Folding commuter bike

womble74

New Member
Region
United Kingdom
What started as a simple exploration of the gocycle and then the carbo is starting to quickly spirel down the hole that is known as google..

Like many others, I suspect, I'm starting to conssider what my final mile commute starts to look like as we come out of lockdown in the UK ...

So in the absence of private electric scooters being legalised yet in the UK, my eye turned to folding ebikes and so the online search started with the Brompton then the gocycle GX, and then a Carbo at which piont the wider world of what looks to be close imations starts to open up such as ebroh passion and onebot s6, to name just a few.

What I thought might be a narrow set of choices has now widened and I'm feeling overwhemlmed by potential choices and thinking about not paying over the odds...

I'd be travelling by train, before hoping onto the bike - so weight and folded size is important and to an extent looks - the brompton just looks dated to me, while the gogcycle styling has appeal but then those other brands such as the carbo etc also have an appeal that makes me think the gocyle is overpriced..

What is difficult to make sense of is wider independent reviews/group comparisions - those few that I've seen have focused on the big names; does any body have personal experience/thoughts or equally can point me to any reliable online resources.

Also concioius that 2021 has just started, and are we likely to see any new models in the next few months (I'm not under pressure to rush and buy something today - so would be happy to wait for a few months).
 

WattsUpDude

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
San Francisco, Bay Area
BESV has a few great looking and light-weight folding designs. Or you can opt for something like the Tern Vektron which is a standard but not so light-weight. I think the Vektron D8 is a really good value.
 

Dewey

Well-Known Member
The Wisper 806 with the torque sensor is a good electric folding bike, and is average weight for the type at 21kg, the Wisper website indicates it is out of stock until March but Rutland Cycling show them in stock and they’re a good chain so I’d ask if you can take one for a test ride https://wisperbikes.com/shop/e-bikes/folding-ebikes/wisper-806-folding-electric-bike-2020/ https://www.rutlandcycling.com/bike...grade-2020-375wh-folding-electric-bike_471812

If the rack battery doesn’t appeal, consider the Woosh Rambletta with the monoshock https://wooshbikes.co.uk/?rambletta, or the Forme Buxton Pro E https://formebikes.co.uk/buxton-pro-e.html, but both have more basic cadence pedal assist sensors.

If want to get rider opinions try asking on the UK Pedelecs or Cycling UK forums
 
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harryS

Well-Known Member
Why no discussion on this bike?
(RECON 4" fat tire folder)
Not the kind of bike I would want carry onto a train. In fact, I've never folded my fat tire folder, but I do have a hitch rack that will hold it.

20x4.0" Tire vs a 20 x1.75 Tire
tires.JPEG
 
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womble74

New Member
Region
United Kingdom
The OP is in the UK. Recon Bikes only ship to the US & Canada. The three bikes I mentioned are from British brands.
As you say, I'm in the UK - I am open to shipping a bike in (assuming they ship to the UK). And equally struggle with what are often 'local' versions of a bike (with a premium on top) which appear identical to those on the like of Aliexpress.

@Law - Ignoring the shipping challenge with the Recon, it doesn't appear to be commuter friendly for a train journey and at 31 kg over 10kg heavier than I'd view as the upper range of the weight I'd like to consider. But thanks for the suggestion.
 
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tomjasz

Well-Known Member
I don't think there are any unpowered fat tire folders. Who would want to ride such a monstrosity w/o a motor?
Well, I see scores of the unpowered fat bikes every day here. Today they were out in the snow. Not deep and no motor.
I have a full-sized FB in my shop. I hate it. Powered or unpowered. I want to try a 20". I suspect I'm peeing into the wind, but I'll learn something.

WTF a "tone detector" calls this "sad". How about 'frank".
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
I wasn't speaking of motorless 26" non-folding fat tire bikes with light alloy wheels, folding bead tires and weight savings applied everywhere, I see the occasional very fit riders with them coming thru in the summer, but I'm not out there in winter.

I am thinking of 20" fat tire bikes. The little Mongoosers sold for kids. I don't see the kids riding them at all. They know what sucks. And you won't find any that fold.
 
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vincent

Well-Known Member
i think you are probably looking at the right ones with the carbo and gocycle, not sure how reliable both brands would be so if it was me would go with whichever one has a good shop that sells it
not sure what ebikes are availble there to suggest others

seems like qualisports has some light folders but dont know if they ship there
 

ki11a

Well-Known Member
Check out the qualisports folding bikes, they are pretty nifty...they have smaller folders too that can be moved while folded easier.

I had the Dolphin, it was a great commuter before someone decided they liked it too and stole it :/
 

NoHills

New Member
Region
USA
I too started out looking at the Gocycle, and quickly getting caught in the web of the web. Just yesterday I came across the Carbo. (Not sure where it was hiding.) I chatted with both companies. The Gocycle wants $700 for replacement batteries-yikes! They seem to be aiming for the 'design trumps money and ease of repair, and everything else' buyer. (They do look flawless.) I kept looking because the thin tires seemed for urban riding only, and I hoped to find a bike which could handle off road. They also were perhaps less able to accommodate North American buyers. Carbo seems to have made a deliberate effort to build an owner-repairable bike. They assemble and ship from Canada, Europe, and Asia. And I found at least one bricks and mortar shop in the US which sells them, so perhaps there are others. I still feel in over my head, as a novice, and welcome any corrections or input. So far, none of the other bikes I've found are light enough or fold small enough for my needs.
 

Marsha4dog

New Member
Region
USA
I too started out looking at the Gocycle, and quickly getting caught in the web of the web. Just yesterday I came across the Carbo. (Not sure where it was hiding.) I chatted with both companies. The Gocycle wants $700 for replacement batteries-yikes! They seem to be aiming for the 'design trumps money and ease of repair, and everything else' buyer. (They do look flawless.) I kept looking because the thin tires seemed for urban riding only, and I hoped to find a bike which could handle off road. They also were perhaps less able to accommodate North American buyers. Carbo seems to have made a deliberate effort to build an owner-repairable bike. They assemble and ship from Canada, Europe, and Asia. And I found at least one bricks and mortar shop in the US which sells them, so perhaps there are others. I still feel in over my head, as a novice, and welcome any corrections or input. So far, none of the other bikes I've found are light enough or fold small enough for my needs.
I too looked at the Gocycle plus many other folding ebikes. Most are too heavy for me. Then i found the Carbo which is actually much lighter. It looks awesome but I haven’t seem a lot of reviews do it plus the delivery time is long. I am so confused And overwhelmed,
 
What started as a simple exploration of the gocycle and then the carbo is starting to quickly spirel down the hole that is known as google..

Like many others, I suspect, I'm starting to conssider what my final mile commute starts to look like as we come out of lockdown in the UK ...

So in the absence of private electric scooters being legalised yet in the UK, my eye turned to folding ebikes and so the online search started with the Brompton then the gocycle GX, and then a Carbo at which piont the wider world of what looks to be close imations starts to open up such as ebroh passion and onebot s6, to name just a few.

What I thought might be a narrow set of choices has now widened and I'm feeling overwhemlmed by potential choices and thinking about not paying over the odds...

I'd be travelling by train, before hoping onto the bike - so weight and folded size is important and to an extent looks - the brompton just looks dated to me, while the gogcycle styling has appeal but then those other brands such as the carbo etc also have an appeal that makes me think the gocyle is overpriced..

What is difficult to make sense of is wider independent reviews/group comparisions - those few that I've seen have focused on the big names; does any body have personal experience/thoughts or equally can point me to any reliable online resources.

Also concioius that 2021 has just started, and are we likely to see any new models in the next few months (I'm not under pressure to rush and buy something today - so would be happy to wait for a few months).
I've had a 20 inch folder, and a couple of Bromptons (including an electric kit from Grin). There's only one choice if you're using mass transportation. Brompton. Trust me, there is no competition. It looks dated because the general design IS dated. It works and is surprisingly robust, why change it? And they've been around for decades, so most parts are readily available from multiple sources.
 

DavidSamson

New Member
Region
USA
Hello:
Writing from the US but my son lives in London. Two possibilities available in the UK: the Flit 16 (headquartered in Cambridge) and the Volt Axis (London). The Flit 16 is lightweight (15 kg), folds small and has a rear hub motor controlled by pedal torque-sensor. I own a Yamaha Cross Core mid drive with torque sensing and I find the pedal assist to be immediately responsive. Haven't ridden the Flit 16 so I don't know how responsive it feels. It has a single gear so you'd need the 4th or 5th level of assist for hills. The Volt Axis is an 8-speed mid-drive folder that weighs a bit less than 22 kg. Multiple speeds and mid drive gives you many options for speed, level of assist and climbing capability. If you're looking for a multimodal commuter and are sensitive to weight, I'd recommend the Flit 16. A test ride would be a good idea.
Good luck.