First e-bike for commuting with steep roads

I agree with the folks recommending a mid drive bike. I have no experience with Bafang motors but do have a mountain bike with a Brose motor (made in Germany). That bike will climb almost anything within reason. I also have two hub drive bikes with claimed torque of 60 ft-lbs and 100 ft-lbs. I do not think either one would be as good a hill climber as the Brose equipped mid drive. My point is that the claimed torque ratings are often not helpful. Same goes for the wattage. The mid drive is ostensibly rated for 250 watts, while the two hub drives are 750 and 1000 watts.

My two hub drives are from Ride1Up out of San Diego California. Ride1Up now sells a mid drive bike with a Brose motor. It falls into your price range - its $2300 US, not sure of the Canadian cost. I am pretty sure they ship to CA but charge an extra $100 or so. Check it out.

 

teskow

Active Member
I too have the Ride1Up Prodigy. It is a great machine that climbs hills like a goat with a wonderful smooth, quiet power delivery. It is a beautiful machine that I believe will be hard to beat for the $$$$.
 

DaveMatthews

Well-Known Member
Here's another shop to check out...

 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Here's another shop to check out...
Awesome specs on this Giant bike at Steedcycles, - Good motor - high capacity battery, nice drive train (2x11 22 speed) and a good looking bike

If it were me I'd be sure to test ride one of these if you canI could, before you making a decision

Giant2021ExploreE_1ProGTS_1800x1800.jpg
 

DaveMatthews

Well-Known Member
Awesome specs on this Giant bike at Steedcycles, - Good motor - high capacity battery, nice drive train (2x11 22 speed) and a good looking bike

If it were me I'd be sure to test ride one of these if you canI could, before you making a decision

Giant2021ExploreE_1ProGTS_1800x1800.jpg
A little over budget, but nice choice.
Looks out of stock though
 

TrevorB

Active Member
While Gazelles are expensive they are built to last. Dutch know how to make quality commuters.
Being derailleur stuck with usual chain maintenance. Expect 3000-3500km from chain , replace at 0.75 wear mark. Every 2nd chain replace complete drivetrain ie cassette, idlers on derailleur, chainring. Because you are replacing everything drive chain can be ridden into ground so expect lot more than 3500kms.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
While Gazelles are expensive they are built to last. Dutch know how to make quality commuters.
Being derailleur stuck with usual chain maintenance. Expect 3000-3500km from chain , replace at 0.75 wear mark. Every 2nd chain replace complete drivetrain ie cassette, idlers on derailleur, chainring. Because you are replacing everything drive chain can be ridden into ground so expect lot more than 3500kms.
I replace the chain at the .5 mark and get nearly twice the life out of the cassette. It also helps get more life out of the cassette if you ease
up on the pedal pressure while shifting. Some Shimano cassettes, like the XT 11 or 12 speed, have replaceable smaller cogs that you can get on ebay for around $10 each. The smaller ones are the first to wear out as the chain holds on the them with way fewer teeth.
 

TrevorB

Active Member
I replace the chain at the .5 mark and get nearly twice the life out of the cassette. It also helps get more life out of the cassette if you ease
up on the pedal pressure while shifting. Some Shimano cassettes, like the XT 11 or 12 speed, have replaceable smaller cogs that you can get on ebay for around $10 each. The smaller ones are the first to wear out as the chain holds on the them with way fewer teeth.
Gazelle has 10spd, so no option to change individual cogs. But cassettes are lot cheaper.
 

retiredNH

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
The Giant is an odd bike - double chainrings. First time I've seen that with an ebike. Even analog bikes are moving away from doubles.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
The Giant is an odd bike - double chainrings. First time I've seen that with an ebike. Even analog bikes are moving away from doubles.
Not necessarily for good reason. On mountain bikes having just one derailleur to deal with can be a good thing so 1x systems are increasingly popular. Hence on mountain and gravel bikes, 1x drive trains are quite popular.

On a road bikes, it is way easier to achieve a broader gear range with a 22 speed than and 11 speed. Virtually all road bikes feature a 2x gear train for that reason. They also keep the weight down without the pie pan 51 tooth cogs on the 12 speed 1x setups.

The Cannondale Topstone Neo 2, a Bosch powered 28 mph/45 kph gravel ebike that came out two years ago, was the first ebike to my knowledge to have a 2x with Bosch motors and Giant is the second...not at all common but an attractive option IMO.

Not suggesting this bike for the OP, especially in Canada with a class 3 motor and way over budget. CHeck out the specs.

 
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retiredNH

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Actually, ebikes and mountain bikes have moved away for very good reasons. For example, I have almost the same range of gearing on my Allant 8s as the Topstone Neo Carbon 2, without the additional hassle of duplicate gears and an additional derailleur crowding my bar and adding maintenance. With an ebike, few riders need the finer shift steps one can get with a dual or triple. Analog roadies care, but then they're riding in much more consistent terrain than a analog gravel or mtb rider.

Cannondale is obviously targeting road bikers new to ebikes with their "real road gearing"
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
Actually, ebikes and mountain bikes have moved away for very good reasons. For example, I have almost the same range of gearing on my Allant 8s as the Topstone Neo Carbon 2, without the additional hassle of duplicate gears and an additional derailleur crowding my bar and adding maintenance. With an ebike, few riders need the finer shift steps one can get with a dual or triple. Analog roadies care, but then they're riding in much more consistent terrain than a analog gravel or mtb rider.

Cannondale is obviously targeting road bikers new to ebikes with their "real road gearing"
what you lose though is the bikes suck without power. my Allent 8 is a dog without power. a 2% grade takes over 200 watts to climb. those fat tires really eat up the power. my bulls with 1.5" tires will way out accelerate the allant even with more torque.
 

retiredNH

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
what you lose though is the bikes suck without power. my Allent 8 is a dog without power. a 2% grade takes over 200 watts to climb. those fat tires really eat up the power. my bulls with 1.5" tires will way out accelerate the allant even with more torque.
Does a double or triple crank fix this problem? Of course not. ebikes are still heavier.
 

DaveMatthews

Well-Known Member
When I first went out to buy an ebike (Aug 2018) I almost bought a 2018 Giant Dirt-E. That bike has a Shimano 2x9 setup.
I'd have bought it had I not nonchalantly asked "what will be new for 2019?"
He showed me the 2019 Fathom on his computer and I had it in less than a week. The Fathom was 1x10, as is my Stance.
 

retiredNH

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
it would give you more leverage though. a smaller chainring would help a lot. like I climb this hill once in while the gearing is too high to get more then 30rpms going up it so I dont get all the power. a smaller chainring would help a lot.
Your answer makes no sense to me. No one (at least no one I can think of...) would ride up a hill like this with an ebike, motor off.
I'll step out of this discussion since it's becoming non-sensical.
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
Your answer makes no sense to me. No one (at least no one I can think of...) would ride up a hill like this with an ebike, motor off.
I'll step out of this discussion since it's becoming non-sensical.
where did I say no motor? but the hill is so steep that Cant spin fast enough to get the max torque out of the motor because the chain right is too big. if I had a smaller chain ring I could get more then 30 rpms. a smaller chainring would also let you use the bike with less power or no power. thats where having two charing rings would be good. a cassette with my range can help but then you dont have the smaller spacings between cogs. I have maxed out the assist a bosch motor can provide going up steep hills and you also have to have 60 rpms cadence to get the max out of the motor. the hills can be so steep I can't peddle that fast.
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
Of course, that is exaggerated by the telephoto lense.
is 20 to 22% grade. what I have found on my bosch if I can put out 400 to 450 watts and keep the rpms above 60 I max out the assist. I have tested this by doing that then changing assist levels and I get no more assist from eco to turbo. at about 35- watts I see a little change. but this is in a constant output I have gotten peaks of more then that on really short bursts.
 
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TForan52

Member
Region
USA
is 20 to 22% grade. what I have found on my bosch if I can put out 400 to 450 watts and keep the rpms above 60 I max out the assist. I have tested this by doing that then changing assist levels and I get no more assist from eco to turbo. at about 35- watts I see a little change. but this is in a constant output I have gotten peaks of more then that on really short bursts.
So, that’s how it actually looks if you were standing at the bottom of the hill ?