Falco eDrive: the e-bike system that doubles as an indoor trainer

Ann M.

Well-Known Member
BionX systems with their programmable regen and assist work the same way, as would any ebike where you can select regen levels. Personally, I prefer a good ride through some hills for a workout but if you're stuck indoors from rough weather the regen trainer would be an option :D
 

Alan Acock

Member
After watching the "development" of the Copenhagen Wheel for several years where they took orders but didn't fill them, it is good to see an alternative. This is a lot less expensive than buying a new e-bike. I don't know how they could possibly have 100 mile range.
 

Rakesh Dhawan

New Member
Regen functionality is not equivalent to indoor training. When we refer to indoor training, we refer to the same level of training as done by serious cyclists using trainers such as TACX, BKool, Wahoo etc. and being able to connect with virtual training apps such as Zwift and have access to serious training tools such as TrainerRoad. Falco brings to you the same tools in an eBike as used by serious cyclists. That is Falco eDrive - World's First Indoor/Outdoor eBike. Please do not mistake it with regen capability of direct drive. If you have tried any kind of indoor training with regen, you will find out fairly quickly that it is completely useless for indoor training.
 

Rakesh Dhawan

New Member
The 100-mile range is achievable at level 1 because of the high efficiency of the 5-phase technology. Obviously, the range is affected by many factors but the range number can be reproduced quite easily, and under non-ideal conditions, Trike riders have reported range numbers close to 80 miles repeatedly.
 

Trail Cruiser

Well-Known Member
The 100-mile range is achievable at level 1 because of the high efficiency of the 5-phase technology. Obviously, the range is affected by many factors but the range number can be reproduced quite easily, and under non-ideal conditions, Trike riders have reported range numbers close to 80 miles repeatedly.
Hi Rakesh, 100 miles is very impressive for a 400 wh battery. That is a whooping 4 wh/mile power consumption, which is unheard of. Typically, riders average 16-20 wh/mile but usually, the advertised range is about 8-10 wh/mile.

So a 400wh battery usually has an advertised range of 40-50 mile but riders typically gets 20-25 miles.

An 800wh battery has an advertised range of 80-100 mile but riders typically gets 40-50 miles, and so on...

Your claim needs to be validated and if you have videos and other testimonies, that would greatly help your business big time.

More power to you!
 
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Trail Cruiser

Well-Known Member
Hello Mark,

We always encourage strong validation. Here is a guy who get 75 miles to a charge in level 3 regularly.
http://www.electricbicycleworld.com...co-equipped-recumbent-trike-by-wally-hertler/
Best,
Rakesh
Very impressive! Real-world 70-80 miles in one charge on a 400 wh battery! I guess it would be fun and also a good exposure to sponsor an ebike tour where anybody can bring their ebikes and ride on predetermined stops and route to compare how far their batteries can power the different brands of bikes.

Addendum:
He had three (3) batteries with him?
"DAY THIRTEEN - The ride from Williamsport to Pottsville was by far the toughest so far, with several steep mountain climbs and numerous shorter climbs even before we reached the first mountain at Catawissa. I needed all three of my batteries. I was very glad to reach the Pottsville Ramada Inn. Since the trike didn’t fit in the elevator I had to store it in an alcove next to the elevator. [Day 13: 80 miles, 5843 ft.]"
 
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Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
Great product!
Rakesh is very particular about the quality and reliability of his products. He also offers 5 year warranty on the drive system which is one of the best.
I am not sure how could anyone get 100 miles of range even in Level 1 (marketing blurb perhaps) but it does look like a neatly designed product.

I wonder why they chose dropbar version instead of a regular commuter type styling. An upright geometry is what most customers prefer and having additional features like lighting, fenders and rack would be very useful too.
 

DougcJohn

New Member
Very impressive! Real-world 70-80 miles in one charge on a 400 wh battery! I guess it would be fun and also a good exposure to sponsor an ebike tour where anybody can bring their ebikes and ride on predetermined stops and route to compare how far their batteries can power the different brands of bikes.

Addendum:
He had three (3) batteries with him?
"DAY THIRTEEN - The ride from Williamsport to Pottsville was by far the toughest so far, with several steep mountain climbs and numerous shorter climbs even before we reached the first mountain at Catawissa. I needed all three of my batteries. I was very glad to reach the Pottsville Ramada Inn. Since the trike didn’t fit in the elevator I had to store it in an alcove next to the elevator. [Day 13: 80 miles, 5843 ft.]"

The range is a major factor for me too... the linked story is very impressive, both the endurance of the Rider (group) to ride avg 70 per day with 3000-6000 ft climbs and for the Falcon system. The other Riders without electric motors (not indicated) to climb 3000-6000 per day and 70 mile daily avg is extremely impressive for young Riders; the photos indicate these were a senior Riders! Multiple batteries used, but doesn't the extreme footage in climbs also play a major factor in battery consumption. I'd like to read some reports for more avg 800-2000 ft climb, 50-100 mile rides. What mileage is obtained per single battery on normal rides.
 

Nirmala

Active Member
I have seen the 100 mile range figure reported on the internet for this system (http://www.treehugger.com/bikes/falco-edrive-bike.html ). I sincerely doubt that anyone is seeing actual numbers like that with a 400 wh battery. Until Falco provides some actual documentation that shows their system is approximately 3 times as efficient as all of the other ebike systems out there, I can only see it as an extreme case of exaggeration, which unfortunately is not unheard of from ebike manufacturers.