riding did seem to go down in steps. Like, it would deplete linearly for a bit, then hold a percentage for a bit, then deplete some more. Overall was as expected. My weight (220lb) and riding style (almost entirely eco, 100% assist) and terrain (hilly, primarily unpaved) I consume a pretty consistent 11.5-12whr per mile. I expected main+extender range to be 50-52ish miles, and consumption was extremely close to that.

The plus does have a USB port (on the bottom close the cable), so you could use it as a gigantic battery bank if you wanted.

Bike will not work with just the extender. I don't really see why it wouldn't in theory, but the software throws an error if you try. Not something I'd ever do anyway, but I tried it out of curiosity.

On the bike (extender is unplugged because main battery is charging, but it just plugs into the same port as the charger):


Charging cable collection. Left to right: main charging port, adapter to charge battery directly, adapter to charge extender. To the left of the charging brick is my spare main battery.


Install. There are dedicated mounts for the plate, and a slot for the water bottle cage bosses. Install was simple. Remove main battery, pop the plastic plugs out of the mounting points, use the included hardware to screw it on. Only annoyance was all the cables and wires that run along the top of the battery well, but it still only took a few minutes. It also came with a plastic plate that you could attach a bottle cage to that pops onto the whole mount, though you could also just screw a cage on as normal.


Removal. Swing out this little lever (which can be screwed down to make it harder to remove):


Pop the main catch:


Swing it out:


It came with this small trunk bag to carry it in.


What you get if you power the bike up with the energypak plus plugged in but without a main battery:
 

Browneye

Well-Known Member
Evidently there isn't enough room physically in the main case/compartment for more cells to increase capacity. I would really like to see an option for a 700w or so main pack. And I think they're going to need to figure out something innovative to address this in order to stay on top of the industry.

My guess we'll see either new chemistry like lipo, or flat packs or something in lieu of 18650 cells.
 

jabberwocky

Well-Known Member
Evidently there isn't enough room physically in the main case/compartment for more cells to increase capacity. I would really like to see an option for a 700w or so main pack. And I think they're going to need to figure out something innovative to address this in order to stay on top of the industry.

My guess we'll see either new chemistry like lipo, or flat packs or something in lieu of 18650 cells.

No, I don't think they will release a higher capacity main pack. There isn't room, and since it swings to the side they can't really bulge the battery casing out to cram more cells in there.

The extender is their solution. Main+extender gives 615whr. Giants bikes aren't expensive compared to the other main players and the extender is discounted if bought with the bike, so its not actually a big deal IMO. My bike is fairly light (~41lbs or so) as it comes from the factory, so at least theres that. I would have preferred a 500whr (at least) main battery, and I fully expect the next revision will bump capacities up.

Its like the battery team at Giant was thinking along the lines of the Creo (light bike, small low-power motor with tight software integration so that range is good with less battery capacity) while the motor team was like "we have this giant motor for our MTBs, lets use that!".

Love the bike though. I'm smiling every time I ride it.
 
I posted some info in the Revolt thread, but since info on this thing is pretty sparse online, I thought maybe a dedicated thread would be helpful.

I got my Energypak Plus a few weeks ago, and finally got the firmware updated so I could use it. First ride was yesterday.

Prior to getting it, the info I could find online said the bike would run the main battery down, then switch to the extender. After using it, thats not how it works. The bike seems to pull from both of them while riding, and the battery percentage is based on the combined total. I finished with 31% remaining (for both), and after removing the extender it said the main had 14% left. So over the ride it pulled 424whr from both, ~323whr (of 375) out of the main and 101 (of 240) from the extender. I'll keep track of use on future rides to try and understand the logic. I'm pleased it pulls from both while riding though; if nothing else, its better for battery health to not run them totally down.

I will comment that the battery percentage while riding did seem to go down in steps. Like, it would deplete linearly for a bit, then hold a percentage for a bit, then deplete some more. Overall was as expected. My weight (220lb) and riding style (almost entirely eco, 100% assist) and terrain (hilly, primarily unpaved) I consume a pretty consistent 11.5-12whr per mile. I expected main+extender range to be 50-52ish miles, and consumption was extremely close to that.

The plus does have a USB port (on the bottom close the cable), so you could use it as a gigantic battery bank if you wanted.

Bike will not work with just the extender. I don't really see why it wouldn't in theory, but the software throws an error if you try. Not something I'd ever do anyway, but I tried it out of curiosity.

On the bike (extender is unplugged because main battery is charging, but it just plugs into the same port as the charger):


Charging cable collection. Left to right: main charging port, adapter to charge battery directly, adapter to charge extender. To the left of the charging brick is my spare main battery.


Install. There are dedicated mounts for the plate, and a slot for the water bottle cage bosses. Install was simple. Remove main battery, pop the plastic plugs out of the mounting points, use the included hardware to screw it on. Only annoyance was all the cables and wires that run along the top of the battery well, but it still only took a few minutes. It also came with a plastic plate that you could attach a bottle cage to that pops onto the whole mount, though you could also just screw a cage on as normal.


Removal. Swing out this little lever (which can be screwed down to make it harder to remove):


Pop the main catch:


Swing it out:


It came with this small trunk bag to carry it in.


What you get if you power the bike up with the energypak plus plugged in but without a main battery:
Great detailed information - Thanks
 

gorse

Member
Helpful write up. Still don’t understand why Giant dropped the capacity from 500 to 375 when everyone else is going the other way (niche products excepted).
 

Andy Tee

New Member
Might need your help, guys. Got EnergyPak Plus range extender and it's not working. At all. Main battery goes flat all way down and extender doesn't kick in when it supposed to. Bike powers down when main is flat, turning it ON again gives the same error like main battery is missing - middle red flashing and no power on pedals. Thoughts?
 

jabberwocky

Well-Known Member
Might need your help, guys. Got EnergyPak Plus range extender and it's not working. At all. Main battery goes flat all way down and extender doesn't kick in when it supposed to. Bike powers down when main is flat, turning it ON again gives the same error like main battery is missing - middle red flashing and no power on pedals. Thoughts?
Most recent firmware on the bike? When you push the little button on the extender, do the battery bars light up? You're sure its plugged in all the way?

Not really sure. I will say that IME the bike runs them both down at once (though note evenly), so if you ride for a bit, unplug the extender and the percentage doesn't change, it probably means it isn't working.
 

Andy Tee

New Member
Most recent firmware on the bike? When you push the little button on the extender, do the battery bars light up? You're sure its plugged in all the way?

Not really sure. I will say that IME the bike runs them both down at once (though note evenly), so if you ride for a bit, unplug the extender and the percentage doesn't change, it probably means it isn't working.

Firmware 20200318000

Press the button, all bars lit up

Connected all way in of course and when main battery is flat it's the only source but it gives an error, not power to the motor

In any scenario, main goes flat, extender stays full.
 

Steveinconcord

New Member
I asked my dealer if he could get me the discount on the Energy Pak Plus, since I just bought my Revolt E+ a few months ago. But he can't get Giant to respond to give him the necessary discount code. I've been bugging him about the Pak ever since I bought the bike. This is frustrating!
 

patersont

New Member
I posted some info in the Revolt thread, but since info on this thing is pretty sparse online, I thought maybe a dedicated thread would be helpful.

I got my Energypak Plus a few weeks ago, and finally got the firmware updated so I could use it. First ride was yesterday.

Prior to getting it, the info I could find online said the bike would run the main battery down, then switch to the extender. After using it, thats not how it works. The bike seems to pull from both of them while riding, and the battery percentage is based on the combined total. I finished with 31% remaining (for both), and after removing the extender it said the main had 14% left. So over the ride it pulled 424whr from both, ~323whr (of 375) out of the main and 101 (of 240) from the extender. I'll keep track of use on future rides to try and understand the logic. I'm pleased it pulls from both while riding though; if nothing else, its better for battery health to not run them totally down.

I will comment that the battery percentage while riding did seem to go down in steps. Like, it would deplete linearly for a bit, then hold a percentage for a bit, then deplete some more. Overall was as expected. My weight (220lb) and riding style (almost entirely eco, 100% assist) and terrain (hilly, primarily unpaved) I consume a pretty consistent 11.5-12whr per mile. I expected main+extender range to be 50-52ish miles, and consumption was extremely close to that.

The plus does have a USB port (on the bottom close the cable), so you could use it as a gigantic battery bank if you wanted.

Bike will not work with just the extender. I don't really see why it wouldn't in theory, but the software throws an error if you try. Not something I'd ever do anyway, but I tried it out of curiosity.

On the bike (extender is unplugged because main battery is charging, but it just plugs into the same port as the charger):


Charging cable collection. Left to right: main charging port, adapter to charge battery directly, adapter to charge extender. To the left of the charging brick is my spare main battery.


Install. There are dedicated mounts for the plate, and a slot for the water bottle cage bosses. Install was simple. Remove main battery, pop the plastic plugs out of the mounting points, use the included hardware to screw it on. Only annoyance was all the cables and wires that run along the top of the battery well, but it still only took a few minutes. It also came with a plastic plate that you could attach a bottle cage to that pops onto the whole mount, though you could also just screw a cage on as normal.


Removal. Swing out this little lever (which can be screwed down to make it harder to remove):


Pop the main catch:


Swing it out:


It came with this small trunk bag to carry it in.


What you get if you power the bike up with the energypak plus plugged in but without a main battery:
Thanks for the information, mine is on back order. One question is the extender lockable to the frame?
 

Browneye

Well-Known Member
Helpful write up. Still don’t understand why Giant dropped the capacity from 500 to 375 when everyone else is going the other way (niche products excepted).

Must have missed this...
Cuz people want lighter weight more compact ebikes. And why Specialized launched their SL series road and mtb bikes.
Range generally isn't an issue for most people - in fact, I"ve never used more than 60% of my pack's capacity on any one ride. On the MTB, I can use 80% if I go 25 hard miles.
 

Yarra

New Member
Thanks for the information, mine is on back order. One question is the extender lockable to the frame?
No, it does not lock to the frame. It has a lever to secure it to the top locating pin. That lever is held closed by tightening a screw which holds the lever to the battery body
 

iskjone

Active Member
I've noted before that a lot of E-bike freshmen owners experience "range anxiety" . I did. With experience that anxiety dissipates but it's understandable because you could misjudge and peddling a heavy bike home isn't fun. I don't run out of gas in my my car nor do I push the battery use when I'm on the last led light. Basically, fully charged, my bike can outlast me.
 

patersont

New Member
I've noted before that a lot of E-bike freshmen owners experience "range anxiety" . I did. With experience that anxiety dissipates but it's understandable because you could misjudge and peddling a heavy bike home isn't fun. I don't run out of gas in my my car nor do I push the battery use when I'm on the last led light. Basically, fully charged, my bike can outlast me.
Not really range anxiety , I was originally after the explorer version which was £300 dearer than the fastroad and as I purchased through the cyle2work scheme my cert was for the explorer price so decied to use the leftover cash on the range extender/👍
 

jabberwocky

Well-Known Member
I've noted before that a lot of E-bike freshmen owners experience "range anxiety" . I did. With experience that anxiety dissipates but it's understandable because you could misjudge and peddling a heavy bike home isn't fun. I don't run out of gas in my my car nor do I push the battery use when I'm on the last led light. Basically, fully charged, my bike can outlast me.
Its not really range anxiety, its just knowing what routes I can do and which I can't. My gravel routes vary from 20ish miles to up to near 100, so knowing what the sort of range I can expect out of my batteries/extender at what assist and what average climb/mile is important info when I'm planning a ride.
 

iskjone

Active Member
I came close to draining the battery one time when touring a scenic Maine coastal route. I think is was almost 50 miles and I had plenty power when I parked it for the day. (Almost 30%) I guess the battery range is design by Giant for people like me.