Gen2 Bosch tools for dongle

kennyzzz

New Member
hi new member here, thinking of getting a haibike, so wondering about how many miles people have on their bikes, also i'm a heavy person at 240 pounds and if anyone is in my weight , how does bike work for them...
 

William Stoltz

New Member
hi new member here, thinking of getting a haibike, so wondering about how many miles people have on their bikes, also i'm a heavy person at 240 pounds and if anyone is in my weight , how does bike work for them...
I weigh over 200, and have a Haibike trekking to commute to work, about 18 miles round trip. I am very pleased with it. I can get about 40 miles on a charge, and the bike is quite comfortable. The power is more than enough to get me to the office, over some serious hills, and not sweat so much that I need to change clothes once I arrive. I now ride almost every day. My old bike was ridden on rare occasions, while my Haibike is ridden on every occasion.
 

Christopher85083

Active Member
Sprocket change would affect your cadence (pedaling speed), but it won't make you go faster. It's just a heavy, inefficient bike is all. It's designed to run with a motor, not without it, after all.

Chip it.
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
Sprocket change would affect your cadence (pedaling speed), but it won't make you go faster. It's just a heavy, inefficient bike is all. It's designed to run with a motor, not without it, after all.

Chip it.

I dont' think you understand what a sprocket does. If I go to a larger front sprocket, a given (same) cadence will result in HIGHER SPEED.
Unrelated to the mph speed cutoff.
Bike is not that heavy or inefficient, I ride 1/2 of eash ride unboosted.
Those of you who say Ebikes are too heavy or "have too much drag" are simply weak and not trying very hard. ;)
Not interested in chipping it. I like my warranty and I'd like for Ebikes to STAY LEGAL in my area.
Others can go on ahead and destroy the Ebike evironment where you live. ;)
 

Christopher85083

Active Member
Like I said, a sprocket change will affect your cadence, but lower your output power. If you can pedal just as fast or faster with a larger sprocket, then yes, you will go faster. But you will be beyond the motor's ability to assist, and it is unlikely you will be able to maintain any increase in speed without the motor assist. It's just not that kind of bike.

Your call on the chip.
 

NoDTMF

Active Member
> Others can go on ahead and destroy the Ebike evironment where you live.

What does that statement mean?
 

kennyzzz

New Member
the reason i asked about weight, in the reviews i see,, court's and others is the the people are skinny, me I'm 240 pounds and worried if it would work good with someone of my heavy size,, I did not want to start a separate thread on it... also wondering about how many miles people have on their bike,, ie 2000 miles and no motor troubles... I understand that at my weight i would get less miles on battery charge then others,,, but I'm wondering how many miles people have on the motors... i understand chains and such are wear items..
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
> Others can go on ahead and destroy the Ebike evironment where you live.

What does that statement mean?


Ebikes are being banned right and left from most all off road riding areas and many mixed use trail systems.

Most of the bad press is about high speeds and too much power.

People that DON"T ride Ebikes WILL make the decisions on where and IF we can ride our Ebikes "there". (specific sites)

SO far, it's NOT going well for us.

We are ALL ambassaders for our sport. Some in a negative way by going faster than is safe and or reasonable. That makes us ALL look bad.
(not talking about road use commuters)

Nuff said?
 

Paladin

New Member
I bought my electric mountain bike because I wanted to go faster than my standard mountain bike. 20 miles per hour just doesn't get it. I too will be buying a dongle very soon.
 

NoDTMF

Active Member
Hmmm seems like a number of issues are getting mixed in. Firstly, I get passed on bike trails that have 15 mph speed limits (Los Gatos, CA) by normal bikes. So, that is a bike problem, not an e-bike problem. As for top speed, say 28 mph, I don't understand the issue...I see normal peddle bikes exceed that speed. So why can't an e-bike go that speed? And how is it bad if someone adds a dongle vs buying a bike that allows that speed?

I started mountain biking in the 80's in Canada. Banff basically banned mountain bikes...said we ruined the trails, but horses were okay. Well horses ruined the tails as well ( I rode horses too). In the United States with the growing baby boomer population, I tend to agree that e-bikes will get acceptance, just take a little time. I have only ridden my ebike in CA, northern and southern, and I haven't had any negative issues. For the record my bike is governed at 16 mph (2014 Bosch Active line) and I would like to dongle it, but probably won't. My riding consists of:
-commuting with 15 mph speed limits
-pretty hardcore offroad where just getting up the hill is of concern, and keeping the speed below 30 going down is a challenge.

Anyway, I am enjoying my bike, there are times I would like it to assist me at higher speeds, but what the hell...I'm happy.
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
I bought my electric mountain bike because I wanted to go faster than my standard mountain bike. 20 miles per hour just doesn't get it. I too will be buying a dongle very soon.

Bet you $1000 you are already faster than on your standard mtb.
Enjoy your dongle!
 

Christopher85083

Active Member
For those slow to grasp the obvious.

http://reviews.mtbr.com/moab-blm-bans-electric-bikes-on-non-motorized-trails

Decisions are being made NOW on whether they will be allowed going forward. Most here (all in this thread?) haven't a CLUE that there is even a discussion, much less LAWS being crafted.
The debate will be over before most of you ever open your mouth. (except here)

DUH

We all get it. You aren't a dongle fan. Enough already.

Would you be comfortable with your car being physically limited to the speed limit? Or would you start thread after thread on some car forum somewhere asking about your missing mph?

Let it go, man. Embrace the dongle, find your missing mph, and just ride responsibly. You can already buy lots of bikes here that have a 28 mph limit.
 

opimax

Well-Known Member
And lots of people can 28 or more on a regular bike (not me). when I ride the trail to York i do not see what difference the trail see if i limit myself to 20??? maybe take longer???? spray the gravel further?hit more hikers? (just tempted, not really)
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
And lots of people can 28 or more on a regular bike (not me). when I ride the trail to York i do not see what difference the trail see if i limit myself to 20??? maybe take longer???? spray the gravel further?hit more hikers? (just tempted, not really)
I don't know when the last time you rode the trail to York was? Maryland's section is in many places 4 feet wide and is mostly all on a curve, with dense vegetation allowing for ~50-100 yards of distance visibility. There are sections of only a single track in each direction. Pennsylvania's 25 miles has maybe ~16 or so right angle rail crossings you have make with the trail maybe 20 feet wide at the crossings (that includes the rail). The entire 45 miles of trail crosses many country roads. York is a small city. Throw in pedestrians, some small children and other bikes, I don't know where you can go 20 mph, much less 28? I know of 2 short sections you could top 20 for a minute or so, a mile or so each; one just north of Glen Rock and the other just south of York. Wintertime, if there isn't any snow or ice-pack you'd have a better shot at it, a lot less people and the lack of vegetation increases distance visibility and reaction time.

I'd bet rural riding in the eastern woods of the US, the above describes it for most unpaved rail-trails, canal towpaths and MUP's. There's very few opportunities to ride a bicycle 28 mph in the dirt here and I know it isn't safe.
 
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opimax

Well-Known Member
I don't think that I can really do 28 on the trail, usual do the MD 1/2. I just opposed to arbitrary numbers being the guidance to what is acceptable and i believe it is up to the individual to be responsible for their actions, wrong or right. My Subaru can probably still do 90, I will never know , especially on a street w/25 mph limit and a 60lb bike on the back. We don't need legislation we need responsibility IMHO. If it's a bike trail let me ride my bike on it. I have extra insurance for the bike, i have a driver's license and i don't like getting hurt(I will use good judgement). I should be allowed to ride a type 3 bike on it.