Entry-Level Bike with Suspension?

livejamie

New Member
I'm 6'0 and was looking to spend ~$1500 for a bike to ride around town and do some light off-road stuff and would love any recommendations.

I was looking for a fork suspension with at least 500w, pedal and throttle assist and something that would fit a 6'0 person pretty well.

A regenerative system would be ideal but not necessary.

Thanks so much!
 
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J.R.

Well-Known Member
I think for your height you will need an 18"-19" frame in a mountain bike or a 20"-21" frame in a road/city bike. It doesn't pay to go to cheap with front suspension, you'll want to look for pre-load adjustable (most are) and lockout. 500w direct drive hubs are very affordable and the only way to get regenerative braking, but the cost of regen most times isn't worth it for an affordable bike. Save that money for a saddle post suspension, like a Thudbuster.

You'll be very limited in choice for a ready-made ebike, but if you're mechanically inclined you can get a Bafang or Mac kit for under a grand and buildup a $500.00 mountain bike. Is that something you've thought of doing? Are there any ebikes you've been looking at? It's a big jump, but if you are able to increase your limit to $2k, it would open up a lot more possibilities.
 

Mike Smith

Active Member
Throttle assist sounds nice but once you start riding you will probably rarely use use it as you can ride faster with pedal assist. I can't recommend an ebike in your price range but if you are willing to spend a little more there should be more choices. Don't skimp on something that could last you for years on a cheaper ebike that you may regret buying in a year....Consider the price over a 3 to 4 year span and the difference between a cheap entry level ebike and one from an established company is only pennies per day, plus peace of mind and you will be happy with your decision. My Diamondback Trace EXC from Performance Bikes at about $2200 plus 20% store credit is one of the best purchases I've ever made and I loved it from the start but now after some customizing I dream about it sometime, lol, it's that comfortable and fun to ride. Don't rush as there are new ebikes and deals released every week, but just find one that feels right, I suggest lots of test rides if possible, jump in, and enjoy the ebike experience. There's nothing like it in my opinion, sorry to all my 50 plus friends who want try and regain their youth and still do Triathlons and jump into a freezing lake in May and run 20 miles, but get over it and just get with reality, your doing more harm than good. Buy a quality ebike and you'll never regret it. Have fun and ride. All imho, lol, have fun.
 
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livejamie

New Member
I can get one of those Trace bikes for 40% off with a work discount we get through Diamondback.
 
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livejamie

New Member
Way overpriced for used e-bikes... and a two year old model like that ST1, you don't even know how the battery was taken care of and that's really important.

The sport isn't worth that much but I'm not sure what a reasonable price for the ST1 would be used.
 

livejamie

New Member
It says "I love that it includes both pedal assist and throttle mode as well as seven gears for pedaling. " in the YouTube description.

How much do you think I should offer for it?
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
I think a good rule of thumb is that any e-bike is worth about 50-60% of retail as it goes out the dealer's door.

Physical wear and tear is usually not that bad, so you just have to discover the battery's condition, if you can.

Maybe you could ask the seller, "How much has it been used?" Because with a regular bike, that it sat in a closet for a year is not a bad answer, but for e-bike it's a terrible answer. Batteries should be kept charged up, at least around 50 percent, and never allowed to run all the way down.

The only other thing keeping it from being a steal is service issues. Tire/wheel maintenance will be a bit tough with no quick release on the wheels nor on motor wiring, and for more involved repairs, you're going to take it where?
 
D

Deleted member 803

Guest
I think a good rule of thumb is that any e-bike is worth about 50-60% of retail as it goes out the dealer's door.
I'd like to see any data points you have on this comment. I'm not sure I would agree with you. What basis is fact helped you arrive at this statement?
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
I'd like to see any data points you have on this comment. I'm not sure I would agree with you. What basis is fact helped you arrive at this statement?

I won't be able to engage in that debate here because the "data points" would violate the spirit and policy of this forum. (read the comments by @Ann M. and @Court regarding discussion of specific prices in the linked thread)
http://electricbikereview.com/community/threads/is-msrp-holding-back-ebike-sales-growth.1708/page-2

Generally, full retail price is well above actual value, and one proof I can offer here is that the used market reflects that fact. We won't discuss specific details of discounting in the new e-bike market.

I'm just trying to help someone who is considering buying a used e-bike. :)
 

Court

Administrator
Staff member
I'm 6'0 and was looking to spend ~$1500 for a bike to ride around town and do some light off-road stuff and would love any recommendations.

I was looking for a fork suspension with at least 500w, pedal and throttle assist and something that would fit a 6'0 person pretty well.

A regenerative system would be ideal but not necessary.

Thanks so much!
Seems like some great suggestions have popped up... For the best bang for your buck I agree that building an ebike is a great way to go but you might end up with an uglier design. Used ebikes can be good but you should assume that the battery will need replacement much sooner and that a full service tuneup (which can cost upwards of $80) is needed. There aren't many large frame electric bikes with 500 watt (geared or gearless) motors with solid suspension forks out there being sold new... The starting place for something like that is ~$2,300 based on what I've reviewed (which is everything I see in shops). Here's a list of all the sub $1,500 bikes I've looked at in the past three years, the closest thing I can see to what you're describing is a bike from ProdecoTech and they are launching a bunch of new models this year with mid-mount batteries (though I think the prices are going up). I agree that the Diamondback ebikes are solid and can be had at great prices with corporate discounts (the Overdrive would be great with those large 29" wheels), I think the same is true for Raleigh in some cases. @J.R. made a great point about seat post suspension systems like Thudbusters or Suntour NCX, that's an affordable way to smooth out the ride and get one step closer to full suspension if you've got a hardtail bike. I like large knobby tires because they also smooth out the ride, back to the Overdrive being a good choice :)
 

Mike Smith

Active Member
I can get one of those Trace bikes for 40% off with a work discount we get through Diamondback.

That would be a great deal, especially during one of Performance Bikes specials of 20% or 30% back in store credit with the Team Performance membership. That's plenty of credit to customize it and buy accessories. I couldn't be happier with my DB trace, and if you can get to the Baltimore area, your free to take a long test ride. Good luck with whatever you decide. Live long and ebike.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
I like large knobby tires because they also smooth out the ride

I knew about wider tires, with more air volume, improving ride, but I never considered that knobby's would have an effect on comfort just from the knobs being present.

But now I see, as the knobs squish under the weight, how that would also add a bit to smoothing the ride, especially on hard surfaces.

Nice tip.