Flat tire

should a novice attempt to fix the rear tire?

  • Take to shop.

    Votes: 3 33.3%
  • Get bike mechanical degree

    Votes: 6 66.7%

  • Total voters
    9

Brambor

Well-Known Member
actually you can go tubeless today. Go to your LBS and get it set up. I'm thinking about it.
 

Mark

New Member
I this because you don't fix your own flats? I've never been held up for more than 20 minutes. -S
Well, it would be hard to fix a flat on the rear tire in the dark. I think my next E Bike will have the Bosch system, in which
the back tire is just like any regular bike, much easier to change. Currie is carrying some of these bikes now. The only drawback is
they cost about twice the price of other Currie bikes.
 

Shea N Encinitas

Active Member
With my Dash (now sold), a rear hub motor design, I first swapped the front and rear tire at home to get a feel for it, and to make sure I had all the right tools in my bag. It helped to put the bike in the highest gear first so the cassette can be cleared from the chain/derailleur more easily. That bike also required the removal and replacement of the electrical connection and one clip holding those wires. When replacing the wheel I would first position the chain & derailleur and then concentrate on aligning the disc brake to the caliper, and the dropouts which are keyed and can only be oriented with the cable harness pointing forward - a bit awkward for sure, a curse word or two seems to help. Reconnect the electrics, replace the small clip & tighten the quick release after confirming the axle is fully seated in the dropouts. I call that a dry run and have learned to be patient during the process, find a grassy area in the shade if possible. Sure feels good to be back up and on your way. Good luck - Shea
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
actually you can go tubeless today. Go to your LBS and get it set up. I'm thinking about it.
I am totally down with flat prevention. My RX29 came with 57-622 folding tires jammed on 19mm rims.

So, do you know, can tubeless work with any tires/wheels or is something specific needed?

And, what will the benefit be to going tubeless?
 

Ann M.

Well-Known Member
Friends of mine who are avid off road cyclists like it since you fix a flat like you would on a car; no pulling a tube. However, if its a really bad flat, they end up walking. Now with that said; verify it with your hardcore mountain bikers. My go to solution is prevention: thick thorn resistant tubes and tire liners with a possible upgrade of the tire quality. It works; regular commuters go through all kinds of garbage in the bike lanes or park trails and they don't come back to the shop constantly with a flat.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
Friends of mine who are avid off road cyclists like it since you fix a flat like you would on a car; no pulling a tube. However, if its a really bad flat, they end up walking. Now with that said; verify it with your hardcore mountain bikers. My go to solution is prevention: thick thorn resistant tubes and tire liners with a possible upgrade of the tire quality. It works; regular commuters go through all kinds of garbage in the bike lanes or park trails and they don't come back to the shop constantly with a flat.
Your suggestions sound very wise ... the voice of experience!
Thanks!
 

Marko

Active Member
With my Dash (now sold), a rear hub motor design, I first swapped the front and rear tire at home to get a feel for it, and to make sure I had all the right tools in my bag. It helped to put the bike in the highest gear first so the cassette can be cleared from the chain/derailleur more easily. That bike also required the removal and replacement of the electrical connection and one clip holding those wires. When replacing the wheel I would first position the chain & derailleur and then concentrate on aligning the disc brake to the caliper, and the dropouts which are keyed and can only be oriented with the cable harness pointing forward - a bit awkward for sure, a curse word or two seems to help. Reconnect the electrics, replace the small clip & tighten the quick release after confirming the axle is fully seated in the dropouts. I call that a dry run and have learned to be patient during the process, find a grassy area in the shade if possible. Sure feels good to be back up and on your way. Good luck - Shea
Pretty much the same strategy I have. At one point I was carrying a replacement tube but one option could be self-adhesive patches. The problem with patching one the road is finding the leak. For small leaks I usually use submerging in water which is of course not feasible on the road. The thru axle I have in the Turbo is extremely easy, just need to loosen one hex bolt and pull out the axle. A derailleur with a clutch would also be helpful.
At one point I was constantly with a flat because someone kept throwing pins on the road, the kind you see on this vid: http://www.schwalbe.com/en/unplattbar.html
 
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opimax

Well-Known Member
In my case, 2 things, I haven't changed a tire since my youth when all you needed was your hands to get the tire off. I have never seen a balloon style tire off the rim or seen a the mechanic replace one. I also have no back , I cannot lift my Stromer onto the bike rack, that is why I got married , sometimes on good days I can help her :) . I do not think I could remove the rear tire physically at this point. I am not sure I could even remove the front wheel by myself.

So no I don' t fix flats. I have never had disc brakes on a bike before. I have never had to work w/a derailleur before, the internal 3 speed on my Huffy was sealed. My purchase shop went out of business, no training or after hours classes were given as some shops do. My bike is under warranty somewhat ( do not know where a Stromer dealer is in the DC area) I am not going to work w/the rear wheel at all until that warranty is gone. I have enough issues w/2 bikes that I am having a hard time getting repaired as is so I will not add to my problems and learn on this bike.

I don't understand the poll unless the word get should be got???
 

Shea N Encinitas

Active Member
Having no back sucks, so I'm hearing you on that. Should you wish to explore a fix at some point keep in mind that removing the battery (if possible) will reduce the weight. Also the kickstand on some bikes can actually be used while wrestling the wheel in and out, or the work can even be done with a bike on it's side. Good luck! -S