Fat guy (280 lbs) Looking for 2000w Hand throttled Kit/parts Where to begin.

Lowquality

New Member
Hello, My name is Rob - I want to get back in shape and I tried riding my bike and MAN are my legs out of shape. Needless to say, I want to be able to choose when I want to actually pedal, and when I can just sit back and joy ride and rest.


The bike , my brother is 400lbs and went to a bike shop a few years ago and bought a nice big $500 bike that he never uses, he gave it to me. So its pretty sturdy I'll get some pictures soon.

I have a 1200 watt scooter that seems to be able to push me along at 22mph with me and my 45lb son riding on it. So I'd not want to get anything lower than that. 1500w wouldnt be that bad however.

I'll get pics so i can figure out the brake system on the bike.


So here is the nitty gritty: Where do I start? I do not mind a kit bike, and I am not against just buying each piece by itself, I just do not know where to start - I figured the Ebay kits are pretty low quality.

http://www.electricmotorsport.com/e...-ebike-36v-72v-2000w-conversion-kit-rear.html

how would a kit like this work?

or perhaps something like this. http://www.cyclone-tw.com

I suppose without all of the information given its hard for anyone to really give me complete answers - but point me in the right direction.


** my brother is an electrician so I figured installation wouldn't be that difficult .
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
I always worry about stuff blowing up. Maybe I worry too much.

I've read that high power direct drive like that 2000W kit can easily rip out the wheel mounts (called drop outs) on an aluminum front fork, and still tear up steel forks.. Users put torsion arms on to counteract that. Also can happen on rear drive motors. You still want to make sure your frame can take the stress.

Then I look at your second link, and the 3000W picture shows a motor that uses a hose clamp for reinforcement, and it's capable of 60 mph. Yikes. Again, make sure your bike frame and its brakes can handle that power. I also think the lower power kits shown on that page would move you along OK at bike speeds.

I think you also will need a lot a battery to power 2000 watts, and believe you don't need that kind of power to cruise home. You need it to win a drag race.

If there is a retail store near you, maybe you can demo an e-bike and see if the 500W and 1000W models can meet your needs. That will help you decide what kind of kit components will work for you.

PS. You're only 80lbs more than me. I did lose 7 lbs this summer and I blame my bikes, pedal and e-kit.
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
Weight is weight. This is a cargo bike rated for 350# with a 750 watt motor. That's enough watts for many purposes, everything but steep hills. The motor works hard to get heavy weights up to speed, but then it only works maybe 15% harder to keep it moving.


http://www.radpowerbikes.com/products/radwagon-electric-cargo-bike

Be careful with 2000 watt bikes unless the frame is very strong and the brakes are bullet-proof. They aren't legal, as ebikes.
 

Lowquality

New Member
:) well I've already know the laws are bullcrap and are kinda anti fat people. Such as my 1200w scooter is not legal as it goes over 25mph on flat ground with a 150 pound rider - its meant to go 35mph - but with my fatbutt on it it only goes 22-23 mph. So while its illegal, a scooter that would only got 25 mph has a 200lb weight limit meaning It wouldnt even hold me. I assume bikes are the same - I'm not going to be flying around going very fast anyways, 30 mph prob my max id want to go so I doubt I'll have any problems with the police , small town so i know most the police force anyways.

Oh great question: does it take less force for a motor to push a Bike than it does to push a scooter?
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
These have been reviewed here. The price is right. You have to pick the right wheel size and brake configuration. You could just get in touch with them. They sell batteries. If you know what you want, you know what you want.

http://lunacycle.com
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
Oh great question: does it take less force for a motor to push a Bike than it does to push a scooter?
A bike has pedals, and I like using them. Having the motor "amplify the pedal" is what makes an ebike fun for me. Well, maybe it doesn't amplify on my bike. It just knows the pedals are spinning at some speed and it feeds the motor some power to match.

If you don't pedal, scooter is likely the same as the bike.
 

Lowquality

New Member
Mr George S , that kit looks like what I need, I definitely will check it out - also will check the reviews out. Might be a noob question but - I assume I do want a freewheel as that kit has regenerative braking (i honestly dont know what a freewheel is so I wont pretend I do)


ALso from wikipedia - on LA bike laws.
Louisiana
Louisiana Revised Statute R.S. 32:1(41) defines a motorized bicycle as a pedal bicycle which may be propelled by human power or helper motor, or by both, with a motor rated no more than one and one-half brake horsepower, a cylinder capacity not exceeding fifty cubic centimeters, an automatic transmission, and which produces a maximum design speed of no more than twenty-five miles per hour on a flat surface. Motorized bicycles falling within this definition must be registered and titled under Louisiana law. Additionally, a motorized bicycle operated upon Louisiana roadways or highways by a person fifteen years of age or older and producing more than five horsepower must possesses a valid driver's license with a motorcycle endorsement and adhere to laws governing the operation of a motorcycle, including the wearing of approved eye protectors or a windshield and the wearing of a helmet. The statute also states that "Motorized bicycles such as pocket bikes and scooters that do not meet the requirements of this policy shall not be registered."

As R.S. 32:1(41) refers to motorized bicycles using "an automatic transmission" with helper motors rated in horsepower and cylinder capacity, not by watts or volts, the statute arguably does not cover bicycles powered by an electric motor(s), whether self-propelled or pedal-assist designs.
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
The freewheel comes into play when you build a kit and the old wheel has a cassette. The quick guide to the difference is here, but if a kit says you need a freewheel, you probably need one. As far as I know you can't take your old bike with a set of sprockets on the back and move the sprockets to the wheel with the motor.

https://www.sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html

Any kit seller that offers customer service can work this out in a few minutes, but a lot depends on what they have in stock. The regenerative braking won't do much good unless you live where there are steep hills. You want good brakes, good tires. You might need to reinforce the bike where the motor slides into the frame. See if you can get good answers from the seller on how to set it up with your bike.

The Louisiana law looks like they never addressed electric bikes. It's all about automatic transmissions and motors rated in CC's. You might be OK with an electric bike, but they seem to require registration. It's that last paragraph you quote that shows it isn't clear.
 

JoePah

Well-Known Member
@Lowquality Your choices seem reasonable but I don't know those companies and can't speak about their customer service, which is key.

I hope your bike is all steel. If it isn't I'd consider looking for something else or buy a complete bike like @George S. said.

If I were you and had around $2000 to spend, I'd call the men at Electric Rider. They have everything that you want, and then some. They are in Texas.

I would buy a torque heavy, direct drive rear hub motor, their 48v40A kit, with the Brute motor. And a 1Kwh LiFe battery, Clydesdale Edition.. Heavy but very reliable.

http://www.electricrider.com

http://www.electricrider.com
 
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Lowquality

New Member
Well i picked up my brothers bike, forgot the one I rode earlier was different. This one is a Raleigh Venture 3.0 XL purchased in 2007-2008 - I know its an aluminum frame, but can not tell what the part that matters is.

Besides needing a BIG clean up and oiling , would this bike be well enough? It held my brother up when he was 400 lbs + but has set in a garage for the last 4 years :|





 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
I own a 2013 Raleigh Route 5.0 that's very similar. Weight limit is 250lb. The bike has an inexpensive, lightweight alloy Suntour front fork (thin wall tubes w/steel spring, mine was recalled) and lowend Tektro rim brakes. Wheels are 700c with standard road spokes. Stock tires are likely Kenda 700c x 35c or 38c.

I won't advise you on what you should or shouldn't do, but I can tell you what your Raleigh has, I'm very familiar with them. I wouldn't max out the weight and ride my Raleigh at 30 mph.
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
Raleigh is a basic aluminum frame. This is a cargo frame, steel. This bike has disk brakes. The closer you can get to this, the better:

RadWagon_LeftSide_1024x1024.jpg
 

Lowquality

New Member
well I cant find any weight limits, but I'd be shocked if the bike shop sold a 400+ lb guy a 250lb limited bike. Okay - so If i were going to buy a bike - any leads on where to find one thats sturdy and won't break the bank? I'd have to assume mongoose at walmart is a nono.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
well I cant find any weight limits, but I'd be shocked if the bike shop sold a 400+ lb guy a 250lb limited bike. Okay - so If i were going to buy a bike - any leads on where to find one thats sturdy and won't break the bank? I'd have to assume mongoose at walmart is a nono.
Weight limit is 275, a little better. Page 33 of the owners manual.
http://www.panly.net
 

JoePah

Well-Known Member
Cheap AL bike with cheap rim brakes is not something u want to convert to an ebike.

That rad rover looks pretty good. It's not any longer than a fat bike.

If you want a DIY bike look for a steel 26" inch tire bike with solid forks Look on Craigslist. I buy and sell bikes in there all the time
 

Ann M.

Well-Known Member
Rob, if you like hybrid or mountain bike style cycles you could consider doing a conversion on a Giant, Specialized, Trek, Surley or the Yuba like in George S.'s picture and one with disc brakes, for sure. These all have some models with higher carrying capacities, while the Yuba and a few other stretch bikes are more of the cargo type. Look for a good used one and get on the phone or email with the Golden Motor people directly in Canada; they're really helpful. I've worked with the folks at Electricrider.com; they're just up the road from Austin in San Angelo and they are used to doing build ups of heavy duty ebikes. Their geared motors designed for torque might be the better choice.

With an ebike setup you wouldn't really need the triple chainring in the front which will save some weight. Think seriously before putting a lot of $$ into the Raleigh- those brakes will not be adequate for a 1000 to 2K motor setup and honestly, 2000 watts is probably more than you really need if you're not interested in going 40mph on a bike. If you have someone to help you with the conversion, maybe consider doing one of the mid drive systems, like a Bafang BBS-02, which will have a ton of torque and utilizes the gearing of the bike.
 

Lowquality

New Member
My local bike shop has a steel framed single speed bike - but it is medium build, might be to small for me 6'1" -


Oh - Well I have a 4 year old who likes to ride on the scooter with me, he'd prob love to come along on bike rides also, is it any harder to install a motor on one of those long frames than a normal bike?
 

Ann M.

Well-Known Member
Not at all; just make sure you get a longer wiring harness to accommodate the extra length. Take some measurements from the handlebars where a throttle and console unit would be, run along the underside of the top tube and on to where you think you'll mount a controller and that's your longest wires for the system. Use some string or other flexible material to get that measurement if you're figuring out options for mounting the controller unit.
 

Lowquality

New Member
Wife said I cant put the kids on the bike, oh well scrap that.

So my local shop has a single speed steel framed bike - would I have any problems with a single speed, or should I get an adjustable speed. Looking pretty closely that the http://lunacycle.com - found it odd that the golden pie people in canada do not have a 1500w motor you could buy, is there a reason for this? they are also more expensive than the lunacycle. thx for answering my dumb questions.