Frey CC

TomD

Well-Known Member
Really guys don't waste your money on eggrider. If you're going to throw a hundred bucks at tuning better to put that toward the controller upgrade. At most I would invest $10 in the programming cable if you want to tweak some settings but otherwise you're just throwing money away in my opinion.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
Really guys don't waste your money on eggrider. If you're going to throw a hundred bucks at tuning better to put that toward the controller upgrade. At most I would invest $10 in the programming cable if you want to tweak some settings but otherwise you're just throwing money away in my opinion.

Tom does your CC now have Pushkars controller installed?
 

Ebike Addict

New Member
Really guys don't waste your money on eggrider. If you're going to throw a hundred bucks at tuning better to put that toward the controller upgrade. At most I would invest $10 in the programming cable if you want to tweak some settings but otherwise you're just throwing money away in my opinion.
I have been riding my CC for about 500 kms using the stock display (Bafang DP C18) and for about 1000 kms using the EggRider V2 and if I can help it I will never go back to the DP C18. This is for the following reasons:

  1. The EggRider offers the capability to tweak the controller parameters directly from your cell phone. This includes the Basic, Pedal, Throttle settings for both the Eco and Sport modes and the Torque settings common to both modes. I have not used the USB cable, but I read in a couple of posts that only the Sport mode settings can be tweaked with the cable/laptop. I am not sure if this is completely true, but if it is, it is a serious limitation.
  2. The EggRider provides real-time data not available from the DP C18. In particular, the Wh/km or Wh/mile, depending on the chosen units, is very useful. It is a measurement of the depletion rate of the battery capacity per unit distance. This measurement tells you a lot about the bike performance. EggRider measures that as you ride and presents its instantaneous digital value on the display and provides an average at the end of the ride. You can use it to evaluate the battery depletion rate as a function of environmental factors, such as wind, type of surface, hill grade, etc. You can also use it to measure how much you improve the battery depletion rate through your own pedaling effort. If you are so inclined to adjust some of the controller parameters, you can immediately measure the impact it has on the performance; it will likely require you to stop, adjust parameter(s), go and repeat. Now try to do that with a cable that requires to disconnect the DP C18 and connect to a laptop; possible but not very efficient. The EggRider data brings you from a realm of subjective impressions about the bike performance to a realm of hard objectives measurements that you can compare between rides. What is not to like about that!
  3. The EggRider provides average speed and riding time measurements while you move as opposed to the DP C18 overall average speed and riding time, which are meaningless numbers if you had to stop several times during the ride.
  4. At the end of a ride, the EggRider provides plots of various instantaneous quantities such as voltage level, current usage, speed, battery %, as a function of the distance covered or riding time. I found the plot of the current usage especially useful to get better insights into the functioning of the controller for various PAS levels or throttle usage.
  5. Having said all that, the EggRider is not perfect. My main complain about it is that it is attempting to be everything for all applications, meaning to cover various types of controllers and cell phones operating systems. It becomes a monumental software development effort that comes with its occasional bugs and idiosyncrasies. However, I think that George Banea and his software development team should be commended for their effort to bring to the market an innovative and useful product.
  6. At around $100 the EggRider is not cheap but considering all the functionality and data it provides, it is not expensive either. In my opinion, it was worth every penny.
 

TomD

Well-Known Member
Good points, I was speaking more in terms of being able to tune the motor so wouldn't get eggrider just for that, but if you value those other benefits it would be worth it. I prefer a larger display i can actually see with sunglasses that shows me voltage, watts, and speed. The DCP-18 does that better than any other display without having to resort to my phone.
 

Ebike Addict

New Member
Good points, I was speaking more in terms of being able to tune the motor so wouldn't get eggrider just for that, but if you value those other benefits it would be worth it. I prefer a larger display i can actually see with sunglasses that shows me voltage, watts, and speed. The DCP-18 does that better than any other display without having to resort to my phone.
Yes I agree. The EggRider display is way too small and I cannot read it with my polarized sunglasses. I need to use the dashboard on my cell phone and then the ride gets limited by the cell phone battery capacity. I hope they will address that shortcoming in a near future.
 

AndZab

New Member
Nice looking bike you got there, ha, cleaner than mine at the moment. My battery does drop 5% or more initially, more so if it's been resting after a full charge and quite normal I think. If I am pushing the bike hard it can also drop in big chunks, then recover somewhat after I take a break. I'm used to this from riding my Bafang BBS01 so doesn't concern me.

I am not sure why my range seems lower, but I like to ride faster so I think that is a factor. Thing's aren't so flat here either, so maybe there is more up and down than I realize. But lately I'm just not worrying about it as I don't need the range for my 20 mile errands and I still have 50% battery to throttle it up the steep 700' hill and get home with 20% left. I will probably get a spare eventually and that might highlight if my original battery is lacking, but I don't think so.

As far as rattles, I have always had some intermittent noises and couldn't figure out where they were coming from. I think the cranks might rattle a little. I notice it most when I go over bumps. I suppose it could also be the front and/or rear suspension, although my front suspension bikes don't make these noises. The battery doesn't seem to be loose and it doesn't make rattle when I shake it.

Hello Tom, I read your problems about miles range.
I have the same problem, not about long range but about steep hills, even more power-consuming.
I would look at mounting a second battery on the rear rack. You can couple the 2 batteries with an "ideal diode" circuit (this is vital, common diodes do not work well)
Ideal_Diode.jpg
You can put the second battery inside a good little bag, see here a red one, like your bike
p11_pic5.jpg
I'm testing the concept on this ebike
IMG_20200809_192600.jpg
In my case I'm developing a 48V 15Ah battery made with 21700 cells (13S3P layout)
This is because I can well cover all the bottom of the bag (with 18650 cells I waste vertical space)

Hope to be useful !
Regards
 
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smorgasbord

Well-Known Member
I like the EggRider because I can use my phone as a display, and then it double-duties with RideWithGPS to provide map/directions. Having both a big bike display and a phone is too much, IMHO.