entry-level mid drive

ElevenAD

Well-Known Member
>>>>you can always patch a flat without removing the tire
Do you mean with one of those squirt-in products, like Slime?
Well i would always recommend slime and tire liners as a preventative measure with any E-Bike but that's not what i meant, check out this vid!
You have to wait for about 1min before Noob patches the tire, this method is quick and painless😁
If your bike has two hub motors this is a great option lol.
Also please give the E-Bike Noob a Like and a Sub, his channel deserves more views!
 
Last edited:

birdman518

New Member
Region
USA
City
Pinellas County FL
Well i would always recommend slime and tire liners as a preventative measure with any E-Bike but that's not what i meant, check out this vid!
You have to wait for about 1min before Noob patches the tire, this method is quick and painless😁
If your bike has two hub motors this is a great option lol.
Also please give the E-Bike Noob a Like and a Sub, his channel deserves more views!
Looks like the sophisticated repair method I would have used 40 years ago when I
was a Cat 4! I was so bad that the one time I finished with the pack at a practice
criterium my wife missed it photographing some flowers.
 

m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
>>>>you can always patch a flat without removing the tire
Do you mean with one of those squirt-in products, like Slime?
Its also easy to change a tire without removing the wheel with a conventional patch.
1. Deflate the tire
2. Use a tire lever like normal to remove the bead on one side just like you would if the wheel was off.
3. Pull the tube out the side.
4. Find the hole. You may need to spin the wheel around a bit.
5. Patch it.
6. Stuff the tube back in and re-seat the bead - again as you would if the wheel was off.
7. Pump it back up.

I took this picture in the middle of one of those wheel-on patch jobs. I use sealant in my tubes and the Slime I used then still leaked ever so slightly, so on a lazy weekend I would go in and do proper patches. Nowadays I use a better sealant that seals dry and is MUCH more effective thanSlime (see test linked below).

By the way this bike is clearly a hub motor, but I have more or less built only mid drives for quite some time. Mids are more versatile, but for the beginner a hub is certainly easier. Anyone who has ever ridden a bicycle intuitively knows how to ride a hub bike. A mid drive rider needs to learn the implications of the extra power running thru the chain. But the production bikes you are looking at really don't have the same concerns as they use much less power (250w-750w vs. 1750-2500).

Also: Get a bike with a throttle. the only reason bikes don't have them is for legal reasons in a country you don't live in. Also ego. A throttle is a tool in the toolbox. Use it. You won't suddenly gain an inch around your waist or suddenly lose interest in pedaling.

IMG_20180623_123127.jpg


 

m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I couldn't disagree more. A mid drive with a torque sensor is just like riding a bicycle. An eBike with a cadence sensor requires much more control over the motor and PAS levels.
I agree completely with @AHicks . Cadence sensing is an artifact from analog cycling's past. Go back 100 years and derailleurs were derided as being for the soft. It was literally called 'cheating'. Sound familiar? That attitude is long dead and gone and so will the prejudice (which is a deep seated and visceral commitment for those who demand it) against cadence sensing.

Consider this, and remember this will change nobody's mind who has already made it up. Not being firmly committed either way use this opportunity to examine both objectively.