First flat

Gordon71

Active Member
I have a box of these, more expensive but 100 flats is more than I hope to have in my life:




Make sure you get tire levers and any other tools you might need.

I'd recommend a lower pressure higher volume pump for a fat tire bike. You'll likely never pump up those tires to 40 psi. This is a better (but more expensive) choice:

Thanks. I found it on Amazon and made the switch.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Tire levers are essential. That looks like a nice pump. I use 25 g CO2 cartridges for my 26 x 4 fatties and a little inflator.

As for the patches, I get that the bargain aspect of 50 for a buck is enticing but unless you're a bike shop, the reality is that you're probably only going to use 3 or 4 patches out of the pack before you lose them or die. Still a bargain I guess,... I like fresh little Park patch kits.

TT
True, true. I help teach cycling skills to local youth groups. Flat repair is one of the skills they master. I donate patches and glue, my son with the bike component company he works for donates tubes. A dozen kids run through a lot of patches to get it right! 😎
 

Tars Tarkas

Active Member
True, true. I help teach cycling skills to local youth groups. Flat repair is one of the skills they master. I donate patches and glue, my son with the bike component company he works for donates tubes. A dozen kids run through a lot of patches to get it right! 😎
Ah, well, okay then. That's great!

TT
 

Tars Tarkas

Active Member
That Klic pump loooks very nice.
Yeah, it's been nagging at me since that was posted. I just bought one. (Cheaper on Amazon, btw.)

I've been getting by fine with just CO2, all the while thinking about what happens when I'm on the trail and i use the last one and still need more air?

TT
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Yeah, it's been nagging at me since that was posted. I just bought one. (Cheaper on Amazon, btw.)

I've been getting by fine with just CO2, all the while thinking about what happens when I'm on the trail and i use the last one and still need more air?

TT
I carry a mini pump in addition to a CO2 inflator for the same reason. Everything fits in a vertically oriented saddle bag.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
Anyone noticed a tube shortage? When I ordered my Schwalbe tires last week from their website, they were out of tubes. When I picked up my Specialized a couple of weeks ago, I purchased the last tube on the shelf at the LBS. The Specialized website shows out of stock on every tube size:
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Gordon71

Active Member
So far so good. My stuff from Amazon arrived today so I'm fixing my very first flat. First I'd like to say how much I like those little handle
bar jack stands. The only thing I needed to do was loosen the bracket on my mirror and rotate it a bit. The little jack stands mounted to my grips kept the upside down bike very stable and I think my extra wide saddle also helped there. First step was to remove the rear wheel which was easier than I thought it would be. Very easy in fact. Removing the tire was also very easy. I found the offending 1" brad nail,pulled it out,and carefully felt for anything else. I then installed the Mr. Tuffy liner loosely,put a little air in the new tube,put that in the tire,adjusted the liner evenly,and then re-installed the tire on the wheel. All that was pretty easy as well. I didn't even need the tire tool for that part. Maybe it's easier on fat tires. I pumped up the tire to 20lbs and decided to let it sit for a bit to be sure there are no small leaks.

I expect I'll patch the old tube and carry it as a spare which brings up a question. I found pre-glued patches on Amazon but have not ordered them. Anyone have any experience with those?
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Stick-on patches work, but generally don't last as long and aren't as strong as a glue-on patch.

If you just need to get home or someplace you can replace the tube they are fine.
 

Gordon71

Active Member
Final report (I hope). Pressure stayed good in the rear wheel so I did the final step which was to slime both tires. I started with the front one. Deflated and put in 8oz or half the bottle. Pumped up the tire but while I was spinning the tire to distribute the slime it looked like the tire was going up and down slightly. Examining it showed it wasn't seated evenly all around in the rim. I think what happened was because the wheel was off the floor while I put in the slime gravity did it's thing. Anyway I removed the wheel (glad I started with the front) laid it flat,and reinflated it. Looked even this time so I put it back on the bike and spun it and it looked fine. When I slimed the rear wheel the bike was on the floor until I had inflated it and I didn't have the same problem. Rode it up and down my 800' driveway a few times and everything seems fine. If they still have 20 psi tomorrow I'll claim success and go for a longer ride.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
So far so good. My stuff from Amazon arrived today so I'm fixing my very first flat. First I'd like to say how much I like those little handle
bar jack stands. The only thing I needed to do was loosen the bracket on my mirror and rotate it a bit. The little jack stands mounted to my grips kept the upside down bike very stable and I think my extra wide saddle also helped there. First step was to remove the rear wheel which was easier than I thought it would be. Very easy in fact. Removing the tire was also very easy. I found the offending 1" brad nail,pulled it out,and carefully felt for anything else. I then installed the Mr. Tuffy liner loosely,put a little air in the new tube,put that in the tire,adjusted the liner evenly,and then re-installed the tire on the wheel. All that was pretty easy as well. I didn't even need the tire tool for that part. Maybe it's easier on fat tires. I pumped up the tire to 20lbs and decided to let it sit for a bit to be sure there are no small leaks.

I expect I'll patch the old tube and carry it as a spare which brings up a question. I found pre-glued patches on Amazon but have not ordered them. Anyone have any experience with those?
I don't use the self adhesive patches. Some product reviews aren't as glowing as I'd like for what I consider to be a longterm solution. I've never had a conventional patch fail so I'll 'stick' (pun intended) with those. I rotate my spare tube in for a flatted tube and make it the spare after a patch back at the shop. I usually get 3 or more patches before a tube develops an issue that can't be patched; new hole too near an existing patch or the valve stem, elongated hole, or a split seam.

For the youth cycling class I help teach they all need to demonstrate that they can fix a flat on their bike. Some have issues the first time through; poor prep, bad location, etc. But they all get it, then we're off together on some long rides.

BTW - pumping a tire up to ~1/2 pressure or less is a good technique to be sure the tire bead has seated all around the rim on both sides. Otherwise the tire bead will eventually allow the tube to leak out and burst with a loud bang.
 

DDBB

Well-Known Member
You should have the koolstop tire bead/jack tool to make putting the tire back on the rim easy..You'll thank me later
 

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Tars Tarkas

Active Member
CO2 cartridges may FREEZE the Slime product but they have been addressing this issue use Premium Slime if you use CO2 cartridges .

https://www.slime.com/au/products/bike/sealants/tubeless-sealant.php
Your link is for Slime for tubeless tire. It's important to know that there is Slime for tube tires and Slime for tubeless tires. Two different products. And I didn't read real carefully, but I think their claim of CO2 compatibility has to do with CO2 permeating it way through rubber. (A claim I've never seen in my experience, at least to a level I cared about.) The idea of CO2 freezing Slime seems highly unlikely, beyond on a very localized area that would thaw almost instantly in any case.

TT
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
I use CO2 to reinflate field flat fixes, it's just faster. No tire sealant. By next morning every tire I've filled with CO2 is at ~1/2 pressure. I pump them up with the shop pump and they're good to go.
 

Tars Tarkas

Active Member
I hardly ever use anything but CO2 to air up my tires. I carry a 5# bottle of CO2 for my FJ Cruiser, so I use it when I air up my bike before a ride. I use 25 gram CO2 carts if I need to air up on the trail, which I most often have to do only when I air down on purpose to ride on sand. Maybe having a healthy coating of Slime helps.

I've read about CO2 permeating rubber and I'm pretty well satisfied it happens, but I just haven't seen it myself to any noticeable level. Now, I tend to top up my tires every couple of weeks. Maybe that's because of the CO2. Maybe I'd only have to air up every month or two if I used air or nitrogen. Not meaning to go off in that direction, but I'd never go out of my way at all to use nitrogen.

TT
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
This article, at the very end, speaks to pressure loss with CO2. I once followed their reinflate procedure but now wait until the next day to fix the CO2 loss.

This article addresses this phenomenon as a function of pressure and tube material. It concludes that "the leakage rate of CO2 is huge, and the reason is that it is actually soluble in butyl rubber and is thus not constrained to normal permeation loss, it can transfer straight through the bulk rubber resulting in severe tire pressure loss on the order of a single day." This is what I experience. YRMV depending on tire pressure and volume but this holds true for me with tires up to 47x622....😎

I still use CO2 for field flats because it's just faster.
 

Gordon71

Active Member
I have a box of these, more expensive but 100 flats is more than I hope to have in my life:




Make sure you get tire levers and any other tools you might need.

I'd recommend a lower pressure higher volume pump for a fat tire bike. You'll likely never pump up those tires to 40 psi. This is a better (but more expensive) choice:

That is a really nice hand pump. Thanks for posting. I did have to watch a video to figure it out as there were 0 instructions but it works great.