Evelo Omega - 200 Mile Review

FloridaZen

New Member
Region
USA
Alaskan thank you for the great review! Especially the add on‘s! Very help for those of us just getting started.

Did you consider other bikes? Wondering if you looked at the Specialized Como 5.0 and your thought why you chose Evelo over the others. My wife and I are looking and we want the more cruiser ride, quality, lower maintenance and long range.
 

Edrummer

Active Member
Alaskan: Waiting for your review on rack mounted battery! Possible video on the sound the motor makes on flats and hills would be great.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Alaskan thank you for the great review! Especially the add on‘s! Very help for those of us just getting started.

Did you consider other bikes? Wondering if you looked at the Specialized Como 5.0 and your thought why you chose Evelo over the others. My wife and I are looking and we want the more cruiser ride, quality, lower maintenance and long range.
I looked at many different bikes. I have had many different ebikes. I needed one with more power and torque to overcome limitations being imposed on me by a health challenge.

The Como 5.0 was similar in performance to a bike I already owned, a Trek Allant 9.9S. Both required more effort than I have, when on a down cycle, getting back up the steep hill we live at the top of. We have a top notch Specialized dealer a mile away (at the bottom of the hill). They are also dealer for the Harley Davidson Series 1 ebikes.

I do not need or want an electric motorcyclye but needed an ebike with about 30% more power which is a niche well occupied by the Evelo. The bike is sold only in the USA and does not make compromises to be legal in Canada, the UK, Europe or Australia with their tighter regulations.

Evelo got the nod because of bike specs, specifically motor wattage and torque, build quality, company reputation, warranty and return policy. It is a well designed, well built bike with a solid, maintenance free drive train and fits the niche I needed, just right...more power than Bosch, Specialized, Giant or any of the Euro bikes. With the soon to arrive second battery and rack, range should be near 100 miles, not bad for a heavier bike with abundant power.
 
Last edited:

FloridaZen

New Member
Region
USA
I looked at many different bikes. I have had many different ebikes. I needed one with more power and torque to overcome limitations being imposed on me by a health challenge.

The Como 5.0 was similar in performance to a bike I already owned, a Trek Allant 9.9S. Both required more effort than I have, when on a down cycle, getting back up the steep hill we live at the top of. We have a top notch Specialized dealer a mile away (at the bottom of the hill). They are also dealer for the Harley Davidson Series 1 ebikes.

I do not need or want an electric motorcyclye but needed an ebike with about 30% more power which is a niche well occupied by the Evelo. The bike is sold only in the USA and does not make compromises to be legal in Canada, the UK, Europe or Australia with their tighter regulations.

Evelo got the nod because of bike specs, specifically motor wattage and torque, build quality, company reputation, warranty and return policy. It is a well designed well built bike with a solid, maintenance free drive train and fits the niche I needed, just right...more power than Bosch, Specialized, Giant or any of the Euro bikes. With the soon to arrive second battery and rack, range should be near 100 miles, not bad for a heavier bike with abundant power.
All the best on your health journey!!

Thank you this is very helpful. This lack of ability to ride a bike before you purchase, even at the LBS makes this decision for us new to Ebikes a bit more difficult. I want something of quality so that I reduce the odds of needing to deal with repairs. I want lower maintenance as I am already very busy. Hearing you opinion on the quality is helpful.

I don’t need that extra power here in Florida but trips to the mountains of TN it may be a big benefit.

I will be getting 2 bike one for the better half. Do you think this too much for bike for a 5’4” 110 lb ? She is athletic … or should I look at other bikes for her?
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
All the best on your health journey!!

Thank you this is very helpful. This lack of ability to ride a bike before you purchase, even at the LBS makes this decision for us new to Ebikes a bit more difficult. I want something of quality so that I reduce the odds of needing to deal with repairs. I want lower maintenance as I am already very busy. Hearing you opinion on the quality is helpful.

I don’t need that extra power here in Florida but trips to the mountains of TN it may be a big benefit.

I will be getting 2 bike one for the better half. Do you think this too much for bike for a 5’4” 110 lb ? She is athletic … or should I look at other bikes for her?
If you can't test ride you would likely appreciate one of the unique aspects Evelo offers, their 21 day satisfaction guarantee. Starting the day your bike arrives at your door, you have 21 days to evaluate the bike. If, for any reason, if does not meet your needs you can have it shipped back to Evelo, at their expense, for a full refund, no restocking fee.

For your wife, you might consider their Galaxy 500, same maintenance free drive train with carbon belt and auto shifting with a bit let power and considerably lighter weight. This is a bike well suited to a smaller woman.

Their tech and warranty support is the best I have seen. They have terrific, knowledgeable bike techs that are easy to get ahold of, help you figure out how to make adjustments, figure out what is not working right and how to go about making the fix. They do not hesitate so send replacement parts when things go wrong, and they do on every bike or machine made by the hand of man. They really do make every effort to get you back up and riding in the least amount of time. If a repair is needed for which you need a special tool, they will send you one. If the needed repair is beyond your skill set, they will contract with a local bike shop and get it done for you. It really is a great company, in my experience.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Is the range actually as high as they claim?
I wouldn't expect that when you first start riding an e-bike. You're bound to be disappointed. I also wouldn't expect it under all conditions - which can clearly be all over the map. I would think an experienced rider, under the right conditions, just might find that "do-able"!
 

retiredNH

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I wouldn't expect that when you first start riding an e-bike. You're bound to be disappointed. I also wouldn't expect it under all conditions - which can clearly be all over the map. I would think an experienced rider, under the right conditions, just might find that "do-able"!
Everything depends on your assist level. For example, spouse and I do a lunch ride several times a week when I'm between Chemo cycles and my energy level is up enough. Our most common ride is 11.5 miles RT with about 1000 feet of climbing. We tend to use power only for climbing, and only as much as we need. I have less strength than spouse, so I tend to use about 20% of my battery. She uses about 15%. So for either of us, a 50 mile ride would not be out of the question. However, we only average about 10.5 MPH. If we went faster, our battery use would go up and our range way down.
I've read posts by folks here that like to ride at max power as much as they can. They probably only get about 20 miles to a charge.
 

OnePutt

New Member
Region
USA
Alaskan, thank you for your well written review of the Evelo Omega. Reviews from knowledgeable customers are so valuable to me as I try to find the "right" ebike for my needs. The Omega has what I'm looking for in an ebike with the exception of a rigid frame. Actually I was quite surprised that any bicycle capable of going faster than 20 mph would be built with no suspension, not only for riding comfort, but stress to the bike frame when hitting an unnoticed pot hole. I read you added a Kinekt spring loaded seat post and was wondering if you rode the Omega before you made that change, and if so, what was your before and after impression of ride comfort, and do you have any safety concerns in the event of a hard jolt?
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Alaskan, thank you for your well written review of the Evelo Omega. Reviews from knowledgeable customers are so valuable to me as I try to find the "right" ebike for my needs. The Omega has what I'm looking for in an ebike with the exception of a rigid frame. Actually I was quite surprised that any bicycle capable of going faster than 20 mph would be built with no suspension, not only for riding comfort, but stress to the bike frame when hitting an unnoticed pot hole. I read you added a Kinekt spring loaded seat post and was wondering if you rode the Omega before you made that change, and if so, what was your before and after impression of ride comfort, and do you have any safety concerns in the event of a hard jolt?
I installed the Kinekt before my first ride so no before and after. I am 72 and weigh 190 lbs. I find the bike quite comfortable. I also changed out the OEM stem for the Kinekt suspension stem as well. Between the two the bike is plenty comfortable and only really hits hard on the biggest flaws in the road. I watch the road ahead and get on my feet and off the saddle when I see a big one coming up and let my legs be the shocks. The Omega has a remarkably robust, reinforced and rigid frame for a step through bike. I live atop a 500 foot hill with a steep winding road down to town. At 35 mph moving through S curves, the bike tracks well and goes where you point it with nary a wiggle or wobble.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
One of the reasons the Omega does well without a suspension is about the tires. The 2.8" width really tames the expansion joints and pavement cracks. They run well at lower pressures too. I don't know about these tires, but I can say the 27.5x2.8 Schwalbe Super Moto's have a fairly low rolling resistance, especially considering their size.
 

OnePutt

New Member
Region
USA
I've been impressed with the Evelo brand their use of quality components in the Omega model, so that's why I was surprised by a rigid frame, unless it simply wasn't necessary. I appreciate the replies and plan to keep the Omega on my short list!
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
So by rigid, I take it you mean no suspension. While a front and rear suspension do add comfort, they also add weight, complexity, and maintenance. I think Evelo's choice was highly influenced by their desire to produce a lighter weight and as maintenance free a bike as possible. I also own a Trek Allant which has a rigid fork and hard tail. It has a carbon fiber frame which does a pretty good job of absorbing higher frequency hits and vibrations. It also benefits hugely from the Kinekt seatpost and the Baramind Suspension Handlebar.
 

OnePutt

New Member
Region
USA
So by rigid, I take it you mean no suspension. While a front and rear suspension do add comfort, they also add weight, complexity, and maintenance. I think Evelo's choice was highly influenced by their desire to produce a lighter weight and as maintenance free a bike as possible. I also own a Trek Allant which has a rigid fork and hard tail. It has a carbon fiber frame which does a pretty good job of absorbing higher frequency hits and vibrations. It also benefits hugely from the Kinekt seatpost and the Baramind Suspension Handlebar.
Yes, I mean no suspension. It seems like front and rear suspension is found on mountain bikes designed for aggressive riding, but I thought an ebike would have front suspension. I'm 190# and 74, so I'm looking for a comfortable ride and thinking of the safety as well. I've ridden motorcycles my whole life, still ride a HD Street Glide, so I know what you mean about watching the road, and being a defensive driver. I do ride a 10 y.o. mountain hybrid non electric bike with fork suspension and they do help with some of the bumps. I hope someone puts out a video review of the Omega, showing it in action.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Yes, I mean no suspension. It seems like front and rear suspension is found on mountain bikes designed for aggressive riding, but I thought an ebike would have front suspension. I'm 190# and 74, so I'm looking for a comfortable ride and thinking of the safety as well. I've ridden motorcycles my whole life, still ride a HD Street Glide, so I know what you mean about watching the road, and being a defensive driver. I do ride a 10 y.o. mountain hybrid non electric bike with fork suspension and they do help with some of the bumps. I hope someone puts out a video review of the Omega, showing it in action.
Have you checked out the Evelo Atlas? Just sorting a new one out now and pretty impressed for my purposes....

As far as full suspension (front and rear), I think you're going to see more of those in off road use where it's easier to justify the weight and complexity as @Alaskan mentioned.
 

TForan52

Active Member
Region
USA
I really don’t see the point of suspension for street ridden bikes unless your roads are really bad.
 

Ebiker33

Well-Known Member
My new Omega was delivered on June 22. It arrived in good condition with a minor paint scratch on the front wheel, something easily fixed with some matt black Testors model paint. It was an easy assembly, just mounting the handlebar, with stem attached, to the steering tube and installing the front wheel. I checked all key fasteners on brakes and drive train and confirmed that all was installed to proper torque specs.

I did order the bike with the extra battery and rack, which is supposed to land in Tacoma, WA on August 6 and should be sent out by mid August after clearing customs and arriving at the Seattle fulfillment warehouse. The bike is really a subtle stunner with its metallic, pearlescent white paint w/ smokey silver fork and accents. The paint is hard thick and appears to be very durable...only time will tell.

The lines are clean and simple, the layout of the cockpit is uncluttered with the wires, cables and hydraulic lines cleanly arranged and well managed. It appears that most cables coming out of the cockpit go to waterproof male/female plugs/joints prior to disappearing into the frame a thoughtful choice that allows the display, headlight, etc. to be swapped out simply by unplugging and dismounting with the need to run new wiring through the frame. Given its strong motor and large battery, it is somewhat of a wolf in sheep's clothing with rather subtle if not tame looks but dynamic ride performance. I made the following modifications and additions:
  • Ergon Biocork grips
  • Hammerhead Karoo 2 cycle computer with GPS mapping, customized display with hear rate,
  • Garmin cadence sensor on left crank
  • Accessory bar at the center of the handlebar
  • Sun Co. clip on thermometer
  • Quadlock phone mount
  • horn
  • Spurcycle bell
  • Knog PWR Trail light with 5,000MaH battery pack/phone charger
  • Kinekt spring loaded, 30 degree rise stem with stem cap computer mount
  • Kinekt seat suspension seat post
  • Selle Anatomica H2 leather saddle
  • Rack Time seatpost clamp rack
  • Rosewell 13L trunk bag with bright reflective piping and rain cover
  • Light and Motion Seca 1800 lumen headlight with three steady on light levels and a lower amperage daytime pulse mode
  • Vee Rubber 26x2.8 Speedster tires mounted tubeless
  • Busch & Muller rear view mirror
The bike is easy to access with its deep step through. The frame construction, buttressing and welding is very robust and there is no perceptible twist, frame instability or wobbling at higher speeds and moving through turns.
The motor is whisper quiet, in fact all I really hear is tire noise and the sound of the servo-motor in the hub interface changing drive ratios. I am avoiding using the word "gears" as there really are none in the Enviolo CVT. Getting accustomed to automatic shifting was quick and easy, really trusting it to be in the right ratio for the terrain has taken a bit more time but is done now. I have discovered that getting into the lowest ratio, while pushing hard up a hill does require a very brief easing up, if not a slight pause while pedaling. A brief hicup at top dead center with the cranks and then immediately resuming pedaling takes the pressure off and allows the servo to push the CVT into the lowest gear. It also helps to do this at speed around 22 mph where I ease up, get the pressure of the hub and lets the servo get into the highest ration for lower cadence at 25+mph. In between those two conditions it's fully automatic with no help required of the rider.

Mounting my phone near the right handlebar grip allows me to easily switch between Automatic and Manual mode. I was using manual far more at first but now that I have come to really trust the Automatiq function I rarely am in manual shift mode. Still it is nice to have the phone connected to the hub interface for information and easy switching. Once one learns to trust the shifter to keep you in the right ratio, the wireless, handlebar controller is almost never used.

All my prior bikes were Bosch powered with 250 watt motors peaking at 350 with 85 Newton meters of torque. This bike, with its Japanese Dapu, mid drive motor is 750 watts, peaking at 980 with 115 Newton meters of torque really has quite noticeably more zip and oomph, to use technical terms. 30% more torque makes a big difference in power, acceleration, hill climbing prowess, exertion level and power use. Despite its large 720 watt hour battery, it is easy, in the higher assist levels, to run yourself out of battery if you are not paying attention. Going up a 10% grade at 12 mph with a 190 lb rider on a 70 lb. bike, in PAS-5 is a perfect configuration for rapidly depleting a battery. However keeping the bike in PAS 2 on flat ground I am able to return home after 28 miles with 46% of the battery remaining. I will do some total range tests once I have battery #2 to bring along and I can ride #1 down to 10% remaining.

I have altered the ride position to suit my comfort zone which is to say the stem is at the bottom of the protruding steering tube with the spacers on top of it. Also the replacement Kinekt spring loaded suspension stem has way less rise than the stock one. Over all my riding position is more sporty and forward leaning, less upright than stock, which is how I like it, being used to riding a Cannondale Topstone Neo Carbon 3 a gravel ebike with drop handlebars. Completing the comfort profile is the Kinekt spring loaded, parallelogram seat post with a Selle Anatomica leather saddle with an open slot down the middle, which has been my saddle of choice on most of my ebikes for four years now.

I bought this bike to help me rehab from some health challenges that left me with less muscle mass and reduce lung capacity. As we live at the top of a 500 foot hill all rides end with a steep climb. Riding this bike has gotten me back on my other bikes for more vigorous, exercise based distance rides.

The Omega is perfectly suited as a daily automobile substitute, riding around town to appointments, using a rack mounted grocery basket or a trailer to pick up groceries, tools, haul stuff down to our boat, etc.

Nancy and I went on a 27 mile touring ride out into the river valley just north of town, cruising comfortably in PAS2 at around 20mph. If I want to go faster than that I up the PAS level, 22mph at PAS3, 25mph at pass 4 and 27 mph at PAS5 These are sustainable speeds on flat terrain, decent roads and at a comfortable cadence. The last of the ride, coming up the hill to our home, there are two blocks at 18-20% grades that I can easily pedal in PAS4 in not quite the lowest ratio, moving uphill at around 7-8 mph. Overall I find this a nicely designed, well thought out, robustly built bike.

Any review of an Evolo bike would not be complete without acknowledging the superb support Evelo provides. They have been designing and selling their bikes exclusively in the USA since 2012. The are assembled in Taiwan and distributed out of a warehouse near Seattle. When I have called their tech support team, about half the time I get right through to a person. If not I leave voice or email and someone friendly, courteous and smart gets back to me.
If there is any indication of a part being needed it is usually shipped out with tracking notification that same day. Being just 85 miles north of Seattle that means next day delivery...YMMV. This my first DTC (direct to consumer) ebike. Thus far my experience with the bike and the team standing solidly behind it has been outstanding.

This a fun bike to ride, good looking, solid, well made, with great support and well worth the premium price it commands.


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I went back to review Courts review of this Ebike right here on EBR, he liked it and it seemed to be solid choice.
4 years/20K warranty is probably one of the best coverages in the industry.
Would you buy it again now that you have put it through it's paces for a few months?
 

RMK!

Well-Known Member
My new Omega was delivered on June 22. It arrived in good condition with a minor paint scratch on the front wheel, something easily fixed with some matt black Testors model paint. It was an easy assembly, just mounting the handlebar, with stem attached, to the steering tube and installing the front wheel. I checked all key fasteners on brakes and drive train and confirmed that all was installed to proper torque specs.

I did order the bike with the extra battery and rack, which is supposed to land in Tacoma, WA on August 6 and should be sent out by mid August after clearing customs and arriving at the Seattle fulfillment warehouse. The bike is really a subtle stunner with its metallic, pearlescent white paint w/ smokey silver fork and accents. The paint is hard thick and appears to be very durable...only time will tell.

The lines are clean and simple, the layout of the cockpit is uncluttered with the wires, cables and hydraulic lines cleanly arranged and well managed. It appears that most cables coming out of the cockpit go to waterproof male/female plugs/joints prior to disappearing into the frame a thoughtful choice that allows the display, headlight, etc. to be swapped out simply by unplugging and dismounting with the need to run new wiring through the frame. Given its strong motor and large battery, it is somewhat of a wolf in sheep's clothing with rather subtle if not tame looks but dynamic ride performance. I made the following modifications and additions:
  • Ergon Biocork grips
  • Hammerhead Karoo 2 cycle computer with GPS mapping, customized display with hear rate,
  • Garmin cadence sensor on left crank
  • Accessory bar at the center of the handlebar
  • Sun Co. clip on thermometer
  • Quadlock phone mount
  • horn
  • Spurcycle bell
  • Knog PWR Trail light with 5,000MaH battery pack/phone charger
  • Kinekt spring loaded, 30 degree rise stem with stem cap computer mount
  • Kinekt seat suspension seat post
  • Selle Anatomica H2 leather saddle
  • Rack Time seatpost clamp rack
  • Rosewell 13L trunk bag with bright reflective piping and rain cover
  • Light and Motion Seca 1800 lumen headlight with three steady on light levels and a lower amperage daytime pulse mode
  • Vee Rubber 26x2.8 Speedster tires mounted tubeless
  • Busch & Muller rear view mirror
The bike is easy to access with its deep step through. The frame construction, buttressing and welding is very robust and there is no perceptible twist, frame instability or wobbling at higher speeds and moving through turns.
The motor is whisper quiet, in fact all I really hear is tire noise and the sound of the servo-motor in the hub interface changing drive ratios. I am avoiding using the word "gears" as there really are none in the Enviolo CVT. Getting accustomed to automatic shifting was quick and easy, really trusting it to be in the right ratio for the terrain has taken a bit more time but is done now. I have discovered that getting into the lowest ratio, while pushing hard up a hill does require a very brief easing up, if not a slight pause while pedaling. A brief hicup at top dead center with the cranks and then immediately resuming pedaling takes the pressure off and allows the servo to push the CVT into the lowest gear. It also helps to do this at speed around 22 mph where I ease up, get the pressure of the hub and lets the servo get into the highest ration for lower cadence at 25+mph. In between those two conditions it's fully automatic with no help required of the rider.

Mounting my phone near the right handlebar grip allows me to easily switch between Automatic and Manual mode. I was using manual far more at first but now that I have come to really trust the Automatiq function I rarely am in manual shift mode. Still it is nice to have the phone connected to the hub interface for information and easy switching. Once one learns to trust the shifter to keep you in the right ratio, the wireless, handlebar controller is almost never used.

All my prior bikes were Bosch powered with 250 watt motors peaking at 350 with 85 Newton meters of torque. This bike, with its Japanese Dapu, mid drive motor is 750 watts, peaking at 980 with 115 Newton meters of torque really has quite noticeably more zip and oomph, to use technical terms. 30% more torque makes a big difference in power, acceleration, hill climbing prowess, exertion level and power use. Despite its large 720 watt hour battery, it is easy, in the higher assist levels, to run yourself out of battery if you are not paying attention. Going up a 10% grade at 12 mph with a 190 lb rider on a 70 lb. bike, in PAS-5 is a perfect configuration for rapidly depleting a battery. However keeping the bike in PAS 2 on flat ground I am able to return home after 28 miles with 46% of the battery remaining. I will do some total range tests once I have battery #2 to bring along and I can ride #1 down to 10% remaining.

I have altered the ride position to suit my comfort zone which is to say the stem is at the bottom of the protruding steering tube with the spacers on top of it. Also the replacement Kinekt spring loaded suspension stem has way less rise than the stock one. Over all my riding position is more sporty and forward leaning, less upright than stock, which is how I like it, being used to riding a Cannondale Topstone Neo Carbon 3 a gravel ebike with drop handlebars. Completing the comfort profile is the Kinekt spring loaded, parallelogram seat post with a Selle Anatomica leather saddle with an open slot down the middle, which has been my saddle of choice on most of my ebikes for four years now.

I bought this bike to help me rehab from some health challenges that left me with less muscle mass and reduce lung capacity. As we live at the top of a 500 foot hill all rides end with a steep climb. Riding this bike has gotten me back on my other bikes for more vigorous, exercise based distance rides.

The Omega is perfectly suited as a daily automobile substitute, riding around town to appointments, using a rack mounted grocery basket or a trailer to pick up groceries, tools, haul stuff down to our boat, etc.

Nancy and I went on a 27 mile touring ride out into the river valley just north of town, cruising comfortably in PAS2 at around 20mph. If I want to go faster than that I up the PAS level, 22mph at PAS3, 25mph at pass 4 and 27 mph at PAS5 These are sustainable speeds on flat terrain, decent roads and at a comfortable cadence. The last of the ride, coming up the hill to our home, there are two blocks at 18-20% grades that I can easily pedal in PAS4 in not quite the lowest ratio, moving uphill at around 7-8 mph. Overall I find this a nicely designed, well thought out, robustly built bike.

Any review of an Evolo bike would not be complete without acknowledging the superb support Evelo provides. They have been designing and selling their bikes exclusively in the USA since 2012. The are assembled in Taiwan and distributed out of a warehouse near Seattle. When I have called their tech support team, about half the time I get right through to a person. If not I leave voice or email and someone friendly, courteous and smart gets back to me.
If there is any indication of a part being needed it is usually shipped out with tracking notification that same day. Being just 85 miles north of Seattle that means next day delivery...YMMV. This my first DTC (direct to consumer) ebike. Thus far my experience with the bike and the team standing solidly behind it has been outstanding.

This a fun bike to ride, good looking, solid, well made, with great support and well worth the premium price it commands.


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Great review, thanks for all the information. I wanted this bike for my wife I have the Enviolo Automatiq on another ebike (Serial 1 Rush Cty S) and it is a great drivetrain. She has ridden my Serial 1 and although it is too big for her (it's an XL) she loved the bike in general and especially the Automatiq. She insists on having a throttle even though she rarely uses it but hey ...

Anyway, when I purchased her first ebike (2020 Blix Aveny) I honestly though she would seldom if ever ride it. 4000 miles later, ebike riding is one of her favorite pastimes but the Aveny is a little lacking in current tech and since she is riding a good amount and loving it, I wanted to get her a new bike. I spoke with Evelo this morning and blind placed an order. After watching Courts review here and reading your review comments, I'm very happy I did. I know she will love the bike and someone will get a nice Aveny as a result.

BTW, any real world mileage data for the single battery Omega would be appreciated.
 
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RMK!

Well-Known Member
One more BTW, they are running a special right now on the Omega extra battery and rack combo. It's $400 which is 50% off the regular price. That is a permanent cure for range anxiety and a no-brainer if there ever was one ...
 

PoconoJoe

Member
My new Omega was delivered on June 22. It arrived in good condition with a minor paint scratch on the front wheel, something easily fixed with some matt black Testors model paint. It was an easy assembly, just mounting the handlebar, with stem attached, to the steering tube and installing the front wheel. I checked all key fasteners on brakes and drive train and confirmed that all was installed to proper torque specs.

I did order the bike with the extra battery and rack, which is supposed to land in Tacoma, WA on August 6 and should be sent out by mid August after clearing customs and arriving at the Seattle fulfillment warehouse. The bike is really a subtle stunner with its metallic, pearlescent white paint w/ smokey silver fork and accents. The paint is hard thick and appears to be very durable...only time will tell.

The lines are clean and simple, the layout of the cockpit is uncluttered with the wires, cables and hydraulic lines cleanly arranged and well managed. It appears that most cables coming out of the cockpit go to waterproof male/female plugs/joints prior to disappearing into the frame a thoughtful choice that allows the display, headlight, etc. to be swapped out simply by unplugging and dismounting with the need to run new wiring through the frame. Given its strong motor and large battery, it is somewhat of a wolf in sheep's clothing with rather subtle if not tame looks but dynamic ride performance. I made the following modifications and additions:
  • Ergon Biocork grips
  • Hammerhead Karoo 2 cycle computer with GPS mapping, customized display with hear rate,
  • Garmin cadence sensor on left crank
  • Accessory bar at the center of the handlebar
  • Sun Co. clip on thermometer
  • Quadlock phone mount
  • horn
  • Spurcycle bell
  • Knog PWR Trail light with 5,000MaH battery pack/phone charger
  • Kinekt spring loaded, 30 degree rise stem with stem cap computer mount
  • Kinekt seat suspension seat post
  • Selle Anatomica H2 leather saddle
  • Rack Time seatpost clamp rack
  • Rosewell 13L trunk bag with bright reflective piping and rain cover
  • Light and Motion Seca 1800 lumen headlight with three steady on light levels and a lower amperage daytime pulse mode
  • Vee Rubber 26x2.8 Speedster tires mounted tubeless
  • Busch & Muller rear view mirror
The bike is easy to access with its deep step through. The frame construction, buttressing and welding is very robust and there is no perceptible twist, frame instability or wobbling at higher speeds and moving through turns.
The motor is whisper quiet, in fact all I really hear is tire noise and the sound of the servo-motor in the hub interface changing drive ratios. I am avoiding using the word "gears" as there really are none in the Enviolo CVT. Getting accustomed to automatic shifting was quick and easy, really trusting it to be in the right ratio for the terrain has taken a bit more time but is done now. I have discovered that getting into the lowest ratio, while pushing hard up a hill does require a very brief easing up, if not a slight pause while pedaling. A brief hicup at top dead center with the cranks and then immediately resuming pedaling takes the pressure off and allows the servo to push the CVT into the lowest gear. It also helps to do this at speed around 22 mph where I ease up, get the pressure of the hub and lets the servo get into the highest ration for lower cadence at 25+mph. In between those two conditions it's fully automatic with no help required of the rider.

Mounting my phone near the right handlebar grip allows me to easily switch between Automatic and Manual mode. I was using manual far more at first but now that I have come to really trust the Automatiq function I rarely am in manual shift mode. Still it is nice to have the phone connected to the hub interface for information and easy switching. Once one learns to trust the shifter to keep you in the right ratio, the wireless, handlebar controller is almost never used.

All my prior bikes were Bosch powered with 250 watt motors peaking at 350 with 85 Newton meters of torque. This bike, with its Japanese Dapu, mid drive motor is 750 watts, peaking at 980 with 115 Newton meters of torque really has quite noticeably more zip and oomph, to use technical terms. 30% more torque makes a big difference in power, acceleration, hill climbing prowess, exertion level and power use. Despite its large 720 watt hour battery, it is easy, in the higher assist levels, to run yourself out of battery if you are not paying attention. Going up a 10% grade at 12 mph with a 190 lb rider on a 70 lb. bike, in PAS-5 is a perfect configuration for rapidly depleting a battery. However keeping the bike in PAS 2 on flat ground I am able to return home after 28 miles with 46% of the battery remaining. I will do some total range tests once I have battery #2 to bring along and I can ride #1 down to 10% remaining.

I have altered the ride position to suit my comfort zone which is to say the stem is at the bottom of the protruding steering tube with the spacers on top of it. Also the replacement Kinekt spring loaded suspension stem has way less rise than the stock one. Over all my riding position is more sporty and forward leaning, less upright than stock, which is how I like it, being used to riding a Cannondale Topstone Neo Carbon 3 a gravel ebike with drop handlebars. Completing the comfort profile is the Kinekt spring loaded, parallelogram seat post with a Selle Anatomica leather saddle with an open slot down the middle, which has been my saddle of choice on most of my ebikes for four years now.

I bought this bike to help me rehab from some health challenges that left me with less muscle mass and reduce lung capacity. As we live at the top of a 500 foot hill all rides end with a steep climb. Riding this bike has gotten me back on my other bikes for more vigorous, exercise based distance rides.

The Omega is perfectly suited as a daily automobile substitute, riding around town to appointments, using a rack mounted grocery basket or a trailer to pick up groceries, tools, haul stuff down to our boat, etc.

Nancy and I went on a 27 mile touring ride out into the river valley just north of town, cruising comfortably in PAS2 at around 20mph. If I want to go faster than that I up the PAS level, 22mph at PAS3, 25mph at pass 4 and 27 mph at PAS5 These are sustainable speeds on flat terrain, decent roads and at a comfortable cadence. The last of the ride, coming up the hill to our home, there are two blocks at 18-20% grades that I can easily pedal in PAS4 in not quite the lowest ratio, moving uphill at around 7-8 mph. Overall I find this a nicely designed, well thought out, robustly built bike.

Any review of an Evolo bike would not be complete without acknowledging the superb support Evelo provides. They have been designing and selling their bikes exclusively in the USA since 2012. The are assembled in Taiwan and distributed out of a warehouse near Seattle. When I have called their tech support team, about half the time I get right through to a person. If not I leave voice or email and someone friendly, courteous and smart gets back to me.
If there is any indication of a part being needed it is usually shipped out with tracking notification that same day. Being just 85 miles north of Seattle that means next day delivery...YMMV. This my first DTC (direct to consumer) ebike. Thus far my experience with the bike and the team standing solidly behind it has been outstanding.

This a fun bike to ride, good looking, solid, well made, with great support and well worth the premium price it commands.


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I'm about to order an Omega. How easy or difficult is it to remove/install the main battery? Do you need the key to install or can you just snap it in place?

Thanks,Joe