FASST Flexx Bars - Alternative to suspension stems?

theemartymac

Well-Known Member
So I stumbled across these and found them interesting. I have no first hand knowledge, so wondering if anyone else has seen or tested them? They look like they might be a potential alternative to traditional suspension stems for gravel and trail riders, and while perhaps a little costly, they look to be about the same cost as a low-mid-range front suspension fork. They ship with 4 different elastomers for adjusting the rate, and they have DH, MTB, and Ebike models.

The YouTube video review is somewhat encouraging although tested in a pretty serious MTB environment..



I have also found the 12 degree back sweep to be pretty comfortable for those who don't want to completely lose the traditional MTB riding position.

And a print review from another source with parts photos.

 
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AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
I'm wondering what happens when you go to yank up on the front end as you approach a curb that needs to be climbed? Or am I the only one that does that?
 

Catalyzt

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I saw those, too, and wondered about them. Not as heavy as front shocks, I bet. Might be an option for my Trek Kit Bike.

Yes, please, if anyone has any experience with them, post back. The kit bike has a Girvin Flexstem, which helps... but not quite enough.
 

theemartymac

Well-Known Member
I'm wondering what happens when you go to yank up on the front end as you approach a curb that needs to be climbed? Or am I the only one that does that?
I tend to use the L press technique for that which involves loading the tires and suspension and then letting it do the work so I don't have to pull up on the bars. You do shift your weight backwards, but the bar hinge looks like it would remain rigid in that direction. Same technique for downhill drops and jumps. When you pull hard on your bars, you have more likelihood of inadvertently altering the balance and steering direction and that is bad news in dynamic terrain.


And if you want a full bunny hop for parallel curb hops and obstacle avoidance, here is the other half of that technique.


And the tester does reference that in the FASST test video, and states there was no negative feedback when intentionally loading the front end.