First timer and asking some honest questions about E-bikes

KidSess

New Member
Region
USA
I have had regular bikes for almost 7 years of my life in my youth. I pretty much know a well bit about regulars bikes because i used to assemble/disassemble them from top to bottom. Fast forward, 12 years later. Bikes have come a long way. I did a bit of research to learn about this new bikes and read reviews about E-Bikes from people who purchased them. I have compare many E-bikes and decided which one is the best for my current situation (Commute/work) for uber eats and my regular job. I have purchased the (CrossCurrent X: Electric Commuter Bike) from Juice.

It is currently Winter time in NYC and it is bitter cold out side.

1. Is there anything i should be aware about this e-bikes? or even in the cold?
2. Any recommendations on reading material to learn more?
3. Does this bike have some known issues that anyone should be aware of?
4. Any good bike insurance i need to know about? looking for one badly.
Any experience and/or information would be greatly appreciated.

a couple of odd things i have seen on videos.

1. putting clear wrap around the battery and using a strap to hold it in place. Which i dont understand why other than not getting wet and maybe hold the battery in place?
 
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Court

Administrator
Staff member
Hey @KidSess, welcome to the forums and ebikes! I grew up with a simple one speed Huffy and eventually got a hardtail mountain bike. Ebikes were pretty complex when I discovered them, but I've gained some knowledge now and will try to answer your questions:
  1. Extreme cold could have two consequences, one is that it could slow the brake fluid down if you have hydraulic brakes... so it would require more hand effort to stop. The second is that it could reduce your usable battery charge capacity. In my experience, it can almost halve the capacity effectively halving your range! One way to get around this is to store the battery separately from the bike when charging and just before you ride. Interestingly, extreme heat is worse for the actual battery chemistry and will shorten the number of full charge cycles you can get... so at least with the cold, it's more of a temporary "stunting" kind of thing, like if a person is cold and they move slower and cannot walk as far :)
  2. You could learn more about Juiced Bikes in my reviews (which all have videos and big writeups) as well as the Juiced Bikes forums. I've done a few intro videos on YouTube and generic guides which you can explore on the channel here. Hope this helps! Also check out ElectricBikeReport.com, Electrek, and other YouTube channels like EMTB Network :D
  3. Great question, I created a special area where people post problems and known issues for their Juiced elecric bikes, but you could also read my review with pros/cons of the model. I haven't covered your exact one, but a similar one from a couple years back.
  4. Check out Velosurance, I haven't been in touch with them for a while but they used to have great options that covered the bike and all of your accessories! Great thinking, since these can be expensive. I've worked with them for my own bikes years ago, never had to file a claim, was happy with their customer support and the overall price and service.
As for your last question, some people tape down or use velcro to secure their battery pack to reduce vibration and noise during off-road use. The semi-integrated batteries that a lot of companies, such as Juiced, use might not fit into the frame as securely since many frames are different and the parts are more affordable vs. premium in terms of quality. The battery for the Crosscurrent I looked at years ago was a Reention Dorado, which can rattle a bit and is semi-integrated. In addition to velcro straps, I've also seen people use neoprene wraps that protect the battery from cold (like a wetsuit!) here's a whole thread about people riding in the cold, with a photo of the wetsuit wrap buried down on page 5. Hope this helps!
 

KidSess

New Member
Region
USA
Hey @KidSess, welcome to the forums and ebikes! I grew up with a simple one speed Huffy and eventually got a hardtail mountain bike. Ebikes were pretty complex when I discovered them, but I've gained some knowledge now and will try to answer your questions:
  1. Extreme cold could have two consequences, one is that it could slow the brake fluid down if you have hydraulic brakes... so it would require more hand effort to stop. The second is that it could reduce your usable battery charge capacity. In my experience, it can almost halve the capacity effectively halving your range! One way to get around this is to store the battery separately from the bike when charging and just before you ride. Interestingly, extreme heat is worse for the actual battery chemistry and will shorten the number of full charge cycles you can get... so at least with the cold, it's more of a temporary "stunting" kind of thing, like if a person is cold and they move slower and cannot walk as far :)
  2. You could learn more about Juiced Bikes in my reviews (which all have videos and big writeups) as well as the Juiced Bikes forums. I've done a few intro videos on YouTube and generic guides which you can explore on the channel here. Hope this helps! Also check out ElectricBikeReport.com, Electrek, and other YouTube channels like EMTB Network :D
  3. Great question, I created a special area where people post problems and known issues for their Juiced elecric bikes, but you could also read my review with pros/cons of the model. I haven't covered your exact one, but a similar one from a couple years back.
  4. Check out Velosurance, I haven't been in touch with them for a while but they used to have great options that covered the bike and all of your accessories! Great thinking, since these can be expensive. I've worked with them for my own bikes years ago, never had to file a claim, was happy with their customer support and the overall price and service.
As for your last question, some people tape down or use velcro to secure their battery pack to reduce vibration and noise during off-road use. The semi-integrated batteries that a lot of companies, such as Juiced, use might not fit into the frame as securely since many frames are different and the parts are more affordable vs. premium in terms of quality. The battery for the Crosscurrent I looked at years ago was a Reention Dorado, which can rattle a bit and is semi-integrated. In addition to velcro straps, I've also seen people use neoprene wraps that protect the battery from cold (like a wetsuit!) here's a whole thread about people riding in the cold, with a photo of the wetsuit wrap buried down on page 5. Hope this helps!
You are amazing Sir, thanks! will read it when i return tomorrow! :D
 

ruffruff

Well-Known Member
Yes, riding in cold weather REALLY decreases battery life. I ride in Mn in the winter and as Court says on really cold days it can be as much as half capacity. They do make battery jackets but I don't have any experience with how well they help.

There is a thread on here where a motor was cutting out at a specific temperature. With further research they found that the battery had a safety cutoff below a certain temp. No idea if your battery/motor has such a thing but worth looking into.

Also, tires are very important when riding on ice or snow. Studded being the best for icy conditions.
Do some research and see how wide and aggressive a tire you can fit on the rim. But like everything, there is a trade off.
You will pay with more rolling resistance the wider the tire.
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
And remember that you can't charge them unless the internal cells are above freezing, or it damages the cells. Maybe 40F is warm enough.
 

theemartymac

Well-Known Member
Further to Court's points; I am largely a fair weather (above freezing) rider, but I did commute to work a few times in November in low single digit Celsius temperatures. I did notice a full 50% range reduction. Where I could get to work AND home (45kms) in summer with at least 40% left in the 19Ah battery, this time I could barely make it to work on a full charge, and I was noticing the power drop off at the 3/4 point. I commute in high assist at 40+kph, so definitely working the bike hard.

I made a battery cover out of an old yoga matt, and it seems to be helping noticeably on my short rides since, although I haven't reproduced a full work commute since completing it. I also make sure the battery stays in the house now before the ride so it has some thermal energy stored up at the start of each ride.

And on the back end, let the battery warm up to reasonable room temp before charging, and make sure your chain lubricants are still viscous in the lowest temps you plan to ride in. Thick lube can mean stiff components, inaccurate shifting, and reduced efficiency.
 

ElevenAD

Well-Known Member
get a cheap neoprene tummy burner from amazon, do NOT cut it! wrap it around the battery as many times as possible, nice and tight,no space between the layers, once you start riding your battery will warm up and the heat will stay in so your range wont suffer as much in the cold.
 

KidSess

New Member
Region
USA
And remember that you can't charge them unless the internal cells are above freezing, or it damages the cells. Maybe 40F is warm enough.
i did not think about that. Good point man.
get a cheap neoprene tummy burner from amazon, do NOT cut it! wrap it around the battery as many times as possible, nice and tight,no space between the layers, once you start riding your battery will warm up and the heat will stay in so your range wont suffer as much in the cold.
does that even work in the cold weather like 40f-50f?

thanks you all for your replies.
What about the brake oil? is there and specific type i should use?
When should i change my Brake pads and which ones should i get if ever?
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Hydraulic brake manufacturers usually specify their proprietary brand of brake fluid. No condensing on DOT3 the way the car market has gone. Buy the brand fluid your hydraulic brakes are.
When the brake handle gets near the handlebar, it is time to adjust the brake pads (cable pull) or replace them. Hydraulic brakes are supposed to be self adjusting.
If you are downhill mountain bike racing then the highest price finned metallic pads are required. If you are puttering around at 8 mph like me, the other kind are quieter. Can't remember the word right now; it begins with an e. Looks like asbestos but it's not.
Brake pads come in different shapes for different brands. No aftermarket vendor (modernbike.com thebikeshopstore.com competitivecyclist.com) sold brake pads for my tektro 2120 brakes , so I went by the picture and bought cheap pads off ebay for a shimano. They fit. That meant I had to take the brake caliper off & look at the pad, though, to match it up and guess. Nobody will show a dimension for a pad, or anything else on the bike except frame, wheels, & tires. Sun, Shimano, Sram, all part pdf files are dimensionless.
About wrapping the battery, I wrapped mine in the plastic foam sheet the battery came from luna in. Similar 1/8" thick foam sheet is used to pack other products. Taped it up with 3m package tape. I use the same foam to pad my seat, since the yuba OEM seat and the selle royale respiro were such bricks. **** cloud 9 won't fit my bike. Riding a mesinger leather seat I salvaged off a $15 bike from Salvation Army. At least it has 2 springs in the back to rock right & left.
 
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ElevenAD

Well-Known Member
i did not think about that. Good point man.

does that even work in the cold weather like 40f-50f?

thanks you all for your replies.
What about the brake oil? is there and specific type i should use?
When should i change my Brake pads and which ones should i get if ever?
yes no worries, it was in the 20sF this morning i was riding around no problem.
 

McCorby

Well-Known Member
What about the brake oil? is there and specific type i should use?
Most hydraulic bicycle brakes use mineral oil. The brake reservoirs located on the handlebar usually specify what fluid should be used.

54A70872-8B82-495E-B44A-88FB61707A93.jpeg
 

KidSess

New Member
Region
USA
Most hydraulic bicycle brakes use mineral oil. The brake reservoirs located on the handlebar usually specify what fluid should be used.

View attachment 77585
i dind't see any specific brand of mineral oil. All i saw it was Tektro on the name of the brakes.

Hydraulic brake manufacturers usually specify their proprietary brand of brake fluid. No condensing on DOT3 the way the car market has gone. Buy the brand fluid your hydraulic brakes are.
When the brake handle gets near the handlebar, it is time to adjust the brake pads (cable pull) or replace them. Hydraulic brakes are supposed to be self adjusting.
If you are downhill mountain bike racing then the highest price finned metallic pads are required. If you are puttering around at 8 mph like me, the other kind are quieter. Can't remember the word right now; it begins with an e. Looks like asbestos but it's not.
Brake pads come in different shapes for different brands. No aftermarket vendor (modernbike.com thebikeshopstore.com competitivecyclist.com) sold brake pads for my tektro 2120 brakes , so I went by the picture and bought cheap pads off ebay for a shimano. They fit. That meant I had to take the brake caliper off & look at the pad, though, to match it up and guess. Nobody will show a dimension for a pad, or anything else on the bike except frame, wheels, & tires. Sun, Shimano, Sram, all part pdf files are dimensionless.
About wrapping the battery, I wrapped mine in the plastic foam sheet the battery came from luna in. Similar 1/8" thick foam sheet is used to pack other products. Taped it up with 3m package tape. I use the same foam to pad my seat, since the yuba OEM seat and the selle royale respiro were such bricks. **** cloud 9 won't fit my bike. Riding a mesinger leather seat I salvaged off a $15 bike from Salvation Army. At least it has 2 springs in the back to rock right & left.
Thanks man, you gave me so much information that it took me a while to get things covered with the time. i do have to get a C9 seat as they say they are really comfortable and my commute is sometimes rough.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
It is currently Winter time in NYC and it is bitter cold out side.

1. Is there anything i should be aware about this e-bikes? or even in the cold?
I haven't seen battery storage and charging discussed as yet...

Lithium batteries shoulld not be stored beolw ~40°F. When the temps dip, I bring ours inside. Riding at lower temps is OK as the bettery will generate enough heat to be OK though a neoprene wrap when it's really cold wouldn't hurt.

As a general rule you'll get longer life out of your battery if you don't discharge it below ~20% or charge it over ~80%. Personally, I try to follow the 20% minimum but often charge to 100% just before I ride. Storing at 100% charge isn't recommended. I try to get the charge to ~50% if I won't be riding for a week or more then top it off just before my ride.

There's a lot of good material here for further study;

Be sure to share your rides with us!
 

KidSess

New Member
Region
USA
Get that insurance if you're parking on the streets of NYC.
yes, i will be getting it soon. it's only about $12 per month. I wont be parking it outside, just in case i get into an accident or anyone else steals it.

I haven't seen battery storage and charging discussed as yet...

Lithium batteries shoulld not be stored beolw ~40°F. When the temps dip, I bring ours inside. Riding at lower temps is OK as the bettery will generate enough heat to be OK though a neoprene wrap when it's really cold wouldn't hurt.

As a general rule you'll get longer life out of your battery if you don't discharge it below ~20% or charge it over ~80%. Personally, I try to follow the 20% minimum but often charge to 100% just before I ride. Storing at 100% charge isn't recommended. I try to get the charge to ~50% if I won't be riding for a week or more then top it off just before my ride.

There's a lot of good material here for further study;

Be sure to share your rides with us!

i see, thanks for sharing. Also, i will always keep my bicycle inside of the home. I never park it outside. I just wanted to make sure that when i am riding it and i park it for a few minutes no one comes to steals it lol.

What kind of neoprene do you guys recommend? my battery is kinda big and idk if it will cover it all or even sure "which area" to cover.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
What kind of neoprene do you guys recommend? my battery is kinda big and idk if it will cover it all or even sure "which area" to cover.
That Juiced ebike does have a 'prominante' battery, doesn't it!

This neoprene cover has been recommended by others on the forum;
Dimensions are in the Product Description.

I've been an avid SCUBA diver for over 50 years and as such have a 'collection' of old wet suits. I cut them up for various projects, like battery sleeves. If you aren't a diver, a local dive shop can get materials for you to make your own battery sleeve.
 

KidSess

New Member
Region
USA
That Juiced ebike does have a 'prominante' battery, doesn't it!

This neoprene cover has been recommended by others on the forum;
Dimensions are in the Product Description.

I've been an avid SCUBA diver for over 50 years and as such have a 'collection' of old wet suits. I cut them up for various projects, like battery sleeves. If you aren't a diver, a local dive shop can get materials for you to make your own battery sleeve.
that is a very good suggestion regarding the local scuba diving shop. I will definitely look into it. Also, i have looked into that battery cover. it is mostly for tubes, sadly.