First eBike - Rad Power Rad City vs Ariel C Class

Ryan W

New Member
I am looking to buy my first eBike (really it will be my first bike purchase ever). I am looking to get an eBike for everyday commuting (3.5 miles, not especially hilly, basically 100 ft vertical downhill to the valley and 100 ft vertical back up). I would also like to be able to put my kids in a trailer, or in a baby seat, or a trailer bike, or some combination thereof. I want to be able to share it with my wife and strongly prefer the upright style of riding, so I am looking for a step-thru. I had really been set on the RadCity, but once my wife agreed to get a bike I figured I should actually look around at other models. I have also looked at IZIP E3 Simi and Electra Townie Go! 7D, but they don't look to have as many features as the others at that price point. I was wanting to stay under $1600, but I am really intrigued by the Ariel C Class and have seen most people choose that when putting them head to head. I am a bike novice so looking for something with easy maintenance. Let me know if you think I should go with RadCity or Ariel C Class, or maybe some other bike I haven't even mentioned. Thanks!
 

Dewey

Well-Known Member
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AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
When it comes to handling any kind of trailer, I think you're going to find the Rad City's power marginal at best. This is due to it's direct drive rear hub. They're just not up to "hauling" anything (think gutless here).

Gear driven rear hubs on the other hand, would do what you are talking about nicely. The Rad Rover, or possibly the new Rad Wagon (not the old/original one!) would both work.

For even more power (pulling/climbing), a mid drive with a reasonably large motor (750 watts) would do nicely, but then you start talking about more money.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I would strongly discourage you from getting a Rad City if you want to be hauling a trailer around.

I would get a Rad Rover instead.
It has geared motor, not gearless direct drive.

Rad City Step Thru

Rad Rover Step Thru
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I would watch these videos if I were you.

It explains all the basics of ebike motor, and well worth you time.

 

Perdendosi

New Member
I am looking to buy my first eBike (really it will be my first bike purchase ever). I am looking to get an eBike for everyday commuting (3.5 miles, not especially hilly, basically 100 ft vertical downhill to the valley and 100 ft vertical back up). I would also like to be able to put my kids in a trailer, or in a baby seat, or a trailer bike, or some combination thereof. I want to be able to share it with my wife and strongly prefer the upright style of riding, so I am looking for a step-thru. I had really been set on the RadCity, but once my wife agreed to get a bike I figured I should actually look around at other models. I have also looked at IZIP E3 Simi and Electra Townie Go! 7D, but they don't look to have as many features as the others at that price point. I was wanting to stay under $1600, but I am really intrigued by the Ariel C Class and have seen most people choose that when putting them head to head. I am a bike novice so looking for something with easy maintenance. Let me know if you think I should go with RadCity or Ariel C Class, or maybe some other bike I haven't even mentioned. Thanks!

Thanks for posting this, Ryan. I'm a newb to the forum and to ebikes in general. I was focusing on fat tire bike (because they're fun), but I share many requirements with you. The Ariel C looks pretty awesome, specially with the mid-drive motor, the internal geared hub, the hydraulic brakes, and the ability to easily put a child seat on the back. Now I feel like have have to look at a whole other class of bikes!
 

Ryan W

New Member
Thanks to everyone for the responses. It looks like the consensus has it that I should remove RadCity from my comparison and replace it with the RadRover Step-Thru and the RadWagon 4. Looking at the RadWagon a little harder for the first time, especially with the accessory options for the rear rack that could eliminate the need for a trailer.

So it looks like the comparison in terms of capabilities is either the 750W Geared Hub Motor of the RadRover Step-Thru and RadWagon 4 vs the 500W mid-drive motor, hydraulic brakes, and internal heard hub of the Ariel C Class.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Thanks to everyone for the responses. It looks like the consensus has it that I should remove RadCity from my comparison and replace it with the RadRover Step-Thru and the RadWagon 4. Looking at the RadWagon a little harder for the first time, especially with the accessory options for the rear rack that could eliminate the need for a trailer.

So it looks like the comparison in terms of capabilities is either the 750W Geared Hub Motor of the RadRover Step-Thru and RadWagon 4 vs the 500W mid-drive motor, hydraulic brakes, and internal heard hub of the Ariel C Class.
I would not get a RadWagon.
There are alternatives out there.

Rad put this proprietary 22 inch tire, which is virtually impossible to get a replacement tube.
Rad Power is not known for keeping their parts in stock or fast response. Although Rad customers are generally happy with their service.

The rumor says that you can stretch a 20 inch tube or squeeze 24 inch tube, but I don't know if I would personally want to be doing that.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
What alternatives do you think would work better?
Eunorau Long Trail Cargo

$1,839 (after discount code)
500W Dapu Mid Drive
48V 11.6Ah (14Ah available)




Eunorau Long Trail Cargo

$1,471 (after discount code)
750W hub motor
48V 11.6Ah (14Ah available)


 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
VoltBike Kodiak

- $1899
- Hydraulic Brakes
- 48V 17.5Ah battery


I also believe that this bike's top speed can be unlocked to Class 3.



Voltbike Kodiak Electric Cargo Bike
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
M2S All Cargo

 

Ryan W

New Member
Thanks @Timpo for those suggestions. I am intrigued by the Eunorau MAX-Cargo, but honestly, it being a Chinese drop-ship company does worry me with customer service. I understand your hesitancy with the RadWagon given the custom tires. Does ordering extra tubes immediately solve that problem? Even if I build that into the cost its still more affordable than the other options.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Thanks @Timpo for those suggestions. I am intrigued by the Eunorau MAX-Cargo, but honestly, it being a Chinese drop-ship company does worry me with customer service. I understand your hesitancy with the RadWagon given the custom tires. Does ordering extra tubes immediately solve that problem? Even if I build that into the cost its still more affordable than the other options.
Well I can only speak from my experience but...

You're worried about customer service, which is a valid point, but for what?
In my case, it was the warranty. Which expired in 1 year, and it went by quick.

Rad Power and Eunorau are both what we call "internet bikes".
Both companies are well exposed on EBR YouTube channel (although Rad Power is more popular and well known).

When you order your bike, you will be ordering online. No difference there.

Eunorau ships to your door straight from China.
Rad Power ships from China to USA warehouse, then USA warehouse to your door.

The physical location of bike company is not relevant when you order online.
I have Juiced, which is a well known American ebike company but it's build by Luyuan Bikes, and it's Made in China.

When I encountered problems, I had NO physical store to go to. Just like Rad Power and Eunorau.
Everything was done through emails and web chat.
(Just like Eunorau)

Although I haven't bought a bike from Eunorau, I bought a battery from them and had no problem.

Eunorau uses more non-proprietary parts.
Hailong and Reention are some of the most popular ebike battery casing in the ebike industry.

When my Juiced battery was done, which was Reention Dorado, I was able to pick my new batteries from literally well over 20 different ebike companies.

With Rad Power, you are stuck with proprietary battery, proprietary tires, tubes, and whatever else.
No, you can't upgrade your tires to Michelin Protek or Schwalbe Marathon.
I was able to upgrade the battery capacity too.

Imagine you have a bike right now, whether it's a Rad Power, Trek, Specialized, Juiced, etc.
Do you really want to be contacting Rad Power, when your tube punctures, and pay for tube + shipping? And wait several days or weeks?
or would you rather be able to go to local bike shop and get it?

Sometimes Rad does not have parts in stock, so you would have to wait to arrive from China.

Sure, you can stock up tubes and tires, but do you really want to?

I'm glad that I was not on hook with one brand when I got my new tubes, tires, battery, etc.
I was able to go on Amazon, AliExpress, local bike stores, and contact other ebike companies, etc... so much more selection.

Obviously it's up to you, Rad Power generally has good reputation, and also it is a very popular bike and has aftermarket support from ebike tuners like Bolton and Electro Bike World, so that you can boost up your power.

But I just don't like the idea of you can't even go to local bike store, Amazon, eBay, AliExpress, other ebike companies, etc.. to get your parts even after the warranty period.
 
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Perdendosi

New Member
Ryan and all:
Thanks for asking this question, and Timo, thanks SO MUCH for your answers. I was looking for a fat tire ebike for me, but I talked my wife into buying a bike for her. But she really wanted a cargo to take my daughter on (she thought that would be easier than using a seat on a rack like I was thinking on my bike). Your answers convinced her to go with the Eunorau mid-drive.
I spent about a week finding my bike (I went with a Rize Mini). With your questions and answers, she found hers in 20 minutes.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Ryan and all:
Thanks for asking this question, and Timo, thanks SO MUCH for your answers. I was looking for a fat tire ebike for me, but I talked my wife into buying a bike for her. But she really wanted a cargo to take my daughter on (she thought that would be easier than using a seat on a rack like I was thinking on my bike). Your answers convinced her to go with the Eunorau mid-drive.
I spent about a week finding my bike (I went with a Rize Mini). With your questions and answers, she found hers in 20 minutes.
great! 😁
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
So what's the difference between Eunorau mid-drive (posted above) and Bolton Hercules?


 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
So what's the difference between Eunorau mid-drive (posted above) and Bolton Hercules?


20" wheels are for riding in cities that have perfect pavement. My city has numerous bottomless gas valve holes and potholes in the winter that get fixed in May. Cargo bikes don't come with suspensions.
If you want perfection and dealer service, my yubabike bodaboda was perfect. It doesn't need torque checking of the spokes monthly like a radwagon (see known problems thread). It was $1800 with bags double leg stand front basket & free freight but without power. I hated the bosch mid drive yuba was selling in 2017, but now they sell a shimano esteps electric that doesn't drag power off. I ride power off a lot. I'm very happy with my front geared hub motor that controls the effect of headwind. Hanging the battery up front leaves the back for 80 lb of groceries or weed killer. Unlike the 2 previous MTB and a cruiser, it hasn't had the front wheel whip sideways on bumps and pitch me on my chin. I think having my weight on the front tire helps stability.
Other big wheel cargo bikes are xtracycle and kona ute.
 
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AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
20" wheels are for riding in cities that have perfect pavement. My city has numerous bottomless gas valve holes and potholes in the winter that get fixed in May. Cargo bikes don't come with suspensions.
If you want perfection and dealer service, my yubabike bodaboda was perfect. It doesn't need torque checking of the spokes monthly like a radwagon (see known problems thread). It was $1800 with bags double leg stand front basket & free freight but without power. I hated the bosch mid drive yuba was selling in 2017, but now they sell a shimano esteps electric that doesn't drag power off. I ride power off a lot. I'm very happy with my front geared hub motor that controls the effect of headwind. Hanging the battery up front leaves the back for 80 lb of groceries or weed killer. Unlike the 2 previous MTB and a cruiser, it hasn't had the front wheel whip sideways on bumps and pitch me on my chin. I think having my weight on the front tire helps stability.
Other big wheel cargo bikes are xtracycle and kona ute.


Just a quick nit pick here regarding the reference to required monthly checks of the spoke tension on Rad bikes. That's complete hogwash. The "known issue" is regarding initial set up only.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Just a quick nit pick here regarding the reference to required monthly checks of the spoke tension on Rad bikes. That's complete hogwash. The "known issue" is regarding initial set up only.
Posts 2,4,7,10,36,51,84,85,97,99,105,106,107,108,114,116,155
I've adjusted the spokes on my yuba wheel never in 5000 miles. The power wheel from ebikeling.com, once, two of them at 4500 miles. I weekly gross 330 lb with 60 lb groceries, and once 400 lb with 110 lb groceries. The groceries were on the back yuba wheel.