Flat tires - how much of a problem should I expect?

5thumbs

Member
This Stan's NoTube Sealant. Do you inject to help prevent flats, or do you carry and inject if you get a flat then fill up with air? Thanks
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Personally I don't use or need to use a tire sealant, I don't get that many flats. Many folks do use sealant and I hoped someone would post the best procedures for it's use. Thanks @spencer.justin for your input and advise! I did use Slime on tractor tires and found it fouled the valve badly.
 

Brian(J)

Active Member
I am happy to report that I have zero flats on the stock CTS tires that came with my E3 Dash 1,600 miles ago. I did join the crowd in buying the Schwalbe Marathons but they've just been hanging in the garage for the last year.
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
Use Stan's NoTube Sealant injected into the tubes. It is the best sealant on the market. Stan's recommends 2 ounces per wheel. I have been using Stan's for over 10 years and have learned that 4-6 ounces extends the life of the performance to over 9 months.

I went to Stan's site and didn't see anything about injecting the product into tubes... only into tubeless tires, specifically the ones that Stan's has helped design and sells for mountain bikes.

Can you provide a link on how to install into tubes?
 

spencer.justin

New Member
You remove the valve core and pour the Stan's in with the 2 ounce bottle that is sold. The end of the bottle fits right into a Schrader valve perfect. On a presta valve it requires an injector that Stan's sells. It is put in to prevent flats and not as an emergency device.
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
Okay more questions:

1. Should the inner tube be fully inflated, partially inflated, or not inflated at all prior to installing the solution?
2. Do you need to do the bouncing tire routine as they show in their tubeless installation videos after the Stan's is injected and the valve core is replaced?
3. Anything else to do to complete the process?
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
@JR The ebike shop, eSpokes, that recommended the M+ tires suggested using slime as you mentioned. Get a flat and try to get some in the tube at that point. I have used this stuff, once, and it worked. I carry it with the X3, which now has fat tubes and liners. This stuff has horrible reviews on Amazon. It's really hard to recommend. This was an answer to 'How to use it" on Yahoo:

Best Answer:How to properly use it? A) Open lid on trash can. B) Toss it in. C) Buy tires with some kind of inner-liner built into them. D) Keep tires inflated properly.

seal.jpg

The problem here is mostly thorns. Basic tires that came with 2 bikes have barely lasted 10 miles into every ride without a thorn. A flat on every ride. Often the leak was slow until I removed the thorn. Most of the thorns broke off, leaving a sharp end in the tire and tube. Not pulling them out instantly repunctured the new tube, so do check the tire before putting a new tube in the tire. The M+ and Armadillos on a road bike (700x23) have worked reliably.

But, it's like what you said about a wrench. How much to carry.
 

spencer.justin

New Member
Okay more questions:

1. Should the inner tube be fully inflated, partially inflated, or not inflated at all prior to installing the solution?
2. Do you need to do the bouncing tire routine as they show in their tubeless installation videos after the Stan's is injected and the valve core is replaced?
3. Anything else to do to complete the process?


1. The valve core has to be removed to pour the juice in so that would mean no air in the tube.
2. no bouncing needed... that is to set the bead of a tubeless tire to the rim
3. No, just pour 2-6 ounces in and then air up and GO
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
The problem with a slimed or juiced tire or tube is in the maintenance or repair. Checking the pressure or adding to it can foul the valve, pressure gauge and pump. Only makes sense given the stuff is meant to plug air holes.
 

spencer.justin

New Member
The problem with a slimed or juiced tire or tube is in the maintenance or repair. Checking the pressure or adding to it can foul the valve, pressure gauge and pump. Only makes sense given the stuff is meant to plug air holes.

True with most... but as a bike shop employee/owner with over 10 years experience with Stan's it is not the case with this product.
 

5thumbs

Member
Spencer. Thank you for this "off label" use of this product in a tube. i am going to give it a try.
1. Deflate tire
2. Remove core
3. Pour in Stan's product
4. Replace core and fill tire
5. "Go"
6. ? You mention this should be repeated every few months if you use 2 ounces, but if you pour in 4-6 ounces the tire can be used for 9 months. Then what, do you just replace the tube?

Thanks again. I will try this
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
1. The valve core has to be removed to pour the juice in so that would mean no air in the tube.
2. no bouncing needed... that is to set the bead of a tubeless tire to the rim
3. No, just pour 2-6 ounces in and then air up and GO

As someone with no mechanical ability, this sounds complicated to me. About the same as changing a tube....

...both are beyond my ability level!
 

Mark_0

New Member
Both front a rear wheels on an ST2 are really easy to remove. The rear one has an extra clip that disconnects the power from the motor. The help section in the app has pictures to show you exactly how to remove it. The tire comes off really easily compared to a lightweight road bike - in fact when deflated it simply falls off.

I had a puncture after 600 miles. A 3 inch screw went straight through the tire making big hole and instantly blew out the tube. Ironically I don't think that would have happened on my road bike as the tire is so much narrower. But of course my road bike gets punctured with the smallest thorn that I doubt would ever trouble the huge thick tires on the Stromer.

I carry a spare tube a small set of tools and a CO2 pump. That'll let you fix a puncture in 10 minutes. Rather than worry and wait for the inevitable puncture just try it at home. It really is easy. And actually much easier than messing around with slime.

The Schwalbe site has details of what tube to buy for the tire you have. The specification for your tire is written on the tire itself so it is easy to identify.
 

bikerjohn

Well-Known Member
DO NOT USE SLIME!.. any decent shop worth walking into should tell you this. Just as other folks in this thread have mentioned it clogs and it's performance fades very quickly. Use Stan's NoTube Sealant injected into the tubes. It is the best sealant on the market. Stan's recommends 2 ounces per wheel. I have been using Stan's for over 10 years and have learned that 4-6 ounces extends the life of the performance to over 9 months. So basically each spring you "recharge your system" by replacing the tubes and doing it again.

As far as additional protection you can use tire liners and thorn resistant tubes. I personally put all my faith into Stan's and do not effect my ride quality by adding liners and TR tubes that can stiffen the tires in an undesirable way.

Note. I have no experience with the Marathon tire but there is no way I am changing out the Big Bens for something else. I have never meet a tire that can preform at the levels this tire does. I can take 28 mph, 90 degree corners on a narrow 2 lane residential neighborhood with the bike leaned at angles lower than 45 degrees. THAT IS SOME SERIOUS GRIP is this genre of tire.
Funny! My experience using Stan's is exactly opposite your experience. Stan's No Tube Sealant broke down, clumped and separated inside my tubes!
I tried Stan's one year, having read endorsements like yours.The stuff was pricier than slime so it must be better -right? NO! I noticed the compound broke down in the tube over Winter storage. The following Spring I could feel rubbery clumps of coagulated sealant within my tubes. Stan's No-Tube Sealant compound had coagulated inside of the tubes over the Winter. This became a noticeable problem with wheel balance. The resulting condition after a year in tubes was rubber clumps and an ineffective "whey" type liquid. It became necessary to replace the tubes to correct the wheel balance. I have never had a similar situation using Slime.
 

bikerjohn

Well-Known Member
John, do you use the recommended amount of slime, more, less? And do you have any problems with wobble at speed?

I've used Michelin's on non-e-bikes, very high quality tires!
I estimate the quantity of Slime using the graduation marks on the bottle in the recommended amount.
 

bikerjohn

Well-Known Member
Interesting conflicting recommendations on the use of certain brands of no leak tube compounds. Having had actual experience using Stan's and Slime, Slime has proven multi-year dependability.
spencer.justin states: "...4-6 ounces extends the life of the performance to over 9 months. So basically each spring you "recharge your system" by replacing the tubes and doing it again."
So it is clear that Stan's no-leak reliability is basically good for one year of use ("9 months"). The compound did not over-winter well in tubes.
Slime, on the other hand, does seem to hold up well year to year.
->here is documentation of the problem I experienced using "Stan's":
http://www.bikejournal.com/blog.asp?rname=bikerjohn&cdate=8/20/2013
 
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5thumbs

Member
Went 1000 miles on a ST1 and no flats, then got 2 flats in less than 100 miles, both on the rear tire. Put together a kit and practiced removal of the rear tire so hopefully now I can address on the road.
  • 19mm wrench to remove rear tire
  • tire levers (optional)
  • 5mm hex for removal front tire (maybe 6mm)
  • Knife to remove 2 zip ties that secure rear wheel hub wires
  • spare tube and/or patch kit
  • air source
  • zip ties to secure rear wheel hub wires to frame (believe me, you don't want those ripping out while riding or changing wheel)
  • phillips head screwdriver. If you plan to turn the bike upside down to change the rear wheel, you may want to loosen ST1 display to swing it out of the way so it does not get all scratched up.
Along with the nuts and 2 locking washers on each side, on the brake side of the rear wheel there is a spacing washer that covers the rear hub wires. On the drive train side, there is a short sleeve that inserts over the bold and into cassette. Both the spacing washer and sleeve can easily fall off the wheel so be sure not to loose those.
IMG_2531.JPG

Oh, I found the puncture to be on the INSIDE of the tube. I searched the rim for spokes/sharp edges and could not find any.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
Went 1000 miles on a ST1 and no flats, then got 2 flats in less than 100 miles, both on the rear tire. Put together a kit and practiced removal of the rear tire so hopefully now I can address on the road.
  • 19mm wrench to remove rear tire
  • tire levers (optional)
  • 5mm hex for removal front tire (maybe 6mm)
  • Knife to remove 2 zip ties that secure rear wheel hub wires
  • spare tube and/or patch kit
  • air source
  • zip ties to secure rear wheel hub wires to frame (believe me, you don't want those ripping out while riding or changing wheel)
  • phillips head screwdriver. If you plan to turn the bike upside down to change the rear wheel, you may want to loosen ST1 display to swing it out of the way so it does not get all scratched up.
Along with the nuts and 2 locking washers on each side, on the brake side of the rear wheel there is a spacing washer that covers the rear hub wires. On the drive train side, there is a short sleeve that inserts over the bold and into cassette. Both the spacing washer and sleeve can easily fall off the wheel so be sure not to loose those.View attachment 3250
Oh, I found the puncture to be on the INSIDE of the tube. I searched the rim for spokes/sharp edges and could not find any.

Wow! That's a serious road-side repair kit. Takes some determination (and a bit of mechanical skill) to tackle a rear-tire flat on that bike!

I'm all thumbs, ;) couldn't do it!
 

Llcjay

Member
As I ponder my purchase of an ST1 or ST2, can you share your opinion/feedback on how often I can expect to get a flat tire, and if I will be able to repair it myself if it happens with me miles away from home?

By the way, the local bike shop (Bike Attack) told me that they can provide special tire treatments at the time of purchase, which would all but ensure me not getting a flat tire... Is this correct? Is this something standard, and/or a tire treatment I might receive from other bike shops?
Stromer tires and tubes are excellent. Doubt your local shop will have the same quality. Order a set on line so u have them ready