Extending Range on Aventon Level with Portable Power Station and Folding Solar Suitcase

David S

New Member
Region
USA
Hello. First time post here. I researched previous posts and did not find a scenario exactly like this: I wanted take my Aventon Level to remote locations - where I would not have access to a reliable source of fixed power. Therefore, I purchased a Jackery 240 (delivering 200 usable watt hours of power) power station and a Renogy 50 watt solar suitcase. The total setup will weigh a total of 5.5 kilograms / 12.2 pounds. The Jackery’s capacity is only 1/3 of the 672 watt hour / 48 volt Aventon battery, however, my goal is two-fold:
1) While moving (and throughout the day), utilize the solar panel to charge the Jackery power station to power/connect the Aventon’s 3AH AC charger back to the e-bike battery.
2) Having the flexible option to use a power station and solar for non-biking uses.

Assumptions:
I calculated the following:
a) Base battery: 672 watt hours for = 50 miles (13.4 watts/mile)
- already tested this
b) Jackery 240: 200 usable watt hours = 15 miles
c) 50 watt solar panel: Delivering 50 watts per hour over 9 hours at 60% efficiency = 20 miles

Objective:
Increase the base range from 50 miles to 85 miles. To achieve these numbers, I’ll have to hypermile; high tire pressure, pedal to PAS 1, self-power up hills, and keep speeds to between 12 and 15 mph.

Questions:
1) Is this even possible / worth it?
2) Are my assumptions reasonable - to increase range by 35 miles?
3) Would the bike’s controller and BMS allow for onboard solar charging?
4) If so, am I potentially shortening the life of the battery / risking a potentially unsafe high temperature event; thereby requiring a battery temperature monitoring solution?

I was just fascinated by the idea of doing a project like this with low cost off-the-shelf / plug-and-play components.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Hello. First time post here. I researched previous posts and did not find a scenario exactly like this: I wanted take my Aventon Level to remote locations - where I would not have access to a reliable source of fixed power. Therefore, I purchased a Jackery 240 (delivering 200 usable watt hours of power) power station and a Renogy 50 watt solar suitcase. The total setup will weigh a total of 5.5 kilograms / 12.2 pounds. The Jackery’s capacity is only 1/3 of the 672 watt hour / 48 volt Aventon battery, however, my goal is two-fold:
1) While moving (and throughout the day), utilize the solar panel to charge the Jackery power station to power/connect the Aventon’s 3AH AC charger back to the e-bike battery.
2) Having the flexible option to use a power station and solar for non-biking uses.

Assumptions:
I calculated the following:
a) Base battery: 672 watt hours for = 50 miles (13.4 watts/mile)
- already tested this
b) Jackery 240: 200 usable watt hours = 15 miles
c) 50 watt solar panel: Delivering 50 watts per hour over 9 hours at 60% efficiency = 20 miles

Objective:
Increase the base range from 50 miles to 85 miles. To achieve these numbers, I’ll have to hypermile; high tire pressure, pedal to PAS 1, self-power up hills, and keep speeds to between 12 and 15 mph.

Questions:
1) Is this even possible / worth it?
2) Are my assumptions reasonable - to increase range by 35 miles?
3) Would the bike’s controller and BMS allow for onboard solar charging?
4) If so, am I potentially shortening the life of the battery / risking a potentially unsafe high temperature event; thereby requiring a battery temperature monitoring solution?

I was just fascinated by the idea of doing a project like this with low cost off-the-shelf / plug-and-play components.
I don't think it's worth it.

You want to be hauling around a solar panel, battery charger and power pack?

Wouldn't it be easier (and cheaper) to carry an extra battery? 🤔
 

K PierreR

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
A 50 watt solar panel will only deliver 50 watts at high noon in clear air in the tropics. Real world numbers in the mid latitudes is 11-19% but that includes night time hours. double that for daylight or 22-38% This is panel output. There is also considerable power loss to charging your batteries. In the end, you results are likely to be very disappointing. A second battery is the way to go. Solar is pretty useless except for charging electronics like cell phones.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
A 50 watt solar panel will only deliver 50 watts at high noon in clear air in the tropics. Real world numbers in the mid latitudes is 11-19% but that includes night time hours. double that for daylight or 22-38% This is panel output. There is also considerable power loss to charging your batteries. In the end, you results are likely to be very disappointing. A second battery is the way to go. Solar is pretty useless except for charging electronics like cell phones.
Yeah.. and when the weather gets cloudy, you're basically carrying excessive weight that only decreases your range, which defeats the purpose.
 

alphacarina

Member
Region
USA
A 50 watt solar panel will only deliver 50 watts at high noon in clear air in the tropics.
. . . . and only then if the panel is kept perpendicular to the sun's rays at all times. Solar panel advertised outputs are notoriously optimistic and seldom achievable in the real world. For size, weight and expected range, it's pretty hard to beat just carrying a second battery

Don
 

opimax

Well-Known Member
is your goal to extend range or charge by solar? Currently hard to do both at once. you can charge by solar on a spare battery and rotate for solar charging or chage the spare battery at night and take it with you for range . Either way a spare battery currently makes the most sense to me. In my way of thinking and depending on your needs/wants consider a spare battery part of the cost of owning an ebike with range you are looking for.