Fuji E-Bikes - New Dealer Looking to get Oriented

PortCityMopeds

New Member
Good morning all,
Steve here with Port City Mopeds in Portsmouth, NH. You can check us out at www.portsmouthmopeds.com. As the name suggests, we're typically focused on (gas) moped and scooter repair and sales. We've been in the business for 10+ years, and are just now (considering) adding electric bicycles to our product line.

Me and my staff are pretty darn good as far as wrench-turning goes, and we're acquainted with a variety of motorbikes - moped, scooter, motorcycle, European & Asian, vintage and contemporary. We've got hobby-level experience only when it comes to bicycle (and ebike) repair and services, but we're pretty technically capable and I'm confident in our ability to learn these new machines and provide excellent quality service.

I ordered a handful of Fuji e-bikes at the end of last season. https://www.fujibikes.com/usa/bikes/electric/. I got a bit of a sample pack of the more affordable units - E-Crosstown in men's and women's, E-Traverse M&W, and an E-Nevada.

I have to say I am quite happy with the products. While they may not be perfect, or the top of the line product, I think their price points are great, customers will be attracted to them, and frankly I think the build quality, fit and finish is all at least "good" if not better. Importantly, Fuji is a name folks recognize, which gives some confidence and brand recognition which helps with sales.

Personally, I've been in love with the products after some "rigorous product testing" :). I'm 31 and in decent shape... not particularly active but I've always loved bicycling, and everything on two wheels. I've only ever bicycled recreationally and casually, usually owning older Motobecane road bikes as I have an affinity for the brand, like vintage styling, and the old road bikes just work for me. More avid and current bicycle enthusiasts may be used to the luxuries and amenities of a more modern bike, but form my perspective, I went from vintage tech to high tech overnight! These things have hydraulic disc brake front and rear (DAMN! brakes that work! Endos are easy! woulda never thunk it), easy twist-grip shifters or paddle-style shifters, all quick-adjust seats and handlebars, Shimano components, and, of course, a 250W hub motor in the rear!

The bikes are super capable and great for an urban environment. A good workout, despite some folks' concerns that the electric motor does all the work. Not quite the case, given the variable motor assist control, and that you can still pedal your heart out. For me, the electric assist acts as a motivator.... for every pump of the crank, I get 3 in return! That motivates me to push it even harder than I would on a vintage steel frame, knowing I sort of need to conserve my energy as I go... on these e-bikes, I can go balls to the walls all day and vary the assist level to accommodate my stamina.

Now enough about me and a little more about the bikes and what I am looking to learn. I ran a bit of a search, but to be honest I dont know exactly what I'm looking for.

I think the pedal assist feels great and is generally well programmed. That said, I am hopeful that there is a method by which I can interface with the controller to, perhaps, reparameterize some of the control features. For example... after about a half a revolution of pedaling, the motor kicks on. I think that's reasonable. However, even after I stop pedaling, the motor stays on for a second or two or three. At speed, this isn't bad... but during low speed maneuvering and jockeying, the extra time the motor stays on is a bit clutzy. It'd be cool if I could decrease the "stay on" time.

Otherwise, and I think you knew this one is coming... the machine is classified as a "Class 1" electric bicycle, in that it ceases to provide assistance at 20mph. Hear me out - I'm generally ok with that, and I don't need assistance after 20mph. However, it does feel like the bike not only does not provide assistance after 20mph, but also actually speed-limits me. By that I mean, if I pedal all the way up to 20mph, and I'm in top gear, and still have some muster left in me and the gears... no matter what... I just can't get past 20. Similarly, it takes the joy out of bombing a hill. I will accelerate downhill until I reach this max speed... then thats it... I'd be going faster on my vintage Motobecane on the same hill, as it is not speed restricted.

The e-bike uses Bafang hub motors (spec sheet attached) and associated controller. I am looking, if such thing exists, for a hardware/software configuration that would allow me to interface with the controller via PC, and ideally adjust some of the parameters associated with the controllers operation. This may be an easy, obvious, or overasked question... but after a little research I am hoping you folks can help me get my bearings and point me in the right direction. Thanks!
-Steve
 

Attachments

  • 18 Bafang motor manual G020.250.DC 072617.pdf
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TMH

Well-Known Member
Welcome Steve,

I'm certain that there are significantly more knowledgeable folks who can probably answer your Bafang programming questions better. I do know that some Bafang systems actually allow a limiting (or perhaps an opening) of speed through the digital display in the settings menu.

One other thing to think about - The continuation of power after pedaling stops is pretty normal. I think that they are programmed that way so that the on-off is not so abrupt (plus cadence sensors only have a finite amount of resolution, depending on how many magnets they use). Perhaps a better 'fix' for the continuation 'issue' would be to touch the brake lever? I'm assuming that the Fuji bikes have motor inhibitors in the brakes? If they do, then just touching a brake lever will immediately cut off the motor's power.

Good luck in your new venture. I think that e-bikes in the U.S. are potentially at a point or just really starting to take off.
 

PortCityMopeds

New Member
Thanks for your response!

I am eager to hear from the more knowledgeable folks! I've seen some stuff here and there that looks like the right solution, but I'm looking to ensure compatibility with my system(s).

That's a good point, about the brakes, though it does not appear (I'll have to retest this) that the brakes are linked to the motor at all. I certainly don't recall seeing any sensors or electrical wires leaving the brake assemblies... so yes, stopping isn't usually an issue, but I am technically braking and applying motor power at the same time for brief periods of time. Cutting the "stay on" time by 20-30% might be nice, and I'd test it before recomending it to customers. Any adjustments or mods, of course, would "void the warranty" so to speak. And admittedly this question is in the interest of developing a programming profile that suits my riding style... and maybe something I can offer to customers.

I agree that the cadence sensor would be a limiting factor here as well.

I'm eager to put them on my floor, but need to weigh my involvement in sales this year carefully. We're a small shop, and adding another branch to our retail line takes a lot of resources... showroom square footage, a whole other line of parts and accessories, tools, mental capacity, etc. Plus, with all this pandemic crisis, a lot has changed... I expect sales to slow to some extent :(. But, in the meantime, I am looking to develop my capacity to sell and service these products so until further notice... excelsior!
 

monroe350

New Member
Welcome Steve,
I have an ebike with a 350W bafang(8fun) hub drive motor on a schwinn monroe. I doubt your bike is limited to 20 mph when going down hill or pedaling super fast. The motor will cut out at 20mph but unless you have regenerative braking. It is probably that your display will not show over 20mph? Many hub drive bikes have motor cut off sensors on the brakes. You will see an extra wire on the brake cables if you bike has it. Strange choice for a manufacturer to put more expensive hydraulic brakes and cheap out on a $20 brake cut off sensor. The hub motor part for bafang systems is actually pretty standard but the controller varies for different manufacturers. I have never heard of a way to change the firmware for a hub motor controller. There are some mid drive bike that support this. If you can find the controller there may be some unused wires for the brake inhibitor but this can be very tricky to find with out good documentation for the controller.

I would check out http://www.ebikeschool.com and https://endless-sphere.com/forums/ for more technical info about ebikes. I also recommend some of the Bolton bikes videos on you tube for technical details.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
You are a dealer and you are asking us? Wouldn't Bafang and Fuji be the first places to contact? I doubt if Bafang would baulk on telling you the programming used in that model. The motor isn't the issue, it's the "associated controller" that we need information about. Do you know the model of the display?
 
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TomD

Well-Known Member
Not looking to flame you but quite a few red flags here. If you are a dealer shouldn't you be working with fuji? If you hack the programming wouldn't you technically be voiding warranty for your customers? "250W hub motor in the rear! " Seriously? Who wants a 250W rear hub?!?!? You sell these bikes why? Because brand name gives you an opportunity to sell to customers who don't know better? I would say stop while you're ahead before you damage yourself financially. You seems to know your stuff, just not ebikes.
 

PortCityMopeds

New Member
Thanks for your replies, all. I'll try to address them all to keep this conversation productive and flame-free!

@monroe350 thank you! I'll check out those websites. I've heard the same mention about speed limiting - it must have regen braking if its limiting my speed. I'm trying to explain the feeling I get, but it feels an awful lot like the bike just can't accelerate past a given speed (granted, I don't have a speedo installed on any of these things so I'm really going by feel here). It feels like the motor is sort of synched in and locked in at "20mph" (whatever actual top speed is), and I am unable to accelerate the motor beyond its top speed. There are hills I've bombed that I know I should be accelerating on, but I'm just hitting a wall. I know what I can do... I'll bomb a hill, then shut the controller right off when I reach top speed. If the motor is limiting, then when I shut it all down, I should be able to accelerate past whatever the "limited" speed is. Or who knows, maybe its just in my head!

@rich c , fair question, but not necessarily the case. Fuji's dealer support has been great, though admittedly their technical assistance has been relatively limited. I have contact only with my sales rep, who is an avid cyclist and e-cyclist, and knows the product, but doesn't necessarily have "the goods" for "hacking" or reprogramming these things. The dealer/manufacturer's job is really to make sure I know how to receive & assemble the products, test them, perform pre-delivery inspections and routine service, and that's about it. There really isn't much reason for them to know how, or tell me how, to reconfigure their machinery in a way that it would operate outside its intended use. It may not come as a surprise to you that, I frequently find the hobbyists, tweakers, tuners, and DIYers, can develop a knowledge base that is equal to or greater than that of the OEM. If I want to soup up my Triumph Bonneville, I assure you I am going to ask a customs shop or DIY builder - not the OEM or factory.

Good point on the controller. I'll take some photos of it and the manual that comes with it and post so I can get a better idea of what I am working with.

@tomdav - ok, a little unnecessarily suspicious of you but I am happy to explain and elaborate. My response to Rich ought to clear up why I am looking to "the forums" (the tweakers, tuners, hobbyists, enthusiasts, with DIY and experimental hands-on knowledge) rather than Fuji. They've been great, but don't necessarily have the answer i'm looking for here, nor would I expect them to ("hey, how do I derestrict all those bikes your selling me!?").

Yes, if I hacked the programming that would likely void the warranty. Not only am I not necessarily intending to "hack" or otherwise modify units I sell to customers, or offer it as a service, but if I did, then we treat it just like any other "soup it up" job in the industry; we offer 50cc to 70cc upgrades for a lot of mopeds, and we simply let customers know that while it will perform reliably and be more capable than before, it is operating outside of its intended operating range and therefore not covered under warranty. We get them to agree, done deal. Simple as that.

250W hub in the rear.. seems pretty good to me? I think I made it pretty clear I'm new to the industry so I'm not sure what the issue is here, I'm sure there's something I'm missing. It seems a bit like your scoffing at the setup. Are there more powerful hub motors out there? Yes. Are their higher caliber products available for purchase at a higher price point? Yes. Do I, a casual cyclist, enjoy the heck out of the riding experience, and feel that the 250W pedal assist is a valuable addition to an average commuter's back wheel? Absolutely. Do I think the wants/needs of my prospective customer base will be similar, based on our status as entry level, novice, or casual cyclists? Yep. For the price point, I think its a great fit for a lot of riders... which, to answer your question, is why I'm considering carrying these products. Your suggestion that I am "pulling a fast one" is sort of unfair. I wouldn't carry the product if I didn't think it was a legitimately great option. My mention of the Fuji name was only to suggest that it helps people relate to and understand what it is they are buying. You can have a great quality product on your floor, but if folks have never heard of it.. that's a sort of mental barrier there. I deal with it with the gas scooters I sell: really good products at good price points, but brands that aren't household names - I sell a lot, but folks can stumble over the fact that its not a Vespa (a brand they've heard of). The fact that these Fujis are really solid products all the way around, PLUS its a brand folks are familiar and comfortable with, just makes for a great combo.

Thanks all!
 

TomD

Well-Known Member
Good luck in your endeavors but I'm not sure how you can genuinely market ebikes with 250W rear hubs as a solid product all the way around. Maybe if you were in some country that had a 250W limit and minimal hills or these were lightweight folders with smaller wheels. I burned out my 250W hub on my first ride. At least I could take it back to Costco and it led me to make more informed decisions going forward.
 

PortCityMopeds

New Member
Ok, thank you.

I'm curious about you burning out a 250W motor... what type of bike was that on? What was the controller like (pedal assist, standalone throttle, etc)? Who was the manufacturer? It seems like there is more to a motor failure than a simple assessment of its power output.

Its a solid product, since the quality is good to very good (granted, I've only done several hundred miles of product testing across 2-3 bikes, more will be necessary), the price is good, and it does exactly what it is intended to do; provides a modest amount of electrical assistance to aid the primary power plant (human).
 

TomD

Well-Known Member
It was a Jetson adventure: https://www.costco.com/jetson-adventure-electric-bike-.product.100370011.html

Not sure what hub motor brand but the reality is a 250W rear hub motor is going to overheat on sustained hills, assuming the controller doesn't shut it down first. Go ahead and find a steep sustained hill and ride your Fuji with 250W Bafang rear hub up it for 10 minutes at full assist and see what happens. I can conquer any hill with my 250W mid drive, the only limitation is battery. Different story with 250W rear hub.

I'm guessing if you were a prospective customer posting in the "ask court" section and mentioned you saw a Fuji bike at a local moped shop and were told it was a solid ebike with a 250W rear hub motor you would be advised to consider alternatives. I guess it depends on how much you are selling the bikes for. I'll just take the lowest priced model and assume no markup at $1399:


Compare to this:


or this:

(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)

or this:


or a plethora of other direct to conumer bikes with 500W or 750W rear hub priced at $1500 or less. Nobody is really marketing 250W rear hub ebikes in the US:
 

LimboJim

Well-Known Member
I went to the PCM website and searched the inventory. I saw no listings for electric mopeds or scooters (not that the OP stated above that they offer them, I was just curious).

In fact, I saw no listings for any mopeds, only 49cc Bintelli scooters with no pedals.

Doesn't Bintelli offer a line of e-bikes too?


 

PortCityMopeds

New Member
@LimboJim - thank you for visiting my website! I do not sell electric mopeds or scooters. We repair, service, sell, and (sometiems) rent, gas mopeds and gas scooters.

Re: moped vs scooter. No doubt I am familiar with the MOtor and PEDal requirement that defines a moped. However, in NH, all 49cc gas powered mopeds AND scooters are registered as MOPEDS (this is much easier, clerically, to base designation based on displacement rather than the presence of pedals). Therefore, regionally, among my customers and affiliates, the word "moped" and "scooter" is generally used interchangeably, with clarification and explanation added only when the exact distinction is required. You see a lack of mopeds currently available for sale as we do not have any in stock. There are few to no brands currently manufacturing new mopeds (I carried Tomos until they stopped importing in 2013, have not resumed since PGI started to import in the past few years), so our retail inventory generally consists of 80% new or used scooters, with a refurbished moped (typically 70s vintage). I'm sure you noticed the banner on the landing page of my website consists of a Puch, Cimatti, and Garelli. These classic mopeds are truly where we got our start, and still symbolic of the vehicles and riding style I and my business hold dear. Certainly what started my affinity for kind of obscure hybrid bicycles.

You won't see any Fuji products listed yet, as I've been pretty clear that I am actively considering if and how I will integrate them into my retail line. Amidst the many other variables that go into this decision making process, the current economic climate is sort of telling me that this year may not be the best to roll out a new product line. Who knows, though, still trying to be prepared.

Bintelli offers e-bikes, and they sort of encouraged me to get into them. I did some product testing and examined some "in the wild" and the product just isnt there. Quality is poor to ok, fit and finish sloppy, styling wise the bikes look goofy as hell, and the price point isn't any better than Fuji. I passed and kept doing research.

Aside, I've product tested some full electric scooters, too, including the Vespa Eletrica, some no-name products, and even some prototypes right off the boat from China. I'm convinced the performance just isnt there, comparable to a gas scooter. The range and top speed is so poor (relatively), yet the price point typically much higher... it just doesn't meet the standards my customers will expect, so I've passed on e-scooters. My assessment now is that they may be suitable for very dense urban environments where stop and go is frequent but longer bouts (even more than a handful of miles) are limited.

@tomdav I think that is a reasonable explanation. So long as the controller is programmed well and has appropriate sensing to determine "when" it should shut down - I think the bikes will be just fine. More product testing! I think it will work swell.

Your market assessment is ok, as well, but I won't go too far into that. Comparing a direct-to-consumer product to one that is purchased at a dealership is a bit apples and oranges. The same parallel exists with gas scooters. You can buy a cheap Tao Tao all day long on Amazon, shipped to your door, for far less than I sell my scooters. Some people do this - in my region, mostly college kids. They are left to uncrate and assemble their scooter with few to no tools or know-how, perform pre-run inspection, and end up with a poor quality product with little to no warranty support. They end up in my shop requiring significant repairs, and being in a bit of a bad mood :(. There are people who will do well with this arrangement, for sure! Some tools, a modest amount of technical aptitude, the patience to deal with some warranty support (or not) here and there. But, largely, these are not my customers - these are people who want a turnkey solution with confidence in the business they buy from, a real warranty, free tune-up at 30 days/150 miles, etc. Though it may be hard to relate, yes, folks are ready to pay "more" for that product and service.


I hope this has all helped you folks learn more about me and my business! I'm ready to learn more, if there is more, about interfacing with the controller. Is there a specific forum on this site that would be better for technical pursuits such as that?
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
@tomdav I think that is a reasonable explanation. So long as the controller is programmed well and has appropriate sensing to determine "when" it should shut down - I think the bikes will be just fine. More product testing! I think it will work swell.

Very optimistic statement based on your limit of experience of all things eBike, including no knowledge of how to or if programming can be modified on the brand you are looking at. But goes right along with working on expanding your product line in the middle of an expanding world pandemic and what could easily be the start of the greatest recession the United States has ever seen. Optimism is good, best of luck to you.
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
There is no such thing as a 250w motor, it is just a nominal number that is used to satisfy EU regulations. Some of the so called 250w mid drives can have a peak of up to 800w and most are at least 500w, it just depends on the battery voltage x the amps the controller allows. A 36v motor @ 10A has a 360w peak. Most manufactures, Bafang especially, use a 15A controller which would be 540w @ 36v.

It is my experience being able to set my wattage at exactly what I want is that the 350w range for urban/commuter riding on average terrain @ Fed Reg 20mph top speed, but mostly used at far less than that with stops and starts which is where an eBike shines.

OP, regarding this:

"I hope this has all helped you folks learn more about me and my business! I'm ready to learn more, if there is more, about interfacing with the controller. Is there a specific forum on this site that would be better for technical pursuits such as that?"

Go here but do a search or two there before you ask questions because more than likely they have already been answered multiple times as that site has been about the best source of hub eBike info online for years. https://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewforum.php?f=21&sid=b12218bd2e02b8e6417c0433194721f0
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Good morning all,
Steve here with Port City Mopeds in Portsmouth, NH. You can check us out at www.portsmouthmopeds.com. As the name suggests, we're typically focused on (gas) moped and scooter repair and sales. We've been in the business for 10+ years, and are just now (considering) adding electric bicycles to our product line.

Me and my staff are pretty darn good as far as wrench-turning goes, and we're acquainted with a variety of motorbikes - moped, scooter, motorcycle, European & Asian, vintage and contemporary. We've got hobby-level experience only when it comes to bicycle (and ebike) repair and services, but we're pretty technically capable and I'm confident in our ability to learn these new machines and provide excellent quality service.

I ordered a handful of Fuji e-bikes at the end of last season. https://www.fujibikes.com/usa/bikes/electric/. I got a bit of a sample pack of the more affordable units - E-Crosstown in men's and women's, E-Traverse M&W, and an E-Nevada.

I have to say I am quite happy with the products. While they may not be perfect, or the top of the line product, I think their price points are great, customers will be attracted to them, and frankly I think the build quality, fit and finish is all at least "good" if not better. Importantly, Fuji is a name folks recognize, which gives some confidence and brand recognition which helps with sales.

Personally, I've been in love with the products after some "rigorous product testing" :). I'm 31 and in decent shape... not particularly active but I've always loved bicycling, and everything on two wheels. I've only ever bicycled recreationally and casually, usually owning older Motobecane road bikes as I have an affinity for the brand, like vintage styling, and the old road bikes just work for me. More avid and current bicycle enthusiasts may be used to the luxuries and amenities of a more modern bike, but form my perspective, I went from vintage tech to high tech overnight! These things have hydraulic disc brake front and rear (DAMN! brakes that work! Endos are easy! woulda never thunk it), easy twist-grip shifters or paddle-style shifters, all quick-adjust seats and handlebars, Shimano components, and, of course, a 250W hub motor in the rear!

The bikes are super capable and great for an urban environment. A good workout, despite some folks' concerns that the electric motor does all the work. Not quite the case, given the variable motor assist control, and that you can still pedal your heart out. For me, the electric assist acts as a motivator.... for every pump of the crank, I get 3 in return! That motivates me to push it even harder than I would on a vintage steel frame, knowing I sort of need to conserve my energy as I go... on these e-bikes, I can go balls to the walls all day and vary the assist level to accommodate my stamina.

Now enough about me and a little more about the bikes and what I am looking to learn. I ran a bit of a search, but to be honest I don't know exactly what I'm looking for.

I think the pedal-assist feels great and is generally well programmed. That said, I am hopeful that there is a method by which I can interface with the controller to, perhaps, reparameterize some of the control features. For example... after about half a revolution of pedaling, the motor kicks on. I think that's reasonable. However, even after I stop pedaling, the motor stays on for a second or two or three. At speed, this isn't bad... but during low-speed maneuvering and jockeying, the extra time the motor stays on is a bit clutzy. It'd be cool if I could decrease the "stay on" time.

Otherwise, and I think you knew this one is coming... the machine is classified as a "Class 1" electric bicycle, in that it ceases to provide assistance at 20mph. Hear me out - I'm generally ok with that, and I don't need assistance after 20mph. However, it does feel like the bike not only does not provide assistance after 20mph but also actually speed-limits me. By that I mean, if I pedal all the way up to 20mph, and I'm in top gear, and still have some muster left in me and the gears... no matter what... I just can't get past 20. Similarly, it takes the joy out of bombing a hill. I will accelerate downhill until I reach this max speed... then that's it... I'd be going faster on my vintage Motobecane on the same hill, as it is not speed restricted.

The e-bike uses Bafang hub motors (spec sheet attached) and associated controller. I am looking, if such thing exists, for a hardware/software configuration that would allow me to interface with the controller via PC, and ideally adjust some of the parameters associated with the controllers operation. This may be an easy, obvious, or over asked question... but after a little research I am hoping you folks can help me get my bearings and point me in the right direction. Thanks!
-Steve


Steve, welcome to the EBR forums! It's often a tough crowd here, but stick with it... there is a wealth of knowledge available. ;)
 

TomD

Well-Known Member
There is no such thing as a 250w motor, it is just a nominal number that is used to satisfy EU regulations. Some of the so called 250w mid drives can have a peak of up to 800w and most are at least 500w, it just depends on the battery voltage x the amps the controller allows. A 36v motor @ 10A has a 360w peak. Most manufactures, Bafang especially, use a 15A controller which would be 540w @ 36v.

It is my experience being able to set my wattage at exactly what I want is that the 350w range for urban/commuter riding on average terrain @ Fed Reg 20mph top speed, but mostly used at far less than that with stops and starts which is where an eBike shines.

OP, regarding this:

"I hope this has all helped you folks learn more about me and my business! I'm ready to learn more, if there is more, about interfacing with the controller. Is there a specific forum on this site that would be better for technical pursuits such as that?"

Go here but do a search or two there before you ask questions because more than likely they have already been answered multiple times as that site has been about the best source of hub eBike info online for years. https://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewforum.php?f=21&sid=b12218bd2e02b8e6417c0433194721f0

You can feed as many volts / amps you want and say it's volts x amps W but there is going to be a very real difference in what a higher rated hub can handle. Bafang is not stamping 250W on their 500W or 750W hubs. Their 250W rated hubs are physically smaller and unlikely built to handle much more than 500W continuous.

Doubt the OP will find much useful info on ES. Maybe 10 years ago when people were building ebikes with 250W rear hubs. I searched for the H400 motor on ES and got only a few hits, mostly folks looking for info. I did find the motor on the Bafang site. It's the lowest spec motor they sell. Maximum torque of 30 Nm. Does not inspire confidence given they also sell a 250W H400B version with a higher torque rating.





My suggestion would be to contact eggrider and give them specific info about the motor/controller. They will be able to confirm whether they have a compatible display to program the controller.


I still don't know why anyone would try to put much effort into selling these bikes in the US. Maybe if you wanted to have an offering that nobody else sells, and there is probably a good reason for that.
 

Browneye

Well-Known Member
Ya, Fuji makes nice bikes, nearly bought a crossbike/hybrid from them last go-round in 2016, but got a Spec CrossRoads instead. The Fuji was a very nice bike at a very good price - 700 wheels, great ergos and brakes, nice shifter, very nice bike.

From what I understand certain controllers have a way to 'hack' them, but the ones I've seen are expensive. I think they are more common for the bafang mid-drives. I put a Bafang 500w hub on the wife's bike and learned a lot about the whole process - they're rather simple and complex all at the same time. If I put a 36v pack on it then it would be a 350. I've ridden a Pace 350 and it's plenty adequate for power, a very nice bike at a really good price point. The Pace500 does have a little more power and some nicer components. I'm sure a 250w would be a 36v and probly not very fast accelerating, but would surely move you along.

I would love to demo a Fuji ebike. Another fairly mainstream brand that's jumped into the fray is Raleigh. I eyeballed a couple of eMTB's that looked pretty good, but did not try them.

The first thing I would program is a lower starting speed for PAS1, adjust the other levels from there. Our 5 levels don't adjust accordingly when you limit speed from 45kmh to 30, pas1 is still about 15kmh and the bigger the hub drive the faster it wants to get to that speed. Frankly I think 45km is way too fast for that kind of bike. Surely a 250w bike isn't going to be for hotdog roadies.

Anyway, my guess is if you could figure out an interface to connect to the controller and then have some kind of interface to change parameters, you could reprogram it. If you figure it out I'm all in. 👍
 
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TomD

Well-Known Member
Court did some reviews on their mid drive bikes a few years ago. I'd think those would be way more interesting than rear hubs. Here's one with a Bosch mid drive and 500wh battery. Not bad if anyone is looking for a mid drive with plus sized tires:


Suspect it would blow away any Fuji with a POS 250W Bafang rear hub drive for the same money.

Seriously, OP should order one and compare. Will probably be able to sell it for what they paid. ;)
 
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sc00ter

Active Member
Ah, Port City. Seen you on Moped Army. I've owned a few mopeds. Have a 98 Zuma now but lost interest in it. 250 watt? Performance Bike Shop was blowing those out when they went under. I forgot the price, but my boss went and test rode it after borrowing my Pedego and left empty handed. And I consider my Pedego slow sometimes! And please note, anything over 20mph is like riding a bucking bronco on most sidewalks or bumpy/pot holed streets. Nicer, full suspension fat tires do good, not entry level Fuji ebikes. Not trashing your business plans, but if these were the same Fuji's still in the closed Performance shops, there is a reason. If you really want to experiment with ebikes, Bintelli has/had some. Or try to partner with Rad Power or other up and coming price based brands. The reason I lost interest in the Zuma? I like my ebike much more! Quiet, clean and easy to care for.