Fat bikes; Monsters? Mobile couches? Or a necessary tool?

Haystacks

Member
There is this whole rhetoric that those of us that use fat bikes are somehow lesser than the posers, you know the ones who spend a fortune on mountain bikes then ride up and down smooth roads or cruise promenades, you know, the types whose bikes only see rough terrain as they pass through it attached to the back of a car, you know, the types who sneer at the big knobblies and never really see the need for chunky tyres, yeah those types.

Well i'm not one of those, a fat bike is a necessity where i live if you want to enjoy our beautiful back garden, you see there is nothing but wild rugged moorland all the way to Scotland, here if your bike breaks, it's a long potentially dangerous walk home, here if you have an accident theres a good possibility mountain rescue are bringing you home in a body bag, here your status symbol wouldn't cut the mustard, you wouldn't even get up the foothills. Funnily enough the only pictures of up here on google maps is from a group of mountain bikers and in both of them the reason they had stopped was to fix their bikes.

And this is where the justifiable anger rose the other night on the "Apples to Apples? Bosch vs. Bafang Ultra" thread, certain members trying to sow the notion that fatbike users are lazy couch potatoes riding silly bikes. When i go for a ride i take a survival kit, first aid kit, waterproofs and i am generally wearing thermals; yes even in summer. You? Probably some of those sachets of instant energy is the closest you'll get. When i go for a ride, if solo, people are informed of where i am going and when i expect to be back, they have access to the GPS on my phone and watch in case i don't make it back, you?

So heres a little pictorial of a small route i regularly take if i am out for a short ride, some of it is extremely technical and your vado/como/whatever wouldn't make it and i doubt your abilities would allow you to make it. Off road motorbike skills come in handy and electric fatbikes open up this ground to us in a quieter more eco friendly manner.

First of all here is my deeply offensive monster. I've recently renamed it 'Maschine' (yes i know thats not how you spell machine in english) This picture was taken where it starts to get gnarly.

20200924_133321.jpg


Now we start to move into more difficult terrain. These pictures showing the climbs are taken with the phone perfectly vertical.

20200924_174001.jpg


Now we start to move into the challenging aspects of this route, once again taken perfectly vertical.

20200924_171226.jpg


This bits a killer

20200924_171100.jpg


20200924_171053.jpg
20200924_172304.jpg


Once you leave the foothills and the moorland opens up it makes the slog worth it

20200924_172949.jpg
20200924_172956.jpg
download_20200924_182209.jpg
20200924_133758.jpg


Time to start the descent.

download_20200924_182149.jpg


So are fat bikes monsters? Are they mobile couches for couch potatoes? Or can they be a necessity? I know where i stand, you?
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
I think it depends on where and how you use it though right? you have to depend on the throttle or lots of power to become a mobile couch potato. plus riding on the road or easy paths where those fat tires are just boat anchors. If I got to ride there I would buy a fat ebike too.
 

John Thompson

Active Member
Gorgeous pix. As the starter of the thread in question, I feel your pain. I opted for a 3" wheelset on my bike instead of the full 4" fatties but we are birds of a feather.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I wouldn't be taking a bike on those trails instead a KTM 250 and blat blat blat over those rocks and stones. Maybe a Camelpak and a couple of energy bars...
 

Haystacks

Member
I wouldn't be taking a bike on those trails instead a KTM 250 and blat blat blat over those rocks and stones. Maybe a Camelpak and a couple of energy bars...

Police would chase you, catch you and confiscate your bike, i kid you not lol.
 

Haystacks

Member
Honestly, they would catch you, its their job, they ride the moors in teams and take you down anyway they can, whether its kicking you off, blocking your path or whatever they don't give a s*it. This used to be an area that pro trials bike guys trained, they don't anymore lol.
 

Haystacks

Member

I started reading that at the time and i'm not sure if its that people just dont get it or dont want to get it. It comes down to two things really, firstly whatever floats your boat and secondly and most importantly for me it opens up territory that most MTBs and eMTBs couldnt safely access, once you get on the tops and the landscape opens up the trails perversely become easier, less rugged and also more beautiful, sometimes it feels like your on top of the world and the only person that has ever been there.

And yes seeing those pics has made me resolute to take more, to stop more, take it all in and capture the essence of this wild place i take for granted.
 

CityExplorer

Well-Known Member
I started reading that at the time and i'm not sure if its that people just dont get it or dont want to get it. It comes down to two things really, firstly whatever floats your boat and secondly and most importantly for me it opens up territory that most MTBs and eMTBs couldnt safely access, once you get on the tops and the landscape opens up the trails perversely become easier, less rugged and also more beautiful, sometimes it feels like your on top of the world and the only person that has ever been there.

And yes seeing those pics has made me resolute to take more, to stop more, take it all in and capture the essence of this wild place i take for granted.
Keep going. My 1.95" tires need replacing on my other bike, and the bike needs a couple other tune-up for a long trip, so I've been using my Fat Tire bike for touring. Working better that I ever would have expected, and yes terrain has a lot to do with it. Went down a sandy ATV trail maintained by an ATV club a few weeks ago (18mi, 13mi sand) that is "not recommended for any bicycles". It was fun and also as important not busy at all. Broke my personal distance record twice and now its over 100mi (169km) all on a fat bike. My next bike will likely not have 4" tires because I've got one of those, but absolutely no regrets. Maybe the largest surprise, is other than road noise I don't really see a big disadvantage for the street on an e-bike. And the noise of course is really related to the tread, not the width.

So definitely, try it, if you like it ride it.
 
Last edited:

TForan

Well-Known Member
Beautiful pictures ! I just rode a nice regular bike $$$ in town and I hated it. Felt small and no zip to speak of. I'm so used to the long wheelbase and forgiving tires. Ride whatever you want but don't judge a bike ,you have never ridden.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
I don't care who rides what. Regarding multi-kilowatt fat e-bikes, call them e-motorcycles and let's have it done.
 

TForan

Well-Known Member
I don't care who rides what. Regarding multi-kilowatt fat e-bikes, call them e-motorcycles and let's have it done.

I'm sorry you have to deal with euroweenie specs. 250watts? Ah, how cute. Mine doesn't even have a throttle , so probably not a e-motorcycle. And yours ?
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
I don't understand all the insecurity with eBikers. The first sentences of your post comments about what others think about fat bikes, then you do a little name calling of your own to show your distain with those who ride what they want to ride. We don't all have to be in separate tribes, let's just enjoy the ride we want! As a retired engineer, I would be worried about a folding frame riding that rough of terrain. It can't be easy on that hinge and the reliance on the butt welds with no gussets or reinforcements.
 

Haystacks

Member
I don't understand all the insecurity with eBikers. The first sentences of your post comments about what others think about fat bikes, then you do a little name calling of your own to show your distain with those who ride what they want to ride. We don't all have to be in separate tribes, let's just enjoy the ride we want! As a retired engineer, I would be worried about a folding frame riding that rough of terrain. It can't be easy on that hinge and the reliance on the butt welds with no gussets or reinforcements.

First read the apples thread. Second its gussetted, unlike the montague paratroopers that have been converted, the frame is solid, the hinge plate is about 10 mill maybe more on both sides. Its the pivot bolts that bother me lol
 

legsofbeer

Active Member
Regarding multi-kilowatt fat e-bikes, call them e-motorcycles and let's have it done.

Bolton Ebikes just released a video clarifying federal and california laws on ebike classification. Short version:

class 1: 20mph limit powered, 750w max, no throttle
class 2: class 1 limits with throttle
class 3: 28mph limit powered, 750w max, no throttle (yes, this makes no sense)
moped: capable of 30mph, 3000w max, throttle
motorcyle: 3000w+

 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
Bolton Ebikes just released a video clarifying federal and california laws on ebike classification. Short version:

class 1: 20mph limit powered, 750w max, no throttle
class 2: class 1 limits with throttle
class 3: 28mph limit powered, 750w max, no throttle (yes, this makes no sense)
moped: capable of 30mph, 3000w max, throttle
motorcyle: 3000w+


So it sounds like my Espin Sport is Class 3?
 

legsofbeer

Active Member
So it sounds like my Espin Sport is Class 3?
Dunno. There's also the question of, if I configure my controller to limit power to speeds of 20mph or less, and turn off the throttle (there's a switch for this), is my 750w bike permitted where only class 1 bikes are?