Faraday Creates Lower-Priced Model

J.R.

Well-Known Member
"By changing a few components, Faraday has created an eBike that costs $2,800"

I like this new model much better than the original model, I couldn't get past those bamboo fenders on the original. The color is much better than the original milk-toast cream. At $2800 it would be a bargain if they could jam a few more battery cells into the frame. Beautiful bike though!

faraday-porteur-s-ebike.png faraday-porteur-s-stock-back.jpg faraday-porteur-s-stock-front.jpg
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
I've gone back to the picture of this bike several times, it sure is pretty. I would love to have unlimited funds, I would buy this bike just for Sunday afternoons. As it is it would be so impractical for the kind of riding I do.
 

Court

Administrator
Staff member
Great find @J.R.! I just finished my review of the Porteur S, loved the bike... definitely appreciate the lower price and the new slate grey color but I know what you mean about riding styles and limited funds :)

I was visiting San Francisco and hit the New Wheel and Motostrano as well as Faraday headquarters where Adam Vollmer (the founder) showed me around their new space, check it out:

 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Great find @J.R.! I just finished my review of the Porteur S, loved the bike... definitely appreciate the lower price and the new slate grey color but I know what you mean about riding styles and limited funds :)
This new S model is like the perfect "weekend car"! If I rode in a city or town, I'd have this and a bike for ripping up commutes and trails.
 

Shaun

New Member
@Prof_Stack , I saw and test rode one in Greenville, SC at The eBicycle Store downtown. Ultimately I preferred the higher spec'd Porteur and bought it as opposed to the Porteur S. The ride was similar with both but I wasn't really a fan of the twist shifter and more limited gear range of the Porteur S. It did, however, look awesome in grey!
 

JoePah

Well-Known Member
I will never understand the attraction of a $3500 Chrome Moly bike with mechanical brakes, a 250 Wh battery and a 250W motor!

And how do you replace the battery if you want to extend the range?
 

Shaun

New Member
I will never understand the attraction of a $3500 Chrome Moly bike with mechanical brakes, a 250 Wh battery and a 250W motor!

And how do you replace the battery if you want to extend the range?
@JoePah , I agree that the bike is probably overpriced but at least for me but I wanted a bike first and foremost with the ebike/motor being a secondary feature in terms of importance to me. I did a lot of research/reading on other forums on the components of the Faraday... The closest "regular" bike I could find in terms of components was a Cannondale Bad Boy 1 as it has the Shimano Alfine 8 speed internally geared hub (but with a chain drive vs the gates carbon belt of the Faraday Porteur) and hydraulic disc brakes... that bike is $1700. At a little more than double the cost, I figured the additional cost of the batteries+motor+carbon belt and additional engineering/design of the Faraday was worth it and it seemed to be a fair price given the comparisons I did.

Anyway, as for the mechanical brakes, yes, they could have put on hydraulic brakes but from what I've read on other forums about mechanical vs hydraulic people seem to be 50/50 on what they like more. So far the mechanical brakes haven't been a problem for me. Also, I don't claim to be an expert but it would seem that mechanical would be slightly easier to maintain given that it doesn't have the oils/etc of a hydraulic system.

As for the chromoly frame, again I don't claim to be an expert but it seems that from what I've read people seem to like the chromoly frames due to the absorption of shocks/etc with bumps in the road. From my riding so far on streets and trails with the Faraday, I'd say that the ride is pretty smooth compared to my old road bike.

From what I've read about the battery, it is replaceable as you can remove it from the down tube. The Faraday website has an FAQ that says the battery could be replaced by any bike shop (at a cost of roughly $400 for a new battery)... I'd be willing to guess that it's not a complex process to remove/replace the battery. Another thing I like about the battery being in the down tube is that it's out of sight so that for the most part the bike looks like a regular bike. That being said, I do hope that in the future if and when battery/motor technology becomes better and more efficient that Faraday would offer upgrade kits to the bike given how expensive the bike is in the first place.

Anyway, I test rode an A2B, Kalkoff, and Faraday (Porteur and Porteur S) at my local ebike shop and the Faraday won for me primarily because the ride was "normal" when the motor wasn't turned on and I liked the way it looked compared to the other bikes. The other bikes were just too big and heavy to make it enjoyable with the motor turned off and the other bikes screamed EBIKE whereas the Faraday just looked like a nice commuter.

In any case, the other day I rode a paved trail about 20 miles with the Faraday with my kid in a Thule Ridealong and for the most part I did not have the motor engaged as I didn't really need it except for a few extended climbs. When I finished my ride I had more than 3/4 battery left according to the display read out on the bike. I'm not sure I could have done the same ride on the other bikes I test rode since those bikes were much larger/heavier than the Faraday...

Anyway, I don't work for Faraday but am a new owner. I am, of course, biased to the Faraday given that I just dropped $$$ on it but just wanted to share my thoughts on the bike and why there might be an attraction to such a bike vs the majority of other ebikes out there.
 
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Tom6680

New Member
@JoePah , I agree that the bike is probably overpriced but at least for me but I wanted a bike first and foremost with the ebike/motor being a secondary feature in terms of importance to me. I did a lot of research/reading on other forums on the components of the Faraday... The closest "regular" bike I could find in terms of components was a Cannondale Bad Boy 1 as is has the Shimano Alfine 8 speed internally geared hub (but with a chain drive vs the gates carbon belt of the Faraday Porteur) and hydraulic disc brakes... that bike is $1700. At a little more than double the cost, I figured the additional cost of the batteries+motor+carbon belt and additional engineering/design of the Faraday was worth it and it seemed to be a fair price given the comparisons I did.

Anyway, as for the mechanical brakes, yes, they could have put on hydraulic brakes but from what I've read on other forums about mechanical vs hydraulic people seem to be 50/50 on what they like more. So far the mechanical brakes haven't been a problem for me. Also, I don't claim to be an expert but it would seem that mechanical would be slightly easier to maintain given that it doesn't have the oils/etc of a hydraulic system.

As for the chromoly frame, again I don't claim to be an expert but it seems that from what I've read people seem to like the chromoly frames due to the absorption of shocks/etc with bumps in the road. From my riding so far on streets and trails with the Faraday, I'd say that the ride is pretty smooth compared to my old road bike.

From what I've read about the battery, it is replaceable as you can remove it from the down tube. The Faraday website has an FAQ that says the battery could be replaced by any bike shop (at a cost of roughly $400 for a new battery)... I'd be willing to guess that it's not a complex process to remove/replace the battery. Another thing I like about the battery being in the down tube is that it's out of sight so that for the most part the bike looks like a regular bike. That being said, I do hope that in the future if and when battery/motor technology becomes better and more efficient that Faraday would offer upgrade kits to the bike given how expensive the bike is in the first place.

Anyway, I test rode an A2B, Kalkoff, and Faraday (Porteur and Porteur S) at my local ebike shop and the Faraday won for me primarily because the ride was "normal" when the motor wasn't turned on and I liked the way it looked compared to the other bikes. The other bikes were just too big and heavy to make it enjoyable with the motor turned off and the other bikes screamed EBIKE whereas the Faraday just looked like a nice commuter.

In any case, the other day I rode a paved trail about 20 miles with the Faraday with my kid in a Thule Ridealong and for the most part I did not have the motor engaged as I didn't really need it except for a few extended climbs. When I finished my ride I had more than 3/4 battery left according to the display read out on the bike. I'm not sure I could have done the same ride on the other bikes I test rode since those bikes were much larger/heavier than the Faraday...

Anyway, I don't work for Faraday but am a new owner. I am, of course, biased to the Faraday given that I just dropped $$$ on it but just wanted to share my thoughts on the bike and why there might be an attraction to such a bike vs the majority of other ebikes out there.
 

Tom6680

New Member
I totally agree, just got my Faraday S because it is a bike FIRST. I live in Monterey and rode the hilly bay bike trail for 20 miles and the e-ink says I have 50% battery left. I am 73 and I use the motor just for help on the hills. I can use the lowest support for ascents up to 5%, over that I use the boost.
LOVE the Faraday!!!!