Ergon GP3, or The Ultimate Bike Grip (Hand Position Tutorial)

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
In the self-styled way, I acclaim the Ergon GP3 the best bike grips ever made! :) Some tips will follow:

Proper Setup

Ergon GP3 Hand Positions (1 of 6).jpg

First of all, the GP3 come in two sizes. Buy the Large variety only in case you have really large hands. The Ergons might be too wide to fit your gadget-crammed handlebars, and it is also better not to change the brake lever position. If you still see the yellow interior of the grip after you have slid it fully onto the handlebar, you need to shorten the grip. Use a very sharp knife to shorten the grip -- and be cautious to not cut your fingers! (You have been warned) :) No yellow part should be visible with the properly slid grip. The wrist supports should point slightly upwards. Add the bar-ends. The angle is your choice, with 30-45 degrees being the most reasonable. Tighten the screw at 5 Nm. Again: No yellow part should be visible inside!

Ergon GP3 Hand Positions (2 of 6).jpg

The "normal" or "safety" hand position. Use it while riding with traffic or on crowded bike or multiple-use paths.

Ergon GP3 Hand Positions (3 of 6).jpg

Modern e-MTBs sport the "1-finger" brake levers; modern commuter e-bikes have the "2-finger" brake levers. Never place more fingers than necessary on the lever. While riding in a crowded area, rest your finger(s) on brake levers in a relaxed way; you don't want to make your fingers tired but you might want to brake rather fast.



Ergon GP3 Hand Positions (4 of 6).jpg

The "steering-wheel" or "trail" hand position. That's what makes the Ergons so great. You delicately rest your three fingers on the bar-end, while your thumb and little finger ensure a proper hold. You steer your e-bike as you were operating your car's steering wheel. That hand position is proper for very long rides and ensures the best control over the bike even in very rough terrain. The benefits:
  • The hand doesn't get tired or numb (people with carpal tunnel syndrome will be delighted)
  • You exercise the perfect control over your bike, especially with wide handlebars
  • In rough terrain, you just tighten your grip a little bit for even better steering control
  • During "washboard" sections of gravel roads, ease the hand-grip. The bar-end will travel vertically among your fingers, providing rapid-vibration protection to your hands -- especially, owners of rigid-fork e-bikes will be happy!
I just want to tell you that I ride over 90% my long trips in the "trail" hand position. Specifically, uphill ride is extremely easy with that hand position. Note: You can move your hands to the "safety" position instantly, as the bar-ends are small.

Ergon GP3 Hand Positions (5 of 6).jpg

The "Easy Rider" hand position. Use on a very long ride in safe environment when you are really tired. Rest your wrist and thumb on the wrist-support. The part of the palm near to the little finger shall rest where the bar-end-plug is normally located.

Falling with Your Bike

Ergon GP3 Hand Positions (6 of 6).jpg

There are two survival techniques, shall your bike fall:
  1. Jump off the bike as graciously as Bambi would do it :) and let the bike fall between your legs (It requires a long practice);
  2. Provided you're wearing the helmet, move your hands instantly to the "safety position" and just fall together with your e-bike. Your hands shall be on the grips and your feet shall stay planted on the pedals! Your head will probably hit the ground but it's protected. You might get some bruises. But your limbs won't get broken and the hands won't be damaged, as the latter are protected by the GP3 bar-end. Trust me: I know the best how to fall with the bike. The stains of sun-molten asphalt on my Trance E+ right-hand GP3 bar-end are the proof. The grip and my helmet took the most of the impact. And I have fallen with my bikes many times before I mastered the (1) technique :D
Ride safely!
 
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Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
I have to disagree. Try to splurge on an SQL 702 , you will trash the ergons instantly.
The same goes for the saddles.

Conclusion- the ultimate bike grips are made by SQL , Made in Germany. Like Ortlieb . Is good that great things are still being made in Deutschland 😉.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
What leads you to thinking SQLabs products are made in Germany, or, that Ergon products are not German? Just asking.
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
I know the SQL brand well enough and once you feel the material and ergonomics you know is the best. As far as being german, that's where their research labs are, and that's where they say that their products are made.

I didn't say that Ergons are not German. They are just a run of the mill grips. Good enough for the average rider.

Try some SQL's and lmk how you like them 😉. They also make some outstanding handlebars.
Ergonomics is their speciality and they are using very good materials. Not all rubber compounds are the same.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
Excellent article, Stefan!

May be this will be helpful if posted under Parts and Accessories section and a lot of the readers would find it useful.

Otherwise, it would get buried under other threads here.

@Angela M. , could we move this to Parts and Accessories and/or Guides section ?

Thanks
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Ergonomics is their speciality and they are using very good materials. Not all rubber compounds are the same.
I'm not in a quarrel with you. Certainly SQLabs products are excellent.
Yet whatever you wrote about SQLabs refers to Ergon as well. Specifically, "Ergon-omics" :D

@Angela M., thank you for moving the thread!
 

Akrotiri

Active Member
In the self-styled way, I acclaim the Ergon GP3 the best bike grips ever made! :) Some tips will follow:

Proper Setup

View attachment 61989
First of all, the GP3 come in two sizes. Buy the Large variety only in case you have really large hands. The Ergons might be too wide to fit your gadget-crammed handlebars, and it is also better not to change the brake lever position. If you still see the yellow interior of the grip after you have slid it fully onto the handlebar, you need to shorten the grip. Use a very sharp knife to shorten the grip -- and be cautious to not cut your fingers! (You have been warned) :) No yellow part should be visible with the properly slid grip. The wrist supports should point slightly upwards. Add the bar-ends. The angle is your choice, with 30-45 degrees being the most reasonable. Tighten the screw at 5 Nm. Again: No yellow part should be visible inside!

View attachment 61990
The "normal" or "safety" hand position. Use it while riding with traffic or on crowded bike or multiple-use paths.

View attachment 61991
Modern e-MTBs sport the "1-finger" brake levers; modern commuter e-bikes have the "2-finger" brake levers. Never place more fingers than necessary on the lever. While riding in a crowded area, rest your finger(s) on brake levers in a relaxed way; you don't want to make your fingers tired but you might want to brake rather fast.



View attachment 61992
The "steering-wheel" or "trail" hand position. That's what makes the Ergons so great. You delicately rest your three fingers on the bar-end, while your thumb and little finger ensure a proper hold. You steer your e-bike as you were operating your car's steering wheel. That hand position is proper for very long rides and ensures the best control over the bike even in very rough terrain. The benefits:
  • The hand doesn't get tired or numb (people with carpal tunnel syndrome will be delighted)
  • You exercise the perfect control over your bike, especially with wide handlebars
  • In rough terrain, you just tighten your grip a little bit for even better steering control
  • During "washboard" sections of gravel roads, ease the hand-grip. The bar-end will travel vertically among your fingers, providing rapid-vibration protection to your hands -- especially, owners of rigid-fork e-bikes will be happy!
I just want to tell you that I ride over 90% my long trips in the "trail" hand position. Specifically, uphill ride is extremely easy with that hand position. Note: You can move your hands to the "safety" position instantly, as the bar-ends are small.

View attachment 61993
The "Easy Rider" hand position. Use on a very long ride in safe environment when you are really tired. Rest your wrist and thumb on the wrist-support. The part of the palm near to the little finger shall rest where the bar-end-plug is normally located.

Falling with Your Bike

View attachment 61994
There are two survival techniques, shall your bike fall:
  1. Jump off the bike as graciously as Bambi would do it :) and let the bike fall between your legs (It requires a long practice);
  2. Provided you're wearing the helmet, move your hands instantly to the "safety position" and just fall together with your e-bike. Your hands shall be on the grips and your feet shall stay planted on the pedals! Your head will probably hit the ground but it's protected. You might get some bruises. But your limbs won't get broken and the hands won't be damaged, as the latter are protected by the GP3 bar-end. Trust me: I know the best how to fall with the bike. The stains of sun-molten asphalt on my Trance E+ right-hand GP3 bar-end are the proof. The grip and my helmet took the most of the impact. And I have fallen with my bikes many times before I mastered the (1) technique :D
Ride safely!
I’ve been thinking of getting these grips too. But for a more upright position on long rides. Can the curved part be adjusted so the hooked part is basically angled to 90 degrees thus shortening my reach and providing a more upright position when I want?

The 45 degrees you mentioned doesn’t seem add an upright position.
 

Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
@Stefan Miles, I take it you ordered the medium size? I've ordered a set of the Ergon grips (without the horns) in a large, because my glove size is a large.
After reading your post I'm considering changing my order to the Ergon's with the horns.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Mine are Large. I don't think the Medium are any worse. I really encourage you to take the GP3 (ones with the three-finger bar ends). Currently, I almost exclusively ride in the "Easy Rider" position on any longer ride, or holding the bar-ends in rough terrain. I only move my hands to the traditional grip part when I know I might need to unexpectedly use the brakes (dense traffic, bike path with a lot of people etc).
 

Law

Active Member
I know the SQL brand well enough and once you feel the material and ergonomics you know is the best. As far as being german, that's where their research labs are, and that's where they say that their products are made.

I didn't say that Ergons are not German. They are just a run of the mill grips. Good enough for the average rider.

Try some SQL's and lmk how you like them 😉. They also make some outstanding handlebars.
Ergonomics is their speciality and they are using very good materials. Not all rubber compounds are the same.
Ty for posting as I thought the “horned“ ends on ergon were too stiff vs my plebeian grips on my bulls bike.

You know coming from motorcycle background those leather grips look really attractive but will the stitching catch on flesh hand? Always wore gloves
 

reed scott

Well-Known Member
I have to disagree. Try to splurge on an SQL 702 , you will trash the ergons instantly.
The same goes for the saddles.

Conclusion- the ultimate bike grips are made by SQL , Made in Germany. Like Ortlieb . Is good that great things are still being made in Deutschland 😉.Hea
I have to disagree. Try to splurge on an SQL 702 , you will trash the ergons instantly.
The same goes for the saddles.

Conclusion- the ultimate bike grips are made by SQL , Made in Germany. Like Ortlieb . Is good that great things are still being made in Deutschland 😉.

These horn-like protrusions on one's handlebars are a new and strange concept to me. Stefan's tutorial was enlightening. Seems like these could be quite useful. I went to SQL and found their site ... lacking to say the least. I could gain no information regarding the benefits of SQL over Stefan's fave brand. I really don't like the look of them, either brand. But then ... in my younger days I rode a road bike for many years with a forearm cup and a unicorn looking thing for my hands. I will reserve judgement. 😶
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
These horn-like protrusions on one's handlebars are a new and strange concept to me. Stefan's tutorial was enlightening. Seems like these could be quite useful. I went to SQL and found their site ... lacking to say the least. I could gain no information regarding the benefits of SQL over Stefan's fave brand. I really don't like the look of them, either brand. But then ... in my younger days I rode a road bike for many years with a forearm cup and a unicorn looking thing for my hands. I will reserve judgement. 😶
Is not only ergonomics buy also the quality of the rubber material. It's a much better feel and texture.
Until Stefan buys some Sql grips and gives his seal of approval😉 , try to do a better study on this brand next time,
The outwards unicorn shape perfectly fits the outward palm shape. And you can steer the ebike using that as leverage. Different sizes of course. S/M\L.

This SQL brand Is the Mercedes or Lexus of handlebars , seats , insoles and of course handlebar grips. I had a backup brand new Ergon GP3 and had to throw it in the trash after getting this ones. It's a bigger hassle selling it then throwing it away...

And the unicorn shape - That's one of their many designs , if you had looked carefully on the website there are other designs.

I will have to send this post/thread to SQL management , they owe me now😉.
 

reed scott

Well-Known Member
Is not only ergonomics buy also the quality of the rubber material. It's a much better feel and texture.
Until Stefan buys some Sql grips and gives his seal of approval😉 , try to do a better study on this brand next time,
The outwards unicorn shape perfectly fits the outward palm shape. And you can steer the ebike using that as leverage. Different sizes of course. S/M\L.

This SQL brand Is the Mercedes or Lexus of handlebars , seats , insoles and of course handlebar grips. I had a backup brand new Ergon GP3 and had to throw it in the trash after getting this ones. It's a bigger hassle selling it then throwing it away...

And the unicorn shape - That's one of their many designs , if you had looked carefully on the website there are other designs.

I will have to send this post/thread to SQL management , they owe me now😉.
All you say may very well be true. The SQL site was like looking at a run of the mill bike parts ordering page. I got zero feel for the product. Show me some ( not you ) videos or pics of what the whole shebang looks like. Give me some idea of why your product is so good. Obviously this company is depending on word of mouth. Not enough to get me interested over here across the pond.
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
All you say may very well be true. The SQL site was like looking at a run of the mill bike parts ordering page. I got zero feel for the product. Show me some ( not you ) videos or pics of what the whole shebang looks like. Give me some idea of why your product is so good. Obviously this company is depending on word of mouth. Not enough to get me interested over here across the pond.
Stick with your Honda for now, or take a plunge like i did 😉 and enjoy the new Benz. Before i bought it there were literally zero users on ebr. I noticed it on some fancy ebikes and did my research. I think member @Alaskan also uses them and he know quality stuff.
 

McCorby

Active Member
Stick with your Honda for now, or take a plunge like i did 😉 and enjoy the new Benz. Before i bought it there were literally zero users on ebr. I noticed it on some fancy ebikes and did my research. I think member @Alaskan also uses them and he know quality stuff.
Cool! You like your SQL products. Why don’t you start a thread on them instead of derailing this one?
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Great work, as always Stefan. Excellent description of how best to use the "horns" on Ergon grips.

@McCorby, Stefan's title, declaring the Ergons "the ultimate" without looking at any other grip, almost invites challenge from anyone else that prefers something else. I have ergons with horns on my Delight and SR Labs 702 on my Allant. I get the merits of both and could not say if one or the other is the ultimate. Both are excellent. They each have their virtues. I really like the cork compound version of the Ergons, the look and the feel of them is outstanding.

SQ also makes bar ends to combine with their or anyone's grip to provide an alternate hand position.

barend_right_rear.jpg
SQlab+innerbarend.jpg
o
 

linklemming

Well-Known Member
Great work, as always Stefan. Excellent description of how best to use the "horns" on Ergon grips.

@McCorby, Stefan's title, declaring the Ergons "the ultimate" without looking at any other grip, almost invites challenge from anyone else that prefers something else. I have ergons with horns on my Delight and SR Labs 702 on my Allant. I get the merits of both and could not say if one or the other is the ultimate. Both are excellent. They each have their virtues. I really like the cork compound version of the Ergons, the look and the feel of them is outstanding.

SQ also makes bar ends to combine with their or anyone's grip to provide an alternate hand position.

View attachment 69353 View attachment 69354o
Yeah, using the word 'ultimate' seems pretty pretentious to me. Im curious how he knows what I need.

I tried the GP1 (basically the same without the horns) and didnt like them. They really limited/locked your hands to one position which isnt always the best thing offroad and I thought the outer extensions were too hard/large.

The 'horns on the GP3 are really nothing more than bar ends which I used 20 years ago. You dont have to go with Ergon to get that functionality.

After trying 10 different grips this summer(including the GP1s), I settled on these specialized countour grips in XLarge (I hated them in smaller sizes).
BLABLA.jpg