Flat tire

should a novice attempt to fix the rear tire?

  • Take to shop.

    Votes: 3 33.3%
  • Get bike mechanical degree

    Votes: 6 66.7%

  • Total voters
    9

Mark

New Member
Warning to riders who are not very mechanically inclined. If you get a flat on the rear tire
of the 2013 Path, I highly recommend you take it to a good bike shop. It is very difficult to get the tire back
on because of the wire coming out from the hub. I feel there is a good chance of a novice damaging at most the power wire . I had to haul it down to the shop and they said a washer was missing, so I had to order that. Also the flat was from a metal shard sticking up from the inside of the rim.
The only flat I've had that was from an internal source!
On a good note, the spokes seem to be holding up fine...
But I am looking into getting towing from AAA for the rear tire!
update 1/17/16 I am now using Gaadi tubes which almost anybody can change because you do not have to take the tire off!
Mark
 
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biknut

Active Member
I totally agree that there's a very high likelihood of a novice damaging their bike trying to change their tire, but if you want to own a bike, you've got to learn how to do it. People that don't learn to work on their own bikes don't last very long as riders, unless they're married to some sucker that does it for them.

You've got to break some eggs to make real mayonnaise.
 
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Mark

New Member
I rode for a long time without even knowing how to change a flat tire, but after so many
flats, I did force myself to learn that. Of course my old bike had quick release on front and back.
The 2015 Path I think has quick release on the back, so maybe that would make it easier?
Also I wonder if it is easiest to change a flat on the rear, if the bike is upside down, like if you
are stuck on the bike path 3.25 miles from home, or if you can put it on a bike rack like a shop would have?
 

Shea N Encinitas

Active Member
Careful inverting an e-bike, I once severed the brake lead even in soft grass. Usually the display prevents inversion anyway. A foam piece that slips over the grips could be used and carried without adding hardly any weight. I suggest you pull the wheels and swap front to back tires while at home, a dry run to make sure you have all the tools and process down. -S
 

Mark

New Member
Careful inverting an e-bike, I once severed the brake lead even in soft grass. Usually the display prevents inversion anyway. A foam piece that slips over the grips could be used and carried without adding hardly any weight. I suggest you pull the wheels and swap front to back tires while at home, a dry run to make sure you have all the tools and process down. -S
My 2013 Path has no display, I only had to remove the mirror to turn the bike upside down.
It was not to hard to get the tire off, getting the rear tire back on seemed very hard and I would definitely
not want to try out on the bike path. I would almost like to pay a bike mechanic to show me the whole process.
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
Warning to riders who are not very mechanically inclined. If you get a flat on the rear tire
of the 2013 Path, I highly recommend you take it to a good bike shop. It is very difficult to get the tire back
on because of the wire coming out from the hub. I feel there is a good chance of a novice damaging at most the power wire . I had to haul it down to the shop and they said a washer was missing, so I had to order that. Also the flat was from a metal shard sticking up from the inside of the rim.
The only flat I've had that was from an internal source!
On a good note, the spokes seem to be holding up fine...
But I am looking into getting towing from AAA for the rear tire!
Mark

Some areas have bike coverage through AAA. Not here. These guys advertise the service.

http://www.betterworldclub.com/roadside-assistance/auto-roadside-assistance/
 

Brambor

Well-Known Member
Even if you have the road assistance it is pretty annoying to call and wait.

I have always had the assistance through my bike insurance. I have had about 10 flats in a year. I learned how to fix them, carry spare innertubes and tools. Fix it and keep going.
I never called for assistance.
 

JoePah

Well-Known Member
Every adult needs to learn how to change a tire... Even eBikes are very repairable, once you know how. If you don't know how, have your LBS take you through all the steps..

The biggest difference is that you will need a few extra tye wraps, an open end wrench to loosen the axle nuts, a screwdriver or allen wrench to remove the torque plate, and a knife to cut the old tye wraps.

You have to pay attention to the wires and orientation, but hey that's what cell phone cameras are for!

Once you have the wheel off the bike, removing the tire and tube is very simple.. If you don't fancy patching a tube just carry a new one. Installing the tire just take a little thumb muscle... In florida the tires are so pliant you don't even need a tire iron to install them.

My first bike A2B had the worst tyres known to man... Kendas 20x3.. at least 5 flats a year...
 
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Paul E.

Active Member
When I had the first flat from a thorn and patched the tube, I installed Rhinodillo liners at the same time. A few days ago I had a twig with a thorn get stuck in a tire again but no flat.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
...and don't forget using a "bullet-proof" tire like the Bontrager H5 Hard Case Ultimate.
for the price of these e-bikes something like that should already be included.
 

Mark

New Member
Thanks for the tip! I will look for that tire when mine wear out. Also I did add
a thorn resistant tube when I had the flat.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
I have subsequently discovered some others: Schwalbe, Specialized, Continental... there's a world of flat resistant tires out there. All I can tell you is I'm not fixing any flats on the trail, whether I have to walk home or call a friend with a truck!

That's why I'm going to use the most protection I can!
 
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Brambor

Well-Known Member
I don't have total experience with the various puncture resistant options but I'll say that many of the flats I had last year would be hard to stop by anything. The nails or industrial staples I found in my tire would make it through just about any bike rubber I have seen.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
My experience has been with goathead thorns. If you can get them out before they draw air you're usually ok, so I think flat resistant tires will help me. Liners have helped me in the past. (I'm going to run the factory provided tires until they die ... I'm considering using slime and/or liners until then)
 
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Brambor

Well-Known Member
After reading Ravi's 3 flats that he says were slow leaks and he managed to bike home or to work I wished I had such luck. Most of my flats were straight empties. :)
 

NoDTMF

Active Member
Man, I had a weird piece of metal go in the top of the tire and out through the side, no fixing that tube. I even wondering about the tire since it got sidewall damage. Any wisdom on this?
(it was my rear tire, my bike is mid mount motor, so that made changing simple, thankfully)
 

opimax

Well-Known Member
I have had 1 pinch flat (that I know of) and since running my tire at or near max 55 in my case none. I also want as little resistance as possible so I can get all I can from the motor for speed... I do live on paved trails but don't change even for less than ideal conditions. I have had a flat or two in some very rural area and didn't enjoy coming home at 4am instead of 9pm

When do these high tech no air energy return tires become the norm?