Full suspension with Belt drive - why ?

pushkar

Well-Known Member
I love belt drives and low maintenance angle. The amount of engineering involved to make this happen is crazy (I mean in a good way, but still crazy).

I would be curious to see if people have used a belt long term with an FS bike, and what their experience has been? Does it ever come off ? What limitations have you noticed?

Hypothetically if there was a mainstream provider of such a bike(edit: beyond R&M).. what would be attractive about it?
 
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pushkar

Well-Known Member
You are right. I just assumed RM as a given so the question was more beyond RM.

I edited my question.
 

pennybags

Member
I don’t know what the limitations are. It does look frigging awesome.

I’ll be watching this thread closely to hear opinions from those who own one.

I would say full suspension is already so comfortable. May be belt just gives it a more bulletproof feel?
 

onlineaddy

Well-Known Member
The main purpose of a belt to me is low maintenance. FS, on the other hand, is for both comfort and safety, as we keep the wheels on the ground as much as possible. This is all from the standpoint of a commuter bike.
 

AdilDesai

Active Member
I told @pushkar a few weeks ago that if he built a full suspension, mid-tail e-cargo bike they would come! I'll be the first buyer. Rohloff, Gates, Full Suspension, Carrying Capacity. Truly a Superbike!
 

AdilDesai

Active Member
I love belt drives and low maintenance angle. The amount of engineering involved to make this happen is crazy (I mean in a good way, but still crazy).

I would be curious to see if people have used a belt long term with an FS bike, and what their experience has been? Does it ever come off ? What limitations have you noticed?

Hypothetically if there was a mainstream provider of such a bike(edit: beyond R&M).. what would be attractive about it?
To answer your question: low maintenance and comfort on the road and/or trails. Not sure what else, but these two are huge.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
The main purpose of a belt to me is low maintenance. FS, on the other hand, is for both comfort and safety, as we keep the wheels on the ground as much as possible. This is all from the standpoint of a commuter bike.
Isn't belt more durable?
I hear people snapping chain on mid drive all the time.

Belt drive on the other hand, is less likely to snap. Which is better for long touring and commuting.

I was checking out Bridgestone mamachari ebikes on their Japanese website and I would say most of them were belt drive.
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Today was one of the few days when I'd really want an FS bike (1500+ foot descent down eroded and decommissioned logging roads). In general I'm not super-happy with an FS bike because of the added weight, complexity, and loss of road feel.

My observation is that the technical challenge in putting a belt drive on an FS bike is maintaining belt tension, and you'll need some kind of mechanism to make that happen.
 

smorgasbord

Well-Known Member
FS is overkill for a commuter bike that will be mostly on paved roads. Suspension seatpost should more than meet this need.
Maybe the roads where you are are smooth, not so much in NorCal.

I rode a hardtail with Kinekt and a full suspension (Rockshox) bike back to back once. Instantly could tell the difference in that the FS hugged the ground better. Yeah, the seatpost cushions the potholes and bumps, but it doesn't keep the rear wheel firmly planted on the ground like FS does.

And as soon as you leave pavement it's night and day.

I got over 8000 miles on my analog bike with Campy 10-speed Chorus chain.

Now that I've discovered White Lightning's "Clean Streak" cleaning the chain isn't such a chore anymore. And the reported longetivity of SRAM's X01 and XX1 Eagle chains (which work well on lower-end GX Eagle drivetrains) should make chain replacement less frequent. We'll see.
 

vincent

Well-Known Member
I also wonder where all these people live that say their roads are smooth! Not here in AZ

want a belt because i do not ever want to clean the chain, basically want to ride and never do anything to the bike

All my work/maintenance is done at the bike shop, the less i need to be there the better

will have to check out white lightenings clean streak cleaner
but I would be happy never cleaning a chain or the little wheels and teeth again

a quick question, if the belt breaks or comes off why is it hard to get back on? seems like it would be no worse than a chain..???
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Additional mechanism means more parts to maintain and replace. FS is overkill for a commuter bike that will be mostly on paved roads. Suspension seatpost should more than meet this need.
I don't know about that.. I have a Juiced CrossCurrent Air, and initially I didn't think it was a big deal not to have suspension because Stromer didn't have it.

I was wrong, so I got the front suspension fork, which made the ride better but I still wish I had a rear suspension too.
 

byunbee

Well-Known Member
I guess I can't speak for everyone. I live in so cal and most road are pretty smooth and bike path is smooth as well.
 

vincent

Well-Known Member
Will keep this up to date on whether i have more things break on this fs than my other hardtails

but as far as cost of maintenance etc i am totally fine paying extra money to have the smoother ride , for me it is worth it
 

vincent

Well-Known Member
I think it is way more comfortable and do think it rides/handles better for the dirt roads etc I ride on

For me a rack is definitely needed, fenders I can live without but only because I don’t ride in the rain and it is really dry here most of the time

Meant to add this to my thread about my bike but the sks fenders fit too tight to the tires for the off road stuff I do
Rocks get stuck in the tires and roll into the fender quite a bit and make a lot of noise, they fall out quickly but at some point I might put more of a simple, shorter mtn bike fender on mine