Fitting a motor to a bicycle, rider and terrain

Mike leroy

Active Member
Preconfigured Pedal Assist Levels (PAL) are designed to conserve battery power. Does it make more sense to configure PALs to hill steepness to optimize the entire power system? Why should power levels be any different than matching gears to hill steepness?

Configure the Pedal Assist Levels (PAL) into the controller. Use Cycle Assist to determine wattage for the desired gears, for the six grades in the following table.

This approach requires buying the BBS02 from a local shop. Make a return trip to customize the PAL settings. I do not see how this can be accomplished from Internet purchases, because you will not know required wattage before ordering the BBS02.

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A power meter will indicate which column in the above table corresponds with your leg strength.

The folks at Cycle Analyst sent this helpful link for power meters. Many options exist according to his article:

"These units don’t actually measure your work effort using strain gauges, but instead rely upon other environmental factors. Thus the name of non-Direct Force Power Meters (DFPM).

PowerCal: The PowerTap PowerCal (offered in both ANT+ and Bluetooth Smart) is a heart-rate strap that also transmits power information. It monitors your heart rate and then uses the rate of change to determine power. While many hard-core power meter users are afraid to even glance at the thing, I found that when you started looking at real-world data, it wasn’t actually all that bad. And in fact, it was far more accurate than you’d expect. In general, I’d recommend this for someone that may be buying a heart rate strap anyway and is interested in power (since you’re basically just spending $50 more, it’s about $99 these days).

iBike: I haven’t tested out the iBike in a few years now. "

Another article using a runners power watch.

This graph provides a reference point. In my case, the best I can hope for is about 2.2mph on the 18% grade. That means balancing will be so difficult that walking the bike uphill is the most likely outcome.
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Mike leroy

Active Member
The folks at Cycle Analyst sent this helpful link for power meters. Many options exist according to his article:

"These units don’t actually measure your work effort using strain gauges, but instead rely upon other environmental factors. Thus the name of non-Direct Force Power Meters (DFPM).

PowerCal: The PowerTap PowerCal (offered in both ANT+ and Bluetooth Smart) is a heart-rate strap that also transmits power information. It monitors your heart rate and then uses the rate of change to determine power. While many hard-core power meter users are afraid to even glance at the thing, I found that when you started looking at real-world data, it wasn’t actually all that bad. And in fact, it was far more accurate than you’d expect. In general, I’d recommend this for someone that may be buying a heart rate strap anyway and is interested in power (since you’re basically just spending $50 more, it’s about $99 these days).

iBike: I haven’t tested out the iBike in a few years now. "