Ergon GP3, or The Ultimate Bike Grip (Hand Position Tutorial)

Mulezen

Well-Known Member
I’ve played with the install angles enough I guess. Any comments though would be appreciated. I chose the longer extends because of XL hands. The cork is an improvement over the older GP3 on my other bike
9B22D0B7-249B-4B93-8506-36395EDE88E4.jpeg
 

Mulezen

Well-Known Member
I might try that mirror placement.
I do like the extra hand (horns) placement for descents and for powering through flats with power off. It took me awhile to get the confidence to use them
 

James vL

New Member
Thank you for your very interesting article. I’m a newbie on this forum - thanks for having me, guys (it seems to be all guys on here!). Question: I have ordered a Homage with the GX option and bar ends. I notice you have a mirror attached to your bar end. Is that a model of mirror you would recommend? Does anyone else use a rear view mirror? I have one on my present bike and it’s very flimsy and liable to slip out of position. Any recommendations?
 

Mulezen

Well-Known Member
I’m sure there’s a thread that addresses that...BTW there are many women on this site who kindly allow us guys to post
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Mirrycle is very popular amongst the Forum users because it is inexpensive, allows several mounting positions, and can be set very tight thanks to its brass fittings. Even if your bike falls, the chances are the mirror would survive the hit (I've experienced many falls of my e-bikes and all four Mirrycles I use are still intact). Mirrycle does not depend if this is right or left side traffic (you can mount it on the right hand bar end in the UK).

Using a rear-view mirror is highly recommended. E-bikes are fast and using the mirror increases the chance of not being hit by a car, especially on cornering on a junction (right turn in case of the UK).

A good thing to have. And yes, there are many ladies on these Fora 😊
 

Law

Active Member
I recently slapped a set of small Ergon GP2s on my vintage Trek that replaced some old school aluminum bar ends. Yes, I have tiny girlish hands. Pleased with the smallish ends and the handles have a pleasant ergonomic feel to them. I actually use bar ends as leverage when cranking up out of the saddle.

That being said, the SQLab handles themselves look pretty sweet but will leave it at that.
View attachment 69356
SQ labs Handles arrived today. I was looking for more premium softer grips, these are hard as rock. Good luck with any returns as they want 25 bucks on any return unless is there mistake. It’s funny how opinions get in the way.

Ergon.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
SQ labs Handles arrived today. I was looking for more premium softer grips, these are hard as rock.
Good luck with any returns as they want 25 bucks on any return unless is there mistake. It’s funny how opinions get in the way.

Ergon.
Try these Entrac Comfort Grips as an alternative to Ergon & SQL Labs... free shipping and returns. ;)
1604014125386.png
 
Last edited:

Hintrod

New Member
In the self-styled way, I acclaim the Ergon GP3 the best bike grips ever made! :) Some tips will follow:

Proper Setup

View attachment 61989
First of all, the GP3 come in two sizes. Buy the Large variety only in case you have really large hands. The Ergons might be too wide to fit your gadget-crammed handlebars, and it is also better not to change the brake lever position. If you still see the yellow interior of the grip after you have slid it fully onto the handlebar, you need to shorten the grip. Use a very sharp knife to shorten the grip -- and be cautious to not cut your fingers! (You have been warned) :) No yellow part should be visible with the properly slid grip. The wrist supports should point slightly upwards. Add the bar-ends. The angle is your choice, with 30-45 degrees being the most reasonable. Tighten the screw at 5 Nm. Again: No yellow part should be visible inside!

View attachment 61990
The "normal" or "safety" hand position. Use it while riding with traffic or on crowded bike or multiple-use paths.

View attachment 61991
Modern e-MTBs sport the "1-finger" brake levers; modern commuter e-bikes have the "2-finger" brake levers. Never place more fingers than necessary on the lever. While riding in a crowded area, rest your finger(s) on brake levers in a relaxed way; you don't want to make your fingers tired but you might want to brake rather fast.



View attachment 61992
The "steering-wheel" or "trail" hand position. That's what makes the Ergons so great. You delicately rest your three fingers on the bar-end, while your thumb and little finger ensure a proper hold. You steer your e-bike as you were operating your car's steering wheel. That hand position is proper for very long rides and ensures the best control over the bike even in very rough terrain. The benefits:
  • The hand doesn't get tired or numb (people with carpal tunnel syndrome will be delighted)
  • You exercise the perfect control over your bike, especially with wide handlebars
  • In rough terrain, you just tighten your grip a little bit for even better steering control
  • During "washboard" sections of gravel roads, ease the hand-grip. The bar-end will travel vertically among your fingers, providing rapid-vibration protection to your hands -- especially, owners of rigid-fork e-bikes will be happy!
I just want to tell you that I ride over 90% my long trips in the "trail" hand position. Specifically, uphill ride is extremely easy with that hand position. Note: You can move your hands to the "safety" position instantly, as the bar-ends are small.

View attachment 61993
The "Easy Rider" hand position. Use on a very long ride in safe environment when you are really tired. Rest your wrist and thumb on the wrist-support. The part of the palm near to the little finger shall rest where the bar-end-plug is normally located.

Falling with Your Bike

View attachment 61994
There are two survival techniques, shall your bike fall:
  1. Jump off the bike as graciously as Bambi would do it :) and let the bike fall between your legs (It requires a long practice);
  2. Provided you're wearing the helmet, move your hands instantly to the "safety position" and just fall together with your e-bike. Your hands shall be on the grips and your feet shall stay planted on the pedals! Your head will probably hit the ground but it's protected. You might get some bruises. But your limbs won't get broken and the hands won't be damaged, as the latter are protected by the GP3 bar-end. Trust me: I know the best how to fall with the bike. The stains of sun-molten asphalt on my Trance E+ right-hand GP3 bar-end are the proof. The grip and my helmet took the most of the impact. And I have fallen with my bikes many times before I mastered the (1) technique :D
Ride safely!
Thank you for your great tutorial and explanation on the Ergon grips it is quite useful. I have a pair on my bike And I really didn’t know the proper technique with three fingers as you explained
 

Akrotiri

Active Member
In the self-styled way, I acclaim the Ergon GP3 the best bike grips ever made! :) Some tips will follow:

Proper Setup

View attachment 61989
First of all, the GP3 come in two sizes. Buy the Large variety only in case you have really large hands. The Ergons might be too wide to fit your gadget-crammed handlebars, and it is also better not to change the brake lever position. If you still see the yellow interior of the grip after you have slid it fully onto the handlebar, you need to shorten the grip. Use a very sharp knife to shorten the grip -- and be cautious to not cut your fingers! (You have been warned) :) No yellow part should be visible with the properly slid grip. The wrist supports should point slightly upwards. Add the bar-ends. The angle is your choice, with 30-45 degrees being the most reasonable. Tighten the screw at 5 Nm. Again: No yellow part should be visible inside!

View attachment 61990
The "normal" or "safety" hand position. Use it while riding with traffic or on crowded bike or multiple-use paths.

View attachment 61991
Modern e-MTBs sport the "1-finger" brake levers; modern commuter e-bikes have the "2-finger" brake levers. Never place more fingers than necessary on the lever. While riding in a crowded area, rest your finger(s) on brake levers in a relaxed way; you don't want to make your fingers tired but you might want to brake rather fast.



View attachment 61992
The "steering-wheel" or "trail" hand position. That's what makes the Ergons so great. You delicately rest your three fingers on the bar-end, while your thumb and little finger ensure a proper hold. You steer your e-bike as you were operating your car's steering wheel. That hand position is proper for very long rides and ensures the best control over the bike even in very rough terrain. The benefits:
  • The hand doesn't get tired or numb (people with carpal tunnel syndrome will be delighted)
  • You exercise the perfect control over your bike, especially with wide handlebars
  • In rough terrain, you just tighten your grip a little bit for even better steering control
  • During "washboard" sections of gravel roads, ease the hand-grip. The bar-end will travel vertically among your fingers, providing rapid-vibration protection to your hands -- especially, owners of rigid-fork e-bikes will be happy!
I just want to tell you that I ride over 90% my long trips in the "trail" hand position. Specifically, uphill ride is extremely easy with that hand position. Note: You can move your hands to the "safety" position instantly, as the bar-ends are small.

View attachment 61993
The "Easy Rider" hand position. Use on a very long ride in safe environment when you are really tired. Rest your wrist and thumb on the wrist-support. The part of the palm near to the little finger shall rest where the bar-end-plug is normally located.

Falling with Your Bike

View attachment 61994
There are two survival techniques, shall your bike fall:
  1. Jump off the bike as graciously as Bambi would do it :) and let the bike fall between your legs (It requires a long practice);
  2. Provided you're wearing the helmet, move your hands instantly to the "safety position" and just fall together with your e-bike. Your hands shall be on the grips and your feet shall stay planted on the pedals! Your head will probably hit the ground but it's protected. You might get some bruises. But your limbs won't get broken and the hands won't be damaged, as the latter are protected by the GP3 bar-end. Trust me: I know the best how to fall with the bike. The stains of sun-molten asphalt on my Trance E+ right-hand GP3 bar-end are the proof. The grip and my helmet took the most of the impact. And I have fallen with my bikes many times before I mastered the (1) technique :D
Ride safely!
Ok so I decided I’m going to purchase the ergon gp3 bar ends. Just to confirm Stefan , these are compatible with my trek allant 8s?
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Ok so I decided I’m going to purchase the ergon gp3 bar ends. Just to confirm Stefan , these are compatible with my trek allant 8s?
All modern flat handlebars have the tube diameter of 22.2 mm at the grip section (+/- machining tolerances). For this reason, Ergon doesn't even need to give the diameter info. Yes, these grips will fit and Mulezen has confirmed it for the Allant+.
 

Akrotiri

Active Member
All modern flat handlebars have the tube diameter of 22.2 mm at the grip section (+/- machining tolerances). For this reason, Ergon doesn't even need to give the diameter info. Yes, these grips will fit and Mulezen has confirmed it for the Allant+.
Should I get the small ? Not sure how to measure my hand. My frame is size medium and I’m basically courts height and weight.
 

RandallS

Well-Known Member
I might try that mirror placement.
I do like the extra hand (horns) placement for descents and for powering through flats with power off. It took me awhile to get the confidence to use them
I use that mirror placement for most of my rides. If extended periods will be on roads with traffic, I twist and swivel it into the more traditional up and to the left (for my region with driving on the right).
I haven't had to retighten the mounting either, such a great product!

Now back to grips...
 

Akrotiri

Active Member
72816AD5-F8A2-4DE0-A3FA-2B5A1D10E844.jpeg



Installed mine and today was first ride with them. I adjusted the ends to the 45degrees Stefan recommended and it’s perfect. Honestly,I can’t believe how much of a difference they make on the hills. I can stay in eco mode now even for long steep inclines since the bar ends add so much leverage. The extra hand positions will serve me well too on rides longer than two hours although today’s ride was only 90 minutes. I ended up getting the large since my hands were 23 cm around. Perfect fit and great purchase. Very helpful thread thanks everyone.
 

como813

New Member
i prefer specialized contour grips i had ergon on another bike, they're sitting a box now. if your seat height and reach is correct the grips should be easy to adjust and get no discomfort keeping straight wrists
 

MMC

Active Member
Grips are like saddles. There really is no perfect grip as everyone's hands are different and everyone's riding position and forward weight will be different.
I used the Ergon GP2's for years and just recently switched to the Ergon GX1.
Any grip that makes your riding more comfortable and reduces ulnar nerve discomfort will be the ultimate grips

Not sure if any of you are doing this but try loosening the grip collar a little bit. Don't torque them down where the grips won't move.
Torque them down to approx 2/3 nm vs the normal 4/5 nm. Allow the grips to pivot/turn a bit under medium force.
This will allow you to pivot the grips slightly as you ride and your ulnar nerve may not suffer as much on prolonged hand positions.
Put a dab of threadlocker on the bolt and it won't loosen and fall out. You will know ahead of time when the bolt gets too loose as the grips move too freely.
Thanked my doctor for this tip as he is also a long time cyclist.